• Chirality in condensed matter is now a topic of the utmost importance because of its significant role in the understanding and mastering of a large variety of new fundamental physicals mechanisms. Versatile experimental approaches, capable to reveal easily the exact winding of order parameters are therefore essential. Here we report X-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) as a straightforward tool to identify directly the properties of chiral magnetic systems. We show that it can straight-forwardly and unambiguously determine the main characteristics of chiral magnetic distributions: i.e. its chiral nature, the quantitative winding sense (clockwise or counter-clockwise) and its type (N\'eel/cycloidal or Bloch/helical). This method is model-independent, does not require a-priori knowledge of magnetic parameters and can be applied to any system with magnetic domains ranging from few nanometers (wavelength limited) to several microns. By using prototypical multilayers with tailored magnetic chiralities based on the Co|Pt interface we illustrate the strength of this method.
  • We present measurements of the Spin Hall Effect (SHE) in AuW and AuTa alloys for a large range of W or Ta concentrations by combining experiments on lateral spin valves and Ferromagnetic-Resonance/spin pumping technique. The main result is the identification of a large enhancement of the Spin Hall Angle (SHA) by the side-jump mechanism on Ta impurities, with a SHA as high as + 0.5 (i.e $50\%$) for about 10\% of Ta. In contrast the SHA in AuW does not exceed + 0.15 and can be explained by intrinsic SHE of the alloy without significant extrinsic contribution from skew or side-jump scattering by W impurities. The AuTa alloys, as they combine a very large SHA with a moderate resistivity (smaller than $85\,\mu\Omega.cm$), are promising for spintronic devices exploiting the SHE.
  • We experimentally investigate the current-induced magnetization reversal in Pt/[Co/Ni]$_3$/Al multilayers combining the anomalous Hall effect and magneto-optical Kerr effect techniques in crossbar geometry. The magnetization reversal occurs through nucleation and propagation of a domain of opposite polarity for a current density of the order of 0.3 TA/m$^2$. In these experiments we demonstrate a full control of each stage: i)the {\O}rsted field controls the domain nucleation and ii) domain-wall propagation occurs by spin torque from the Pt spin Hall effect. This scenario requires an in-plane magnetic field to tune the domain wall center orientation along the current for efficient domain wall propagation. Indeed, as nucleated, domain walls are chiral and N\'eel like due to the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction.
  • We present a novel method to extract the various contributions to the photonic local density of states from near-field fluorescence maps. The approach is based on the simultaneous mapping of the fluorescence intensity and decay rate, and on the rigorous application of the reciprocity theorem. It allows us to separate the contributions of the radiative and the apparent non-radiative local density of states to the change in the decay rate. The apparent non-radiative contribution accounts for losses due to radiation out of the detection solid angle and to absorption in the environment. Data analysis relies on a new analytical calculation, and does not require the use of numerical simulations. One of the most relevant applications of the method is the characterization of nanostructures aimed at maximizing the number of photons emitted in the detection solid angle, which is a crucial issue in modern nanophotonics.
  • Surface topography dictates the deterministic functionality of diffraction by a surface. In order to maximize the efficiency with which a diffractive optical component, such as a grating or a diffractive lens, directs light into a chosen order of diffraction, it is necessary that it be "blazed". The efficiency of most diffractive optical components reported so far varies with the wavelength, and blazing is achieved only at a specific nominal energy, the blaze wavelength. The existence of spurious light in undesirable orders represents a severe limitation that prevents using diffractive components in broadband systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate that broadband blazing over almost one octave can be achieved by combining advanced optical design strategies and artificial dielectric materials that offer dispersion chromatism much stronger than those of conventional bulk materials. The possibility of maintaining an efficient funneling of the energy into a specific order over a broad spectral range may empower advanced research to achieve greater control over the propagation of light, leading to more compact, efficient and versatile optical components.
  • a-Nb(x)Si(1-x) thin films with thicknesses down to 25 {\AA} have been structurally characterized by TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) measurements. As-deposited or annealed films are shown to be continuous and homogeneous in composition and thickness, up to an annealing temperature of 500{\deg}C. We have carried out low temperature transport measurements on these films close to the superconductor-to-insulator transition (SIT), and shown a qualitative difference between the effect of annealing or composition, and a reduction of the film thickness on the superconducting properties of a-NbSi. These results question the pertinence of the sheet resistance R_square as the relevant parameter to describe the SIT.
  • A dedicated analysis of the muon-induced background in the EDELWEISS dark matter search has been performed on a data set acquired in 2009 and 2010. The total muon flux underground in the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) was measured to be $\Phi_{\mu}=(5.4\pm 0.2 ^{+0.5}_{-0.9})$\,muons/m$^2$/d. The modular design of the muon-veto system allows the reconstruction of the muon trajectory and hence the determination of the angular dependent muon flux in LSM. The results are in good agreement with both MC simulations and earlier measurements. Synchronization of the muon-veto system with the phonon and ionization signals of the Ge detector array allowed identification of muon-induced events. Rates for all muon-induced events $\Gamma^{\mu}=(0.172 \pm 0.012)\, \rm{evts}/(\rm{kg \cdot d})$ and of WIMP-like events $\Gamma^{\mu-n} = 0.008^{+0.005}_{-0.004}\, \rm{evts}/(\rm{kg \cdot d})$ were extracted. After vetoing, the remaining rate of accepted muon-induced neutrons in the EDELWEISS-II dark matter search was determined to be $\Gamma^{\mu-n}_{\rm irred} < 6\cdot 10^{-4} \, \rm{evts}/(\rm{kg \cdot d})$ at 90%\,C.L. Based on these results, the muon-induced background expectation for an anticipated exposure of 3000\,\kgd\ for EDELWEISS-3 is $N^{\mu-n}_{3000 kg\cdot d} < 0.6$ events.
  • We report on the superconducting properties of amorphous NbxSi1-x thin films. The normal-state resistance and critical temperatures can be separately adjusted to suit the desired application. Notably, the relatively low electron-phonon coupling of these films makes them good candidates for an "all electron bolometer" for Cosmological Microwave Background radiation detection. Moreover, this device can be made to suit both high and low impedance readouts.
  • One of the major challenges of modern cosmology is the detection of B-mode polarization anisotropies in the CMB. These originate from tensor fluctuations of the metric produced during the inflationary phase. Their detection would therefore constitute a major step towards understanding the primordial Universe. The expected level of these anisotropies is however so small that it requires a new generation of instruments with high sensitivity and extremely good control of systematic effects. We propose the QUBIC instrument based on the novel concept of bolometric interferometry, bringing together the sensitivity advantages of bolometric detectors with the systematics effects advantages of interferometry. Methods: The instrument will directly observe the sky through an array of entry horns whose signals will be combined together using an optical combiner. The whole set-up is located inside a cryostat. Polarization modulation will be achieved using a rotating half-wave plate and interference fringes will be imaged on two focal planes (separated by a polarizing grid) tiled with bolometers. We show that QUBIC can be considered as a synthetic imager, exactly similar to a usual imager but with a synthesized beam formed by the array of entry horns. Scanning the sky provides an additional modulation of the signal and improve the sky coverage shape. The usual techniques of map-making and power spectrum estimation can then be applied. We show that the sensitivity of such an instrument is comparable with that of an imager with the same number of horns. We anticipate a low level of beam-related systematics thanks to the fact that the synthesized beam is determined by the location of the primary horns. Other systematics should be under good control thanks to an autocalibration technique, specific to our concept, that will permit the accurate determination of most of the systematics parameters.
  • Muon-induced neutrons constitute a prominent background component in a number of low count rate experiments, namely direct searches for Dark Matter. In this work we describe a neutron detector to measure this background in an underground laboratory, the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane. The system is based on 1 m3 of Gd-loaded scintillator and it is linked with the muon veto of the EDELWEISS-II experiment for coincident muon detection. The system was installed in autumn 2008 and passed since then a number of commissioning tests proving its full functionality. The data-taking is continuously ongoing and a count rate of the order of 1 muon-induced neutron per day has been achieved.
  • This paper describes precise measurements of the thermal neutron flux in the LSM underground laboratory in proximity of the EDELWEISS-II dark matter search experiment together with short measurements at various other locations. Monitoring of the flux of thermal neutrons is accomplished using a mobile detection system with low background proportional counter filled with $^3$He. On average 75 neutrons per day are detected with a background level below 1 count per day (cpd). This provides a unique possibility of a day by day study of variations of the neutron field in a deep underground site. The measured average 4$\pi$ neutron flux per cm$^{2}$ in the proximity of EDELWEISS-II is $\Phi_{MB}=3.57\pm0.05^{stat}\pm0.27^{syst}\times 10^{-6}$ neutrons/sec. We report the first experimental observation that the point-to-point thermal neutron flux at LSM varies by more than a factor two.
  • The EDELWEISS-II collaboration has performed a direct search for WIMP dark matter with an array of ten 400 g heat-and-ionization cryogenic detectors equipped with interleaved electrodes for the rejection of near-surface events. Six months of continuous operation at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane have been achieved. The observation of one nuclear recoil candidate above 20 keV in an effective exposure of 144 kgd is interpreted in terms of limits on the cross-section of spin-independent interactions of WIMPs and nucleons. A cross-section of 1.0x10^-7 pb is excluded at 90%CL for a WIMP mass of 80 GeV/c2. This result demonstrates for the first time the very high background rejection capabilities of these simple and robust detectors in an actual WIMP search experiment.
  • Results of a long-term monitoring ($\gtrsim 10$ years) of the broad line and continuum fluxes of three Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), 3C 390.3, NGC 4151, and NGC 5548, are presented. We analyze the H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ profile variations during the monitoring period and study different details (as bumps, absorption bands) which can indicate structural changes in the Broad Line Region (BLR). The BLR dimensions are estimated using the time lags between the continuum and the broad lines flux variations. We find that in the case of 3C 390.3 and NGC 5548 a disk geometry can explain both the broad line profiles and their flux variations, while the BLR of NGC 4151 seems more complex and is probably composed of two or three kinematically different regions.
  • A new design of a cryogenic germanium detector for dark matter search is presented, taking advantage of the coplanar grid technique of event localisation for improved background discrimination. Experiments performed with prototype devices in the EDELWEISS II setup at the Modane underground facility demonstrate the remarkably high efficiency of these devices for the rejection of low-energy $\beta$, approaching 10$^5$ . This opens the road to investigate the range beyond 10$^{-8}$ pb in the WIMP-nucleon collision cross-sections, as proposed in the EURECA project of a one-ton cryogenic detector mass.
  • Results of a long-term spectral monitoring of the active galactic nucleus of NGC 4151 are presented (11 years, from 1996 to 2006). High quality spectra (S/N>50 in the continuum near Halpha and Hbeta) were obtained in the spectral range ~4000 to 7500 \AA, with a resolution between 5 and 15 A, using the 6-m and the 1-m SAO's telescopes (Russia), the GHAO's 2.1-m telescope (Cananea, Mexico), and the OAN-SPM's 2.1-m telescope (San-Pedro, Mexico). The observed fluxes of the Halpha, Hbeta, Hgamma and HeII emission lines and of the continuum at the observed wavelength 5117 A, were corrected for the position angle, the seeing and the aperture effects. We found that the continuum and line fluxes varied strongly (up to a factor 6) during the monitoring period. The emission was maximum in 1996-1998, and there were two minima, in 2001 and in 2005. The Halpha, Hgamma and He II fluxes were well correlated with the Hbeta flux. We considered three characteristic periods during which the Hbeta and Halpha profiles were similar: 1996-1999, 2000-2001 and 2002-2006. The line to continuum flux ratios were different; in particular during the first period, the lines were not correlated with the continuum and saturated at high fluxes. In the second and third period, where the continuum flux was small, the Halpha and Hbeta fluxes were well correlated to the continuum flux, meaning that the ionizing continuum was a good extrapolation of the optical continuum. The CCFs are often asymmetrical and the time lags between the lines and the continuum are badly defined indicating the presence of a complex BLR, with dimensions from 1 to 50 light-days.
  • Light localization on commensurate arrangements of metallic sub-wavelength grooves is studied. We theoretically show that as the degree of commensuration tends to an irrational number new light localization states are produced. These have properties close to that reported for hot spots on disordered surfaces and are not permitted for simple period gratings. Some theoretical predictions are experimentally provided in the infra-red region by reflectivity measurements performed on two commensurate samples with respectively two and three slits per period.
  • The heat quenching factor Q' (the ratio of the heat signals produced by nuclear and electron recoils of equal energy) of the heat-and-ionization germanium bolometers used by the EDELWEISS collaboration has been measured. It is explained how this factor affects the energy scale and the effective quenching factor observed in calibrations with neutron sources. This effective quenching effect is found to be equal to Q/Q', where Q is the quenching factor of the ionization yield. To measure Q', a precise EDELWEISS measurement of Q/Q' is combined with values of Q obtained from a review of all available measurements of this quantity in tagged neutron beam experiments. The systematic uncertainties associated with this method to evaluate Q' are discussed in detail. For recoil energies between 20 and 100 keV, the resulting heat quenching factor is Q' = 0.91+-0.03+-0.04, where the two errors are the contributions from the Q and Q/Q' measurements, respectively. The present compilation of Q values and evaluation of Q' represent one of the most precise determinations of the absolute energy scale for any detector used in direct searches for dark matter.
  • The 2-10 keV continuum of AGN is generally well represented by a single power law. However, at smaller energies the continuum displays an excess with respect to the extrapolation of this power law, called the ''soft X-ray excess''. Until now this soft X-ray excess was attributed, either to reflection of the hard X-ray source by the accretion disk, or to the presence of an additional comptonizing medium, giving a steep spectrum. An alternative solution proposed by Gierlinski and Done (2004) is that a single power law well represents both the soft and the hard X-ray emission and the impression of the soft X-ray excess is due to absorption of a primary power law by a relativistic wind. We examine the advantages and drawbacks of reflection versus absorption models, and we conclude that the observed spectra can be well modeled, either by absorption (for a strong excess), or by reflection (for a weak excess). However the physical conditions required by the absorption models do not seem very realistic: we would prefer an ''hybrid model''.
  • The final results of the EDELWEISS-I dark matter search using cryogenic heat-and-ionization Ge detectors are presented. The final data sample corresponds to an increase by a factor five in exposure relative to the previously published results. A recoil energy threshold of 13 keV or better was achieved with three 320g detectors working simultaneously over four months of stable operation. Limits on the spin-independent cross-section for the scattering of a WIMP on a nucleon are derived from an accumulated fiducial exposure of 62 kg.d.
  • The EDELWEISS collaboration is searching for WIMP dark matter using natural Ge cryogenic detectors. The whole data set of the first phase of the experiment contains a fiducial exposure of 4.8 kg.day on Ge-73, the naturally present (7.8%), high-spin Ge isotope. The sensitivity of the experiment to the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interactions is evaluated using the model-independent framework proposed by Tovey et al.
  • Using the BH masses deduced from the empirical relation of Kaspi et al. (2000) and assuming that the optical luminosity is provided by the accretion disc, we show that Narrow Line Seyfert Galaxies 1 (NLS1s) accrete at super-Eddington rates, while their luminosity stays of the order of the Eddington limit. We take into account the possibility of a non-viscous energy release in the gravitationally unstable region of the disc. It leads to a smaller accretion rate and to a redder continuum than a standard disc, which agrees better with the observations. The observed bolometric luminosities appear to saturate at a few times the Eddington luminosity for super-Eddington accretion rates, as predicted by slim disc models. The accretion rate stays always of the order of a few M$_{\odot}$/yr, indicating that the growing of the BH is mass supply limited . Since the masses of the BH increases by one order of magnitude in a few 10$^7$ years, it could explain why NLS1s appear to not follow the same BH - bulge relation as other galaxies. NLS1s should thus play an important role in shaping the mass function of local BHs. We discuss the possibility that the masses could be systematically underestimated due to an inclination effect, and we conclude that the accretion rates could thus be strongly overestimated, but only in a small proportion of objects.
  • Between 1996 and 2002, we have carried out a spectral monitoring program for the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548. High quality spectra (S/N>50), covering the spectral range (4000-7500)AA were obtained with the 6 m and 1 m telescopes of SAO (Russia) and with the 2.1 m telescope GHO (Mexico). We found that both the flux in the lines and the continuum gradually decreased, reaching minimum values during May-June 2002. The mean, rms, and the averaged over years, observed and difference line profiles of H-alpha and H-beta reveal the double peaked structure at the radial velocity ~+-1000km/s. The relative intensity of these peaks changes with time. During 1996, the red peak was the brightest, while in 1998 - 2002, the blue peak became the brighter one. In 2000-2002 a distinct third peak appeared in the red wing of H-alpha and H-beta line profiles. The radial velocity of this feature decreased between 2000 and 2002 from ~+2500 km/s to ~+2000 km/s. The fluxes of the various parts of the line profiles are well correlated with each other and also with the continuum flux. Shape changes of the different parts of the broad line are not correlated with continuum variations and, apparently, are not related to reverberation effects. Changes of the integral Balmer decrement are, on average, anticorrelated with the continuum flux variations. This is probably due to an increasing role of collisional excitation as the ionizing flux decreases. Our results favor the formation of the broad Balmer lines in a turbulent accretion disc with large and moving "optically thick" inhomogeneities, capable of reprocessing the central source continuum.
  • In the era of XMM-Newton and Chandra missions, it is crucial to use codes able to compute correctly the line spectrum of X-ray irradiated thick media (Thomson thickness of the order of unity) to build models for the structure and the emission of the central regions of AGN or X-ray binaries. In all photoionized codes except in our code Titan, the line intensities are computed with the "escape probability approximation". In its last version, Titan solves the transfer of a thousand lines and of the continuum with the ``Accelerated Lambda Iteration" method, which is one of the most efficient and most secure for line transfer. We find that for conditions typical of the AGN or X-ray binary emission medium, all escape approximations commonly used lead to an overestimation of the soft X-ray lines which can reach one order of magnitude for intense lines.
  • Nayakshin & Kazanas (2002) have considered the time-dependent illumination of an accretion disc in Active Galactic Nuclei, in the lamppost model. We extend their study to the flare model, which postulates the release of a large X-ray flux above a small region of the accretion disc. A fundamental difference with the lamppost model is that the region of the disc below the flare is not illuminated before the onset of the flare. A few test models show that the spectrum which follows immediately the increase in continuum flux should display the characteristics of a highly illuminated but dense gas, i.e. very intense X-ray emission lines and ionization edges in the soft X-ray range. The behaviour of the iron line is different in the case of a "moderate" and a ``strong'' flare: for a moderate flare, the spectrum displays a neutral component of the Fe K$\alpha$ line at 6.4 keV, gradually leading to more highly ionized lines. For a strong flare, the lines are already emitted by FeXXV (around 6.7 keV) after the onset, and have an equivalent width of several hundreds of eV. We find that the observed correlations between $R$, $\Gamma$, and the X-ray flux, are well accounted by a combination of flares having not achieved pressure equilibrium, strongly suggesting that the observed spectrum is dominated by regions in non-pressure equilibrium, typical of the onset of the flares. Finally a flare being confined to a small region of the disc, the spectral lines should be narrow (except for a weak Compton broadening), Doppler shifted, and moving.
  • In a previous paper, Collin & Hur\'e (2001), using a sample of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) where the mass has been determined by reverberation studies (Kaspi et al. 2000), have shown that if the optical luminosity is emitted by a steady accretion disc, about half of the objects are accreting close to or higher than the Eddington rate. We conclude here that this result is unavoidable, unless the masses are strongly underestimated by reverberation studies, which does not seem to be the case. There are three issues to the problem: 1. Accretion proceeds at Eddington or super-Eddington rates through thick discs. Several consequences follow: an anti-correlation between the line widths of the lines and the Eddington ratios, and a decrease of the Eddington ratio with an increasing black hole mass. Extrapolated to all quasars, these results imply that the amount of mass locked in massive black holes should be larger than presently thought. 2. The optical luminosity is not produced directly by the gravitational release of energy, and super-Eddington rates are not required. The optical luminosity has to be emitted by a dense and thick medium located at large distances from the center (10$^3$ to $10^4$ gravitational radii). It can be due to reprocessing of the X-ray photons from the central source in a geometrically thin warped disc, or in dense "blobs" forming a geometrically thick system, which can be a part of the accretion flow or the basis of an outflow. 3. Accretion discs are completely "non standard". Presently neither the predictions of models nor the observed spectral distributions are sufficient to help choosing between these solutions.