• Understanding the dynamics of interacting quantum spins has been one of the active areas of condensed matter physics research. Recently, extensive inelastic neutron scattering measurements have been carried out in an interesting class of systems, Cr_2(W, Te, Mo)O_6. These systems consist of bilayers of Cr^{3+} spins (S=3/2) with strong antiferromagnetic inter-bilayer coupling (J) and tuneable intra-bilayer coupling (j) from ferro (for W and Mo) to antiferro (for Te). In the limit when J>|j|, the system reduces to weakly interacting quantum spin-3/2 dimers. In this paper we discuss the low-temperature magnetic properties of Cr_2TeO_6 systems where both intra-layer and inter-layer exchange couplings are antiferromagnetic, i.e. J,j>0. Using linear spin-wave theory we obtain the magnon dispersion, sublattice magnetization, two-magnon density of states, and longitudinal spin-spin correlation function.
  • We present a new type of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) arising from an anomalous collapse of the Mott insulating state via a modest magnetic field in a bilayer ruthenate, Ti-doped Ca$_3$Ru$_2$O$_7$. Such an insulator-metal transition is accompanied by changes in both lattice and magnetic structures. Our findings have important implications because a magnetic field usually stabilizes the insulating ground state in a Mott-Hubbard system, thus calling for a deeper theoretical study to reexamine the magnetic field tuning of Mott systems with magnetic and electronic instabilities and spin-lattice-charge coupling. This study further provides a model approach to search for CMR systems other than manganites, such as Mott insulators in the vicinity of the boundary between competing phases.
  • GeCu2O4 exhibits a tetragonal spinel structure due to the strong Jahn-Teller distortion associated with Cu2+ ions. We show that its magnetic structure can be described as slabs composed of a pair of layers with orthogonally oriented spin 1/2 Cu chains in the basal ab plane. The spins between the two layers within a slab are collinearly aligned while the spin directions of neighboring slabs are perpendicular to each other. Interestingly, we find that spins along each chain form an unusual up-up-down-down (UUDD) pattern, suggesting a non-negligible nearest-neighbor biquadratic exchange interaction in the effective classical spin Hamiltonian. We hypothesize that spin-orbit coupling and orbital mixing of Cu2+ ions in this system is non-negligible, which calls for future calculations using perturbation theory with extended Hilbert (spin and orbital) space and calculations based on density functional theory including spin-orbit coupling and looking at the global stability of the UUDD state.
  • The compositional ordering of Ag, Pb, Sb, Te ions in (AgSbTe$_{2}$)$_{x}$(PbTe)$_{2(1-x)}$ systems possessing a NaCl structure is studied using a Coulomb lattice gas (CLG) model on a face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice and Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show different possible microstructural orderings. Ordered superlattice structures formed out of AgSbTe$_{2}$ layers separated by Pb$_{2}$Te$_{2}$ layers are observed for a large range of $x$ values. For $x=0.5$, we see an array of tubular structures formed by AgSbTe$_{2}$ and Pb$_{2}$Te$_{2}$ blocks. For $x=1$, AgSbTe$_{2}$ has a body-centered tetragonal (bct) structure which is in agreement with previous Monte Carlo simulation results for restricted primitive model (RPM) at closed packed density. The phase diagram of this frustrated CLG system is discussed.
  • We report the complex magnetic phase diagram and electronic structure of Cr2(Te1-xWx)O6 systems. While compounds with different x values possess the same crystal structure, they display different magnetic structures below and above xc = 0.7, where both the transition temperature TN and sublattice magnetization (Ms) reach a minimum. Unlike many known cases where magnetic interactions are controlled either by injection of charge carriers or by structural distortion induced via chemical doping, in the present case it is achieved by tuning the orbital hybridization between Cr 3d and O 2p orbitals through W 5d states. The result is supported by ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Through this concept, we introduce a new approach to tune magnetic and electronic properties via chemical doping.
  • Electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of marcasite (m) and synthetic pyrite (p) phases of FeX$_2$ (X=Se,Te) have been investigated using first principles density functional theory and Boltzmann transport equation. The plane wave pseudopotential approximation was used to study the structural properties and full-potential linear augmented plane wave method was used to obtain the electronic structure and thermoelectric properties (thermopower and power factor scaled by relaxation time). From total energy calculations we find that m-FeSe$_2$ and m-FeTe$_2$ are stable at ambient conditions and no structural transition from marcasite to pyrite is seen under the application of hydrostatic pressure. The calculated ground state structural properties agree quite well with available experiments. From the calculated thermoelectric properties, we find that both m and p forms are good candidates for thermoelectric applications. However, hole doped m-FeSe$_2$ appears to be the best among all the four systems.
  • An interesting class of tetrahedrally coordinated ternary compounds have attracted considerable interest because of their potential as good thermoelectrics. These compounds, denoted as I$_3$-V-VI$_4$, contain three monovalent-I (Cu, Ag), one nominally pentavalent-V (P, As, Sb, Bi), and four hexavalent-VI (S, Se, Te) atoms; and can be visualized as ternary derivatives of the II-VI zincblende or wurtzite semiconductors, obtained by starting from four unit cells of (II-VI) and replacing four type II atoms by three type I and one type V atoms. In trying to understand their electronic structures and transport properties, some fundamental questions arise: whether V atoms are indeed pentavalent and if not how do these compounds become semiconductors, what is the role of V lone pair electrons in the origin of band gaps, and what are the general characteristics of states near the valence band maxima and the conduction band minima. We answer some of these questions using ab initio calculations (density functional methods with both local and nonlocal exchange-correlation potential).
  • The semimetallic Group V elements display a wealth of correlated electron phenomena due to a small indirect band overlap that leads to relatively small, but equal, numbers of holes and electrons at the Fermi energy with high mobility. Their electronic bonding characteristics produce a unique crystal structure, the rhombohedral A7 structure, which accommodates lone pairs on each site. Here we show that the A7 structure can display chemical ordering of Sb and As, which were previously thought to mix randomly. Our structural characterization of the compound SbAs is performed by single-crystal and high-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and neutron and x-ray pair distribution function analysis. All least-squares refinements indicate ordering of Sb and As, resulting in a GeTe-type structure without inversion symmetry. High-temperature diffraction studies reveal an ordering transition around 550 K. Transport and infrared reflectivity measurements, along with first-principles calculations, confirm that SbAs is a semimetal, albeit with a direct band separation larger than that of Sb or As. Because even subtle substitutions in the semimetals, notably Bi_{1-x}Sb_x, can open semiconducting energy gaps, a further investigation of the interplay between chemical ordering and electronic structure on the A7 lattice is warranted.
  • A pair of magnetic atoms with canted spins Sa, Sb can give rise to an electric dipole moment P. Several forms for the behavior of such a moment have appeared in the theoretical literature, some of which have been invoked to explain experimental results found in various multiferroic materials. The forms specifically are P1 ~ R x (Sa x Sb); P2 ~ Sa x Sb, and P3 ~ Sa (R . Sa) - Sb (R . Sb), where R is the relative position of the atoms and Sa, Sb are unit vectors. To unify and generalize these various forms we consider P as the most general quadratic function of the spin components that vanishes whenever Sa and Sb are collinear, i.e. we consider the most general expressions that require spin canting. The study reveals new forms. We generalize to the vector P, Moriya's symmetry considerations regarding the (scalar) Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya energy D. Sa x Sb (which led to restrictions on D). This provides a rigorous symmetry argument which shows that P1 is allowed no matter how high the symmetry of the atoms plus environment, and gives restrictions for all other contributions. The analysis leads to the suggestion of terms omitted in the existing microscopic models, suggests a new mechanism behind the ferroelectricity found in the 'proper screw structure' of CuXO2, X=Fe, Cr, and predicts an unusual antiferroelectric ordering in the antiferromagnetically and ferroelectrically ordered phase of RbFe(MoO4)2.
  • The ground state phase diagram is determined exactly for the frustrated classical Heisenberg model plus nearest-neighbor biquadratic exchange interactions on a 2-dimensional lattice. A square- and a rhombic-symmetry version are considered. There appear ferromagnetic, incommensurate-spiral, "up-up-down-down" (uudd) and canted ferromagnetic states, a non-spiral coplanar state that is an ordered vortex lattice, plus a non-coplanar ordered state (a "conical vortex lattice"). In the rhombic case, which adds biquadratic terms to the Heisenberg model used widely for insulating manganites, the uudd state found is the E-type state observed; this along with accounting essentially for the variety of ground states found in these materials, shows that this model probably contains the long-sought mechanism behind the uudd state.
  • Complex multicomponent systems based on PbTe, SnTe, and GeTe are of great interest for infrared devices and high-temperature thermoelectric applications. A deeper understanding of the atomic and electronic structure of these materials is crucial for explaining, predicting, and optimizing their properties, and to suggest new materials for better performance. In this work, we present our first-principles studies of the energy bands associated with various monovalent (Na, K, and Ag) and trivalent (Sb and Bi) impurities and impurity clusters in PbTe, SnTe, and GeTe using supercell models. We find that monovalent and trivalent impurity atoms tend to come close to one another and form impurity-rich clusters, and the electronic structure of the host materials is strongly perturbed by the impurities. There are impurity-induced bands associated with the trivalent impurities that split off from the conduction-band bottom with large shifts towards the valence-band top. This is due to the interaction between the $p$ states of the trivalent impurity cation and the divalent anion which tends to drive the systems towards metallicity. The introduction of monovalent impurities (in the presence of trivalent impurities) significantly reduces (in PbTe and GeTe) or slightly enhances (in SnTe) the effect of the trivalent impurities. One, therefore, can tailor the band gap and band structure near the band gap (hence transport properties) by choosing the type of impurity and its concentration or tuning the monovalent/trivalent ratio. Based on the calculated band structures, we are able to explain qualitatively the measured transport properties of the whole class of PbTe-, SnTe-, and GeTe-based bulk thermoelectrics.
  • We discuss the mechanism responsible for the observed improvement in the structural properties of In doped GaSe, a layered material of great current interest. Formation energy calculations show that by tuning the Fermi energy, In can substitute for Ga or can go as an interstitial charged defect$(\text{In}_{\text{i}}^{\text{3+}})$. We find that $\text{In}_{\text{i}}^{\text{3+}}$ dramatically increases the shear stiffness of GaSe, explaining the observed enhancement in the rigidity of In doped p-GaSe. The mechanism responsible for rigidity enhancement discussed here is quite general and applicable to a large class of layered solids with weak interlayer bonding.
  • Interesting magnetic structure found experimentally in a series of manganites RMnO$_3$, where R is a rare earth, was explained, ostensibly, by Kimura et al, in terms of a classical Heisenberg model with an assumed set of exchange parameters, nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interactions, $J_n$. They calculated a phase diagram as a function of these parameters for the ground state, in which the important "up-up-down-down" or E-phase occurs for finite ratios of the $J_n$. In this Comment we show that this state does not occur for such ratios; the error is traced to an incorrect method for minimizing the energy. The correct phase diagram is given. We also point out that the finite temperature phase diagram presented there is incorrect.
  • We have studied the nature of the surface charge distribution in CeTe3. This is a simple, cleavable, layered material with a robust one-dimensional incommensurate charge density wave (CDW). Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been applied on the exposed surface of a cleaved single crystal. At 77 K, the STM images show both the atomic lattice of surface Te atoms arranged in a square net and the CDW modulations oriented at 45 degrees with respect to the Te net. Fourier transform of the STM data shows Te square lattice peaks, and peaks related to the CDW oriented at 45 degrees to the lattice peaks. In addition, clear peaks are present, consistent with subsurface structure and wave vector mixing effects. These data are supported by electronic structure calculations, which show that the subsurface signal most likely arises from a lattice of Ce atoms situated 2.53 angstroms below the surface Te net.
  • We use different types of determinantal Hartree-Fock (HF) wave functions to calculate variational bounds for the ground state energy of spin-half fermions in volume V_0, with mass m, electric charge zero, and magnetic moment mu, which are interacting through long range magnetic dipole-dipole interaction. We find that at high densities when the average inter particle distance r_0 becomes small compared to the magnetic length r_m, a ferromagnetic state with spheroidal occupation function, involving quadrupolar deformation, gives a lower energy compared to the variational energy for the uniform paramagnetic state. This HF variational bound to the ground state energy turns out to have a lower energy than our earlier calculation in which instead of a determinantal wavefunction we had used a positive semi-definite single particle density matrix operator whose eigenvalues, having quadrupolar deformation, were allowed to take any value from 0 to 1. This system is of course still unstable towards infinite density collapse, but we show here explicitly that a suitable short range repulsive (hard core) interaction of strength U_0 and range a can stop this collapse.The existence of a stable high density ferromagnetic state with spheroidal occupation function is possible as long as the ratio of hard-core and magnetic dipole coupling constants is not very small compared to 1.
  • A 2-site 2-electron model with s- and p-states on each site, having constrained average site-spins S_a, S_b, with angle theta between them, simpler than the previous closely-related model of Katsura et al (KNB), is considered. Intra-site Coulomb repulsion and inter-site spin-orbit coupling V_(SO) are included. The ground state has an electric dipole moment pi consistent with the result of KNB, pi proportional to R x (S_a x S_b) = f, R connecting the two sites, and application to a spiral leads to ferroelectric polarization with direction f, also in agreement with the previous result. However, the present result shows the expected behavior pi goes to 0 as V_(SO) goes to 0, unlike the previous one.
  • Understanding the detailed electronic structure of deep defect states in narrow band-gap semiconductors has been a challenging problem. Recently, self-consistent ab initio calculations within density functional theory (DFT) using supercell models have been successful in tackling this problem. In this paper, we carry out such calculations in PbTe, a well-known narrow band-gap semiconductor, for a large class of defects: cationic and anionic substitutional impurities of different valence, and cationic and anionic vacancies. For the cationic defects, we study a series of compounds RPb2n-1Te2n, where R is vacancy or monovalent, divalent, or trivalent atom; for the anionic defects, we study compounds MPb2nTe2n-1, where M is vacancy, S, Se or I. We find that the density of states (DOS) near the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band get significantly modified for most of these defects. This suggests that the transport properties of PbTe in the presence of impurities can not be interpreted by simple carrier doping concepts, confirming such ideas developed from qualitative and semi-quantitative arguments.
  • Ab initio electronic structure calculations based on gradient corrected density functional theory were performed on a class of novel quaternary compounds AgPb$_{m}SbTe$_{2+m}$, which were found to be excellent high temperature thermoelctrics with large figure of merit ZT ~2.2 at 800K. We find that resonant states appear near the top of the valence and bottom of the conduction bands of bulk PbTe when Ag and Sb replace Pb. These states can be understood in terms of modified Te-Ag(Sb) bonds. Electronic structure near the gap depends sensitively on the microstructural arrangements of Ag-Sb atoms, suggesting that large ZT values may originate from the nature of these ordering arrangements.
  • Scanning tunneling spectroscopy images of Bi$_2$Se$_3$ doped with excess Bi reveal electronic defect states with a striking shape resembling clover leaves. With a simple tight-binding model we show that the geometry of the defect states in Bi$_2$Se$_3$ can be directly related to the position of the originating impurities. Only the Bi defects at the Se sites five atomic layers below the surface are experimentally observed. We show that this effect can be explained by the interplay of defect and surface electronic structure.