• May 10, 2015 astro-ph.SR, astro-ph.IM
    The Public European Southern Observatory Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects (PESSTO) began as a public spectroscopic survey in April 2012. We describe the data reduction strategy and data products which are publicly available through the ESO archive as the Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 1 (SSDR1). PESSTO uses the New Technology Telescope with EFOSC2 and SOFI to provide optical and NIR spectroscopy and imaging. We target supernovae and optical transients brighter than 20.5mag for classification. Science targets are then selected for follow-up based on the PESSTO science goal of extending knowledge of the extremes of the supernova population. The EFOSC2 spectra cover 3345-9995A (at resolutions of 13-18 Angs) and SOFI spectra cover 0.935-2.53 micron (resolutions 23-33 Angs) along with JHK imaging. This data release contains spectra from the first year (April 2012 - 2013), consisting of all 814 EFOSC2 spectra and 95 SOFI spectra (covering 298 distinct objects), in standard ESO Phase 3 format. We estimate the accuracy of the absolute flux calibrations for EFOSC2 to be typically 15%, and the relative flux calibration accuracy to be about 5%. The PESSTO standard NIR reduction process does not yet produce high accuracy absolute spectrophotometry but the SOFI JHK imaging will improve this. Future data releases will focus on improving the automated flux calibration of the data products.
  • We present optical observations of the peculiar Type Ibn supernova (SN Ibn) OGLE-2012-SN-006, discovered and monitored by the OGLE-IV survey, and spectroscopically followed by PESSTO at late phases. Stringent pre-discovery limits constrain the explosion epoch with fair precision to JD = 2456203.8 +- 4.0. The rise time to the I-band light curve maximum is about two weeks. The object reaches the peak absolute magnitude M(I) = -19.65 +- 0.19 on JD = 2456218.1 +- 1.8. After maximum, the light curve declines for about 25 days with a rate of 4 mag per 100d. The symmetric I-band peak resembles that of canonical Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe), whereas SNe Ibn usually exhibit asymmetric and narrower early-time light curves. Since 25 days past maximum, the light curve flattens with a decline rate slower than that of the 56Co to 56Fe decay, although at very late phases it steepens to approach that rate. An early-time spectrum is dominated by a blue continuum, with only a marginal evidence for the presence of He I lines marking this SN Type. This spectrum shows broad absorptions bluewards than 5000A, likely O II lines, which are similar to spectral features observed in super-luminous SNe at early epochs. The object has been spectroscopically monitored by PESSTO from 90 to 180 days after peak, and these spectra show the typical features observed in a number of SN 2006jc-like events, including a blue spectral energy distribution and prominent and narrow (v(FWHM) ~ 1900 km/s) He I emission lines. This suggests that the ejecta are interacting with He-rich circumstellar material. The detection of broad (10000 km/s) O I and Ca II features likely produced in the SN ejecta (including the [O I] 6300A,6364A doublet in the latest spectra) lends support to the interpretation of OGLE-2012-SN-006 as a core-collapse event.
  • In this letter we present an optical spectrum of SN 2011fe taken 1034 d after the explosion, several hundred days later than any other spectrum of a Type Ia supernova (disregarding light-echo spectra and local-group remnants). The spectrum is still dominated by broad emission features, with no trace of a light echo or interaction of the supernova ejecta with surrounding interstellar material. Comparing this extremely late spectrum to an earlier one taken 331 d after the explosion, we find that the most prominent feature at 331 d - [Fe III] emission around 4700 A - has entirely faded away, suggesting a significant change in the ionisation state. Instead, [Fe II] lines are probably responsible for most of the emission at 1034 d. An emission feature at 6300-6400 A has newly developed at 1034 d, which we tentatively identify with Fe I {\lambda}6359, [Fe I] {\lambda}{\lambda}6231, 6394 or [O I] {\lambda}{\lambda}6300, 6364. Interestingly, the features in the 1034-d spectrum seem to be collectively redshifted, a phenomenon that we currently have no convincing explanation for. We discuss the implications of our findings for explosion models, but conclude that sophisticated spectral modelling is required for any firm statement.
  • Spectroscopic and photometric observations of the nearby Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) SN 2014J are presented. Spectroscopic observations were taken -8 to +10 d relative to B-band maximum, using FRODOSpec, a multi-purpose integral-field unit spectrograph. The observations range from 3900 AA to 9000 AA. SN 2014J is located in M82 which makes it the closest SN Ia studied in at least the last 28 years. It is a spectrosopically normal SN Ia with high velocity features. We model the spectra of SN 2014J with a Monte Carlo (MC) radiative transfer code, using the abundance tomography technique. SN 2014J is highly reddened, with a host galaxy extinction of E(B-V)=1.2 (R_V=1.38). It has a $\Delta$m_15(B) of 1.08$\pm$0.03 when corrected for extinction. As SN 2014J is a normal SN Ia, the density structure of the classical W7 model was selected. The model and photometric luminosities are both consistent with B-band maximum occurring on JD 2456690.4$\pm$0.12. The abundance of the SN 2014J behaves like other normal SN Ia, with significant amounts of silicon (12% by mass) and sulphur (9% by mass) at high velocities (12300 km s$^{-1}$) and the low-velocity ejecta (v<6500 km s$^{-1}$) consists almost entirely of $^{56}$Ni.
  • We present optical photometry and spectra of the super luminous type II/IIn supernova CSS121015:004244+132827 (z=0.2868) spanning epochs from -30 days (rest frame) to more than 200 days after maximum. CSS121015 is one of the more luminous supernova ever found and one of the best observed. The photometric evolution is characterized by a relatively fast rise to maximum (~40 days in the SN rest frame), and by a linear post-maximum decline. The light curve shows no sign of a break to an exponential tail. A broad Halpha is first detected at ~ +40 days (rest-frame). Narrow, barely-resolved Balmer and [O III] 5007 A lines, with decreasing strength, are visible along the entire spectral evolution. The spectra are very similar to other super luminous supernovae (SLSNe) with hydrogen in their spectrum, and also to SN 2005gj, sometimes considered a type Ia interacting with H-rich CSM. The spectra are also similar to a subsample of H-deficient SLSNe. We propose that the properties of CSS121015 are consistent with the interaction of the ejecta with a massive, extended, opaque shell, lost by the progenitor decades before the final explosion, although a magnetar powered model cannot be excluded. Based on the similarity of CSS121015 with other SLSNe (with and without H), we suggest that the shocked-shell scenario should be seriously considered as a plausible model for both types of SLSN.
  • In this letter a late-phase spectrum of SN 2010lp, a subluminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), is presented and analysed. As in 1991bg-like SNe Ia at comparable epochs, the spectrum is characterised by relatively broad [FeII] and [CaII] emission lines. However, instead of narrow [FeIII] and [CoIII] lines that dominate the emission from the innermost regions of 1991bg-like SNe, SN 2010lp shows [OI] 6300,6364 emission, usually associated with core-collapse SNe and never observed in a subluminous thermonuclear explosion before. The [OI] feature has a complex profile with two strong, narrow emission peaks. This suggests oxygen to be distributed in a non-spherical region close to the centre of the ejecta, severely challenging most thermonuclear explosion models discussed in the literature. We conclude that given these constraints violent mergers are presently the most promising scenario to explain SN 2010lp.
  • H and He features in photospheric spectra have seldom been used to infer quantitatively the properties of Type IIb, Ib and Ic supernovae (SNe IIb, Ib and Ic) and their progenitor stars. Most radiative transfer models ignored NLTE effects, which are extremely strong especially in the He-dominated zones. In this paper, a comprehensive set of model atmospheres for low-mass SNe IIb/Ib/Ic is presented. Long-standing questions such as how much He can be contained in SNe Ic, where He lines are not seen, can thus be addressed. The state of H and He is computed in full NLTE, including the effect of heating by fast electrons. The models are constructed to represent iso-energetic explosions of the same stellar core with differently massive H/He envelopes on top. The synthetic spectra suggest that 0.06 - 0.14 M_sun of He and even smaller amounts of H suffice for optical lines to be present, unless ejecta asymmetries play a major role. This strongly supports the conjecture that low-mass SNe Ic originate from binaries where progenitor mass loss can be extremely efficient.
  • Radiative transfer studies of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) hold the promise of constraining both the time-dependent density profile of the SN ejecta and its stratification by element abundance which, in turn, may discriminate between different explosion mechanisms and progenitor classes. Here we present a detailed analysis of Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet (UV) and ground-based optical spectra and light curves of the SN Ia SN 2010jn (PTF10ygu). SN 2010jn was discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) 15 days before maximum light, allowing us to secure a time-series of four UV spectra at epochs from -11 to +5 days relative to B-band maximum. The photospheric UV spectra are excellent diagnostics of the iron-group abundances in the outer layers of the ejecta, particularly those at very early times. Using the method of 'Abundance Tomography' we have derived iron-group abundances in SN 2010jn with a precision better than in any previously studied SN Ia. Optimum fits to the data can be obtained if burned material is present even at high velocities, including significant mass fractions of iron-group elements. This is consistent with the slow decline rate (or high 'stretch') of the light curve of SN 2010jn, and consistent with the results of delayed-detonation models. Early-phase UV spectra and detailed time-dependent series of further SNe Ia offer a promising probe of the nature of the SN Ia mechanism.
  • In the ultraviolet (UV), Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) show a much larger diversity in their properties than in the optical. Using a stationary Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code, a grid of spectra at maximum light was created varying bolometric luminosity and the amount of metals in the outer layers of the SN ejecta. This model grid is then compared to a sample of high-redshift SNe Ia in order to test whether the observed diversities can be explained by luminosity and metallicity changes alone. The dispersion in broadband UV flux and colours at approximately constant optical spectrum can be readily matched by the model grid. In particular, the UV1-b colour is found to be a good tracer of metal content of the outer ejecta, which may in turn reflect on the metallicity of the SN progenitor. The models are less successful in reproducing other observed trends, such as the wavelengths of key UV features, which are dominated by reverse fluorescence photons from the optical, or intermediate band photometric indices. This can be explained in terms of the greater sensitivity of these detailed observables to modest changes in the relative abundances. Specifically, no single element is responsible for the observed trends. Due to their complex origin, these trends do not appear to be good indicators of either luminosity or metallicity.
  • The nearby supernova SN 2011fe can be observed in unprecedented detail. Therefore, it is an important test case for Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) models, which may bring us closer to understanding the physical nature of these objects. Here, we explore how available and expected future observations of SN 2011fe can be used to constrain SN Ia explosion scenarios. We base our discussion on three-dimensional simulations of a delayed detonation in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf and of a violent merger of two white dwarfs-realizations of explosion models appropriate for two of the most widely-discussed progenitor channels that may give rise to SNe Ia. Although both models have their shortcomings in reproducing details of the early and near-maximum spectra of SN 2011fe obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory), the overall match with the observations is reasonable. The level of agreement is slightly better for the merger, in particular around maximum, but a clear preference for one model over the other is still not justified. Observations at late epochs, however, hold promise for discriminating the explosion scenarios in a straightforward way, as a nucleosynthesis effect leads to differences in the 55Co production. SN 2011fe is close enough to be followed sufficiently long to study this effect.
  • The interpretation of supernova (SN) spectra is essential for deriving SN ejecta properties such as density and composition, which in turn can tell us about their progenitors and the explosion mechanism. A very large number of atomic processes are important for spectrum formation. Several tools for calculating SN spectra exist, but they mainly focus on the very early or late epochs. The intermediate phase, which requires a NLTE treatment of radiation transport has rarely been studied. In this paper we present a new SN radiation transport code, NERO, which can look at those epochs. All the atomic processes are treated in full NLTE, under a steady-state assumption. This is a valid approach between roughly 50 and 500 days after the explosion depending on SN type. This covers the post-maximum photospheric and the early and the intermediate nebular phase. As a test, we compare NERO to the radiation transport code of Jerkstrand et al. (2011) and to the nebular code of Mazzali et al. (2001). All three codes have been developed independently and a comparison provides a valuable opportunity to investigate their reliability. Currently, NERO is one-dimensional and can be used for predicting spectra of synthetic explosion models or for deriving SN properties by spectral modelling. To demonstrate this, we study the spectra of the 'normal' SN Ia 2005cf between 50 and 350 days after the explosion and identify most of the common SN Ia line features at post maximum epochs.
  • The optical and near-infrared late-time spectrum of the under-luminous Type Ia supernova 2003hv is analysed with a code that computes nebular emission from a supernova nebula. Synthetic spectra based on the classical explosion model W7 are unable to reproduce the large \FeIII/\FeII\ ratio and the low infrared flux at $\sim 1$ year after explosion, although the optical spectrum of SN\,2003hv is reproduced reasonably well for a supernova of luminosity intermediate between normal and subluminous (SN\,1991bg-like) ones. A possible solution is that the inner layers of the supernova ejecta ($v \lsim 8000$\,\kms) contain less mass than predicted by classical explosion models like W7. If this inner region contains $\sim 0.5 \Msun$ of material, as opposed to $\sim 0.9 \Msun$ in Chandrasekhar-mass models developed within the Single Degenerate scenario, the low density inhibits recombination, favouring the large \FeIII/\FeII\ ratio observed in the optical, and decreases the flux in the \FeII\ lines which dominate the IR spectrum. The most likely scenario may be an explosion of a sub-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf. Alternatively, the violent/dynamical merger of two white dwarfs with combined mass exceeding the Chandrasekhar limit also shows a reduced inner density.
  • The origin of subluminous Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) has long eluded any explanation, as all Chandrasekhar-mass models have severe problems reproducing them. Recently, it has been proposed that violent mergers of two white dwarfs of 0.9 M_sun could lead to subluminous SNe Ia events that resemble 1991bg-like SNe~Ia. Here we investigate whether this scenario still works for mergers of two white dwarfs with a mass ratio smaller than one. We aim to determine the range of mass ratios for which a detonation still forms during the merger, as only those events will lead to a SN Ia. This range is an important ingredient for population synthesis and one decisive point to judge the viability of the scenario. In addition, we perform a resolution study of one of the models. Finally we discuss the connection between violent white dwarf mergers with a primary mass of 0.9 M_sun and 1991bg-like SNe Ia. The latest version of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code Gadget3 is used to evolve binary systems with different mass ratios until they merge. We analyze the result and look for hot spots in which detonations can form. We show that mergers of two white dwarfs with a primary white dwarf mass of ~0.9 M_sun and a mass ratio larger than about $0.8$ robustly reach the conditions we require to ignite a detonation and thus produce thermonuclear explosions during the merger itself. We also find that while our simulations do not yet completely resolve the hot spots, increasing the resolution leads to conditions that are even more likely to ignite detonations. (abridged)
  • SN 2009dc shares similarities with normal Type Ia supernovae, but is clearly overluminous, with a (pseudo-bolometric) peak luminosity of log(L) = 43.47 [erg/s]. Its light curves decline slowly over half a year after maximum light, and the early-time near-IR light curves show secondary maxima, although the minima between the first and second peaks are not very pronounced. Bluer bands exhibit an enhanced fading after ~200 d, which might be caused by dust formation or an unexpectedly early IR catastrophe. The spectra of SN 2009dc are dominated by intermediate-mass elements and unburned material at early times, and by iron-group elements at late phases. Strong C II lines are present until ~2 weeks past maximum, which is unprecedented in thermonuclear SNe. The ejecta velocities are significantly lower than in normal and even subluminous SNe Ia. No signatures of CSM interaction are found in the spectra. Assuming that the light curves are powered by radioactive decay, analytic modelling suggests that SN 2009dc produced ~1.8 solar masses of 56Ni assuming the smallest possible rise time of 22 d. Together with a derived total ejecta mass of ~2.8 solar masses, this confirms that SN 2009dc is a member of the class of possible super-Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia similar to SNe 2003fg, 2006gz and 2007if. A study of the hosts of SN 2009dc and other superluminous SNe Ia reveals a tendency of these SNe to explode in low-mass galaxies. A low metallicity of the progenitor may therefore be an important pre-requisite for producing superluminous SNe Ia. We discuss a number of explosion scenarios, ranging from super-Chandrasekhar-mass white-dwarf progenitors over dynamical white-dwarf mergers and Type I 1/2 SNe to a core-collapse origin of the explosion. None of the models seem capable of explaining all properties of SN 2009dc, so that the true nature of this SN and its peers remains nebulous.
  • Supernovae of Type IIb contain large fractions of helium and traces of hydrogen, which can be observed in the early and late spectra. Estimates of the hydrogen and helium mass and distribution are mainly based on early-time spectroscopy and are uncertain since the respective lines are usually observed in absorption. Constraining the mass and distribution of H and He is important to gain insight into the progenitor systems of these SNe. We implement a NLTE treatment of hydrogen and helium in a three-dimensional nebular code. Ionisation, recombination, (non-)thermal electron excitation and H$\alpha$ line scattering are taken into account to compute the formation of H$\alpha$, which is by far the strongest H line observed in the nebular spectra of SNe IIb. Other lines of H and He are also computed but are rarely identified in the nebular phase. Nebular models are computed for the Type IIb SNe 1993J, 2001ig, 2003bg and 2008ax as well as for SN 2007Y, which shows H$\alpha$ absorption features at early times and strong H$\alpha$ emission in its late phase, but has been classified as a SN Ib. We suggest to classify SN 2007Y as a SN IIb. Optical spectra exist for all SNe of our sample, and there is one IR nebular observation of SN 2008ax, which allows an exploration of its helium mass and distribution. We develop a three-dimensional model for SN 2008ax. We obtain estimates for the total mass and kinetic energy in good agreement with the results from light-curve modelling found in the literature. We further derive abundances of He, C, O, Ca and $^{56}$Ni. We demonstrate that H$\alpha$ absorption is probably responsible for the double-peaked profile of the [O {\sc i}] $\lambda\lambda$ 6300, 6363 doublet in several SNe IIb and present a mechanism alternative to shock interaction for generating late-time H$\alpha$ emission of SNe IIb.
  • In order to assess qualitatively the ejecta geometry of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae, we investigate 98 late-time spectra of 39 objects, many of them previously unpublished. We perform a Gauss-fitting of the [O I] 6300, 6364 feature in all spectra, with the position, full width at half maximum (FWHM) and intensity of the 6300 Gaussian as free parameters, and the 6364 Gaussian added appropriately to account for the doublet nature of the [O I] feature. On the basis of the best-fit parameters, the objects are organised into morphological classes, and we conclude that at least half of all Type Ib/c supernovae must be aspherical. Bipolar jet-models do not seem to be universally applicable, as we find too few symmetric double-peaked [O I] profiles. In some objects the [O I] line exhibits a variety of shifted secondary peaks or shoulders, interpreted as blobs of matter ejected at high velocity and possibly accompanied by neutron-star kicks to assure momentum conservation. At phases earlier than ~200d, a systematic blueshift of the [O I] 6300, 6364 line centroids can be discerned. Residual opacity provides the most convincing explanation of this phenomenon, photons emitted on the rear side of the SN being scattered or absorbed on their way through the ejecta. Once modified to account for the doublet nature of the oxygen feature, the profile of Mg I] 4571 at sufficiently late phases generally resembles that of [O I] 6300, 6364, suggesting negligible contamination from other lines and confirming that O and Mg are similarly distributed within the ejecta.
  • Optical observations of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2005bl in NGC 4070, obtained from -6 to +66 d with respect to the B-band maximum, are presented. The photometric evolution is characterised by rapidly-declining light curves and red colours at peak and soon thereafter. With M_B,max = -17.24 the SN is an underluminous SN Ia, similar to the peculiar SNe 1991bg and 1999by. This similarity also holds for the spectroscopic appearance, the only remarkable difference being the likely presence of carbon in pre-maximum spectra of SN 2005bl. A comparison study among underluminous SNe Ia is performed, based on a number of spectrophotometric parameters. Previously reported correlations of the light-curve decline rate with peak luminosity and R(Si) are confirmed, and a large range of post-maximum Si II lambda6355 velocity gradients is encountered. 1D synthetic spectra for SN 2005bl are presented, which confirm the presence of carbon and suggest an overall low burning efficiency with a significant amount of leftover unburned material. Also, the Fe content in pre-maximum spectra is very low, which may point to a low metallicity of the precursor. Implications for possible progenitor scenarios of underluminous SNe Ia are briefly discussed.
  • The velocities and equivalent widths (EWs) of a set of absorption features are measured for a sample of 28 well-observed Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) covering a wide range of properties. The values of these quantities at maximum are obtained through interpolation/extrapolation and plotted against the decline rate, and so are various line ratios. The SNe are divided according to their velocity evolution into three classes defined in a previous work of Benetti et al.: low velocity gradient (LVG), high velocity gradient (HVG) and FAINT. It is found that all the LVG SNe have approximately uniform velocities at B maximum, while the FAINT SNe have values that decrease with increasing Delta m_15(B), and the HVG SNe have a large spread. The EWs of the Fe-dominated features are approximately constant in all SNe, while those of Intermediate mass element (IME) lines have larger values for intermediate decliners and smaller values for brighter and FAINT SNe. The HVG SNe have stronger Si II 6355-A lines, with no correlation with Delta m_15(B). It is also shown that the Si II 5972 A EW and three EW ratios, including one analogous to the R(Si II) ratio introduced by Nugent et al., are good spectroscopic indicators of luminosity. The data suggest that all LVG SNe have approximately constant kinetic energy, since burning to IME extends to similar velocities. The FAINT SNe may have somewhat lower energies. The large velocities and EWs of the IME lines of HVG SNe appear correlated with each other, but are not correlated with the presence of high-velocity features in the Ca II infrared triplet in the earliest spectra for the SNe for which such data exist.