• Recent photometric analysis of the colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of young massive clusters (YMCs) have found evidence for splitting in the main sequence and extended main sequence turn-offs, both of which have been suggested to be caused by stellar rotation. Comparison of the observed main sequence splitting with models has led various authors to suggest a rather extreme stellar rotation distribution, with a minority ($10-30$\%) of stars with low rotational velocities and the remainder ($70-90$\%) of stars rotating near the critical rotation (i.e., near break-up). We test this hypothesis by searching for Be stars within two YMCs in the LMC (NGC 1850 and NGC 1856), which are thought to be critically rotating stars with decretion disks that are (partially) ionised by their host stars. In both clusters we detect large populations of Be stars at the main sequence turn-off ($\sim30-60$\% of stars), which supports previous suggestions of large populations of rapidly rotating stars within massive clusters.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations of SN2014C during the first 500 days. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays. SN2014C was the explosion of an H-stripped progenitor star with ordinary explosion parameters. However, over the time scale of ~1yr, SN2014C experienced a complete metamorphosis and evolved from an ordinary H-poor supernova of type Ib into a strongly interacting, H-rich supernova of type IIn. Signatures of the SN shock interacting with a dense medium are observed across the spectrum. Coordinated observations with Swift, Chandra and NuSTAR have captured the evolution in detail and revealed the presence of a massive shell of ~1 Msun of hydrogen-rich material at ~6d16 cm from the explosion site. We estimate that the shell was ejected by the progenitor star in the decades to centuries before core collapse. This result poses significant challenges to current theories of massive star evolution, as it requires a physical mechanism responsible for the ejection of the deepest hydrogen layer of H-poor SN progenitors synchronized with the onset of stellar collapse. Theoretical investigations point at binary interactions and/or instabilities during the last stages of nuclear burning in massive stars as potential triggers of the time-dependent mass loss. We constrain these scenarios utilizing the sample of 183 SNe Ib/c with public radio observations. Our analysis identifies SN2014C-like signatures in ~10% of SNe with constraining radio data. This fraction is somewhat larger but reasonably consistent with the expectation from the theory of recent envelope ejection due to binary evolution IF the ejected material can survive in the close environment for 1000-10000 yrs. Alternatively, nuclear burning instabilities extending all the way to the core C-burning phase might also play a critical role.
  • Massive rotating single stars with an initial metal composition appropriate for the dwarf galaxy I Zw 18 ([Fe/H]=$-$1.7) are modelled during hydrogen burning for initial masses of 9-300 M$_{\odot}$ and rotational velocities of 0-900 km s$^{-1}$. Internal mixing processes in these models were calibrated based on an observed sample of OB-type stars in the Magellanic Clouds. Even moderately fast rotators, which may be abundant at this metallicity, are found to undergo efficient mixing induced by rotation resulting in quasi chemically-homogeneous evolution. These homogeneously-evolving models reach effective temperatures of up to 90 kK during core hydrogen burning. This, together with their moderate mass-loss rates, make them Transparent Wind Ultraviolet INtense stars (TWUIN star), and their expected numbers might explain the observed HeII ionizing photon flux in I Zw 18 and other low-metallicity HeII galaxies. Our slowly rotating stars above $\sim$80 M$_{\odot}$ evolve into late B- to M-type supergiants during core hydrogen burning, with visual magnitudes up to 19$^{\mathrm{m}}$ at the distance of I Zw 18. Both types of stars, TWUIN stars and luminous late-type supergiants, are only predicted at low metallicity. Massive star evolution at low metallicity is shown to differ qualitatively from that in metal-rich environments. Our grid can be used to interpret observations of local star-forming dwarf galaxies and high-redshift galaxies, as well as the metal-poor components of our Milky Way and its globular clusters.
  • The Tarantula survey is an ESO Large Programme which has obtained multi-epochs spectroscopy of over 800 massive stars in the 30 Dor region in the Large Magelanic Cloud. Here we briefly describe the main drivers of the survey and the observational material derived.
  • The Tarantula Survey is an ambitious ESO Large Programme that has obtained multi-epoch spectroscopy of over 1,000 massive stars in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Here we introduce the scientific motivations of the survey and give an overview of the observational sample. Ultimately, quantitative analysis of every star, paying particular attention to the effects of rotational mixing and binarity, will be used to address fundamental questions in both stellar and cluster evolution.