• This paper describes the observations and the first data release (DR1) of the ESO public spectroscopic survey "VANDELS, a deep VIMOS survey of the CANDELS CDFS and UDS fields". VANDELS' main targets are star-forming galaxies at 2.4<z<5.5 and massive passive galaxies at 1<z<2.5. By adopting a strategy of ultra-long exposure times, from 20 to 80 hours per source, VANDELS is designed to be the deepest ever spectroscopic survey of the high-redshift Universe. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the VIMOS spectrograph, the survey has obtained ultra-deep spectra covering the wavelength 4800-10000 A with sufficient signal-to-noise to investigate the astrophysics of high-redshift galaxy evolution via detailed absorption line studies. The VANDELS-DR1 is the release of all spectra obtained during the first season of observations and includes data for galaxies for which the total (or half of the total) scheduled integration time was completed. The release contains 879 individual objects with a measured redshift and includes fully wavelength and flux-calibrated 1D spectra, the associated error spectra, sky spectra and wavelength-calibrated 2D spectra. We also provide a catalog with the essential galaxy parameters, including spectroscopic redshifts and redshift quality flags. In this paper we present the survey layout and observations, the data reduction and redshift measurement procedure and the general properties of the VANDELS-DR1 sample. We also discuss the spectroscopic redshift distribution, the accuracy of the photometric redshifts and we provide some examples of data products. All VANDELS-DR1 data are publicly available and can be retrieved from the ESO archive. Two further data releases are foreseen in the next 2 years with a final release scheduled for June 2020 which will include improved re-reduction of the entire spectroscopic data set. (abridged)
  • VANDELS is a uniquely-deep spectroscopic survey of high-redshift galaxies with the VIMOS spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The survey has obtained ultra-deep optical (0.48 < lambda < 1.0 micron) spectroscopy of ~2100 galaxies within the redshift interval 1.0 < z < 7.0, over a total area of ~0.2 sq. degrees centred on the CANDELS UDS and CDFS fields. Based on accurate photometric redshift pre-selection, 85% of the galaxies targeted by VANDELS were selected to be at z>=3. Exploiting the red sensitivity of the refurbished VIMOS spectrograph, the fundamental aim of the survey is to provide the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra necessary to measure key physical properties such as stellar population ages, masses, metallicities and outflow velocities from detailed absorption-line studies. Using integration times calculated to produce an approximately constant signal-to-noise ratio (20 < t_int < 80 hours), the VANDELS survey targeted: a) bright star-forming galaxies at 2.4 < z < 5.5, b) massive quiescent galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.5, c) fainter star-forming galaxies at 3.0 < z < 7.0 and d) X-ray/Spitzer-selected active galactic nuclei and Herschel-detected galaxies. By targeting two extragalactic survey fields with superb multi-wavelength imaging data, VANDELS will produce a unique legacy data set for exploring the physics underpinning high-redshift galaxy evolution. In this paper we provide an overview of the VANDELS survey designed to support the science exploitation of the first ESO public data release, focusing on the scientific motivation, survey design and target selection.
  • We present a 69 arcmin$^2$ ALMA survey at 1.1mm, GOODS-ALMA, matching the deepest HST-WFC3 H-band part of the GOODS-South field. We taper the 0"24 original image with a homogeneous and circular synthesized beam of 0"60 to reduce the number of independent beams - thus reducing the number of purely statistical spurious detections - and optimize the sensitivity to point sources. We extract a catalogue of galaxies purely selected by ALMA and identify sources with and without HST counterparts. ALMA detects 20 sources brighter than 0.7 mJy at 1.1mm in the 0"60 tapered mosaic (rms sensitivity $\sigma \simeq$ 0.18 mJy/beam) with a purity greater than 80%. Among these detections, we identify three sources with no HST nor Spitzer-IRAC counterpart, consistent with the expected number of spurious galaxies from the analysis of the inverted image; their definitive status will require additional investigation. An additional three sources with HST counterparts are detected either at high significance in the higher resolution map, or with different detection-algorithm parameters ensuring a purity greater than 80%. Hence we identify in total 20 robust detections. Our wide contiguous survey allows us to push further in redshift the blind detection of massive galaxies with ALMA with a median redshift of $\bar{z}$ = 2.92 and a median stellar mass of $\overline{M_{\star}}$ = 1.1 $\times 10^{11}$M$_\odot$. Our sample includes 20% HST-dark galaxies (4 out of 20), all detected in the mid-infrared with Spitzer-IRAC. The near-infrared based photometric redshifts of two of them ($z \sim$4.3 and 4.8) suggest that these sources have redshifts $z >$ 4. At least 40% of the ALMA sources host an X-ray AGN, compared to $\sim$14% for other galaxies of similar mass and redshift. The wide area of our ALMA survey provides lower values at the bright end of number counts than single-dish telescopes affected by confusion.
  • This paper provides an update of our previous scaling relations (Genzel et al.2015) between galaxy integrated molecular gas masses, stellar masses and star formation rates, in the framework of the star formation main-sequence (MS), with the main goal to test for possible systematic effects. For this purpose our new study combines three independent methods of determining molecular gas masses from CO line fluxes, far-infrared dust spectral energy distributions, and ~1mm dust photometry, in a large sample of 1444 star forming galaxies (SFGs) between z=0 and 4. The sample covers the stellar mass range log(M*/M_solar)=9.0-11.8, and star formation rates relative to that on the MS, delta_MS=SFR/SFR(MS), from 10^{-1.3} to 10^{2.2}. Our most important finding is that all data sets, despite the different techniques and analysis methods used, follow the same scaling trends, once method-to-method zero point offsets are minimized and uncertainties are properly taken into account. The molecular gas depletion time t_depl, defined as the ratio of molecular gas mass to star formation rate, scales as (1+z)^{-0.6}x(delta_MS)^{-0.44}, and is only weakly dependent on stellar mass. The ratio of molecular-to-stellar mass mu_gas depends on (1+z)^{2.5}x (delta_MS)^{0.52}x(M*)^{-0.36}, which tracks the evolution of the specific star formation rate. The redshift dependence of mu_gas requires a curvature term, as may the mass-dependences of t_depl and mu_gas. We find no or only weak correlations of t_depl and mu_gas with optical size R or surface density once one removes the above scalings, but we caution that optical sizes may not be appropriate for the high gas and dust columns at high-z.
  • T. M. C. Abbott, F. B. Abdalla, S. Allam, A. Amara, J. Annis, J. Asorey, S. Avila, O. Ballester, M. Banerji, W. Barkhouse, L. Baruah, M. Baumer, K. Bechtol, M . R. Becker, A. Benoit-Lévy, G. M. Bernstein, E. Bertin, J. Blazek, S. Bocquet, D. Brooks, D. Brout, E. Buckley-Geer, D. L. Burke, V. Busti, R. Campisano, L. Cardiel-Sas, A. C arnero Rosell, M. Carrasco Kind, J. Carretero, F. J. Castander, R. Cawthon, C. Chang, C. Conselice, G. Costa, M. Crocce, C. E. Cunha, C. B. D'Andrea, L. N. da Costa, R. Das, G. Daues, T. M. Davis, C. Davis, J. De Vicente, D. L. DePoy, J. DeRose, S. Desai, H. T. Diehl, J. P. Dietrich, S. Dodelson, P. Doel, A. Drlica-Wagner, T. F. Eifler, A. E. Elliott, A. E. Evrard, A. Farahi, A. Fausti Neto, E. Fernandez, D. A. Finley, M. Fitzpatrick, B. Flaugher, R. J. Foley, P. Fosalba, D. N. Friedel, J. Frieman, J. García-Bellido, E. Gaz tanaga, D. W. Gerdes, T. Giannantonio, M. S. S. Gill, K. Glazebrook, D. A. Goldstein, M. Gower, D. Gruen, R. A. Gruendl, J. Gschwend, R. R. Gupta, G. Gutierrez, S. Hamilton, W. G. Hartley, S. R. Hinton, J. M. Hislop, D. Hollowood, K. Honscheid, B. Hoyle, D. Huterer, B. Jain, D. J. James, T. Jeltema, M. W. G. Johnson, M. D. Johnson, S. Juneau, T. Kacpr zak, S. Kent, G. Khullar, M. Klein, A. Kovacs, A. M. G. Koziol, E. Krause, A. Kremin, R. Kron, K. Kuehn, S. Kuhlmann, N. Kuropatkin, O. Lahav, J. Lasker, T. S. Li, R. T. Li, A. R. Liddle, M. Lima, H. Lin, P. López-Reyes, N. MacCrann, M. A. G. Maia, J. D. Maloney, M. Manera, M. March, J. Marriner, J. L. Marshall, P. Martini, T. McClintock, T. McKay, R . G. McMahon, P. Melchior, F. Menanteau, C. J. Miller, R. Miquel, J. J. Mohr, E. Morganson, J. Mould, E. Neilsen, R. C. Nichol, D. Nidever, R. Nikutta, F. Nogueira, B. Nord, P. Nugent, L. Nunes, R. L. C. Ogando, L. Old, K. Olsen, A. B. Pace, A. Palmese, F. Paz-Chinchón, H. V. Peiris, W. J. Percival, D. Petravick, A. A. Plazas, J. Poh, C. Pond, A. Por redon, A. Pujol, A. Refregier, K. Reil, P. M. Ricker, R. P. Rollins, A. K. Romer, A. Roodman, P. Rooney, A. J. Ross, E. S. Rykoff, M. Sako, E. Sanchez, M. L. Sanchez, B. Santiago, A. Saro, V. Scarpine, D. Scolnic, A. Scott, S. Serrano, I. Sevilla-Noarbe, E. Sheldon, N. Shipp, M.L. Silveira, R. C. Smith, J. A. Smith, M. Smith, M. Soares-Santos, F. Sobre ira, J. Song, A. Stebbins, E. Suchyta, M. Sullivan, M. E. C. Swanson, G. Tarle, J. Thaler, D. Thomas, R. C. Thomas, M. A. Troxel, D. L. Tucker, V. Vikram, A. K. Vivas, A. R. Wal ker, R. H. Wechsler, J. Weller, W. Wester, R. C. Wolf, H. Wu, B. Yanny, A. Zenteno, Y. Zhang, J. Zuntz
    We describe the first public data release of the Dark Energy Survey, DES DR1, consisting of reduced single epoch images, coadded images, coadded source catalogs, and associated products and services assembled over the first three years of DES science operations. DES DR1 is based on optical/near-infrared imaging from 345 distinct nights (August 2013 to February 2016) by the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the 4-m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. We release data from the DES wide-area survey covering ~5,000 sq. deg. of the southern Galactic cap in five broad photometric bands, grizY. DES DR1 has a median delivered point-spread function of g = 1.12, r = 0.96, i = 0.88, z = 0.84, and Y = 0.90 arcsec FWHM, a photometric precision of < 1% in all bands, and an astrometric precision of 151 mas. The median coadded catalog depth for a 1.95" diameter aperture at S/N = 10 is g = 24.33, r = 24.08, i = 23.44, z = 22.69, and Y = 21.44 mag. DES DR1 includes nearly 400M distinct astronomical objects detected in ~10,000 coadd tiles of size 0.534 sq. deg. produced from ~39,000 individual exposures. Benchmark galaxy and stellar samples contain ~310M and ~ 80M objects, respectively, following a basic object quality selection. These data are accessible through a range of interfaces, including query web clients, image cutout servers, jupyter notebooks, and an interactive coadd image visualization tool. DES DR1 constitutes the largest photometric data set to date at the achieved depth and photometric precision.
  • We present deep ALMA CO(5-4) observations of a main sequence, clumpy galaxy at z=1.5 in the HUDF. Thanks to the ~0.5" resolution of the ALMA data, we can link stellar population properties to the CO(5-4) emission on scales of a few kpc. We detect strong CO(5-4) emission from the nuclear region of the galaxy, consistent with the observed $L_{\rm IR}$-$L^{\prime}_{\rm CO(5-4)}$ correlation and indicating on-going nuclear star formation. The CO(5-4) gas component appears more concentrated than other star formation tracers or the dust distribution in this galaxy. We discuss possible implications of this difference in terms of star formation efficiency and mass build-up at the galaxy centre. Conversely, we do not detect any CO(5-4) emission from the UV-bright clumps. This might imply that clumps have a high star formation efficiency (although they do not display unusually high specific star formation rates) and are not entirely gas dominated, with gas fractions no larger than that of their host galaxy (~50%). Stellar feedback and disk instability torques funnelling gas towards the galaxy centre could contribute to the relatively low gas content. Alternatively, clumps could fall in a more standard star formation efficiency regime if their actual star-formation rates are lower than generally assumed. We find that clump star-formation rates derived with several different, plausible methods can vary by up to an order of magnitude. The lowest estimates would be compatible with a CO(5-4) non-detection even for main-sequence like values of star formation efficiency and gas content.
  • We explore the dependence of the incidence of moderate-luminosity ($L_{X} = 10^{41.9-43.7}$ erg s$^{-1}$) AGNs and the distribution of their accretion rates on host color at 0.5 < z < 2.5, using deep X-ray data in GOODS fields. We use extinction-corrected rest-frame U-V colors to divide both AGN hosts and non-AGN galaxies into red sequence (quiescent), green valley (transition), and blue cloud (star-forming) populations. We find that both the AGN fraction at fixed stellar mass and its evolution with redshift are dependent on host colors. Most notably, red galaxies have the lowest AGN fraction (~5\%) at z~1 yet with most rapid redshift evolution, increasing by a factor of 5 (~24\%) at z~2. Green galaxies exhibit the highest AGN fraction across all redshifts, which is most pronounced at z~2 with more than half of them hosting an AGN at $M_{*} > 10^{10.6} M_{\odot}$. Together with the high AGN fraction in red galaxies at z~2, this indicates that X-ray AGNs could be important in both transforming blue galaxies into red ones and subsequently maintaining their quiescence at high redshift. Furthermore, consistent with low-redshift studies, we find that the probability of hosting an AGN in the total galaxy population can be characterized by a universal Eddington ratio ($p(\lambda_{Edd}) \sim \lambda_{Edd}^{-0.4}$) and a moderate redshift evolution. Yet consistent with their different AGN fractions, different populations appear to also have different $p(\lambda_{Edd})$ with red galaxies exhibiting more rapid redshift evolution than green and blue ones. Evidence for a steeper power law of $p(\lambda_{Edd})$ in red galaxies is also presented, though larger samples are needed to confirm. These results suggest that the AGN accretion or the growth of supermassive black holes is related to their host properties, and may also influence their hosts in a different mode dependent on the host color.
  • We investigate the physical conditions of ionized gas in high-z star-forming galaxies using diagnostic diagrams based on the rest-frame optical emission lines. The sample consists of 701 galaxies with an Ha detection at $1.4\lesssim z\lesssim1.7$, from the FMOS-COSMOS survey, that represent the normal star-forming population over the stellar mass range $10^{9.6} \lesssim M_\ast/M_\odot \lesssim 10^{11.6}$ with those at $M_\ast>10^{11}~M_\odot$ being well sampled. We confirm an offset of the average location of star-forming galaxies in the BPT diagram ([OIII]/Hb vs. [NII]/Ha), primarily towards higher [OIII]/Hb, compared with local galaxies. Based on the [SII] ratio, we measure an electron density ($n_e=220^{+170}_{-130}~\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$), that is higher than that of local galaxies. Based on comparisons to theoretical models, we argue that changes in emission-line ratios, including the offset in the BPT diagram, are caused by a higher ionization parameter both at fixed stellar mass and at fixed metallicity with additional contributions from a higher gas density and possibly a hardening of the ionizing radiation field. Ionization due to AGNs is ruled out as assessed with Chandra. As a consequence, we revisit the mass-metallicity relation using [NII]/Ha and a new calibration including [NII]/[SII] as recently introduced by Dopita et al. Consistent with our previous results, the most massive galaxies ($M_\ast\gtrsim10^{11}~M_\odot$) are fully enriched, while those at lower masses have metallicities lower than local galaxies. Finally, we demonstrate that the stellar masses, metallicities and star formation rates of the FMOS sample are well fit with a physically-motivated model for the chemical evolution of star-forming galaxies.
  • We introduce a new color-selection technique to identify high-redshift, massive galaxies that are systematically missed by Lyman-break selection. The new selection is based on the H_{160} and IRAC 4.5um bands, specifically H - [4.5] > 2.25 mag. These galaxies, dubbed "HIEROs", include two major populations that can be separated with an additional J - H color. The populations are massive and dusty star-forming galaxies at z > 3 (JH-blue) and extremely dusty galaxies at z < 3 (JH-red). The 350 arcmin^2 of the GOODS-N and GOODS-S fields with the deepest HST/WFC3 and IRAC data contain 285 HIEROs down to [4.5] < 24 mag. We focus here primarily on JH-blue (z > 3) HIEROs, which have a median photometric redshift z ~4.4 and stellar massM_{*}~10^{10.6} Msun, and are much fainter in the rest-frame UV than similarly massive Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Their star formation rates (SFRs) reaches ~240 Msun yr^{-1} leading to a specific SFR, sSFR ~4.2 Gyr^{-1}, suggesting that the sSFRs for massive galaxies continue to grow at z > 2 but at a lower growth rate than from z=0 to z=2. With a median half-light radius of 2 kpc, including ~20% as compact as quiescent galaxies at similar redshifts, JH-blue HIEROs represent perfect star-forming progenitors of the most massive (M_{*} > 10^{11.2} Msun) compact quiescent galaxies at z ~ 3 and have the right number density. HIEROs make up ~60% of all galaxies with M_{*} > 10^{10.5} Msun identified at z > 3 from their photometric redshifts. This is five times more than LBGs with nearly no overlap between the two populations. While HIEROs make up 15-25% of the total SFR density at z ~ 4-5, they completely dominate the SFR density taking place in M_{*} >10^{10.5} Msun galaxies, and are therefore crucial to understanding the very early phase of massive galaxy formation.
  • Using deep Herschel and ALMA observations, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) distributions of X-ray selected AGN host galaxies at 0.5<z<1.5 and 1.5<z<4, comparing them to that of normal, star-forming (i.e., "main-sequence", or MS) galaxies. We find 34--55 per cent of AGNs in our sample have SFRs at least a factor of two below that of the average MS galaxy, compared to ~15 per cent of all MS galaxies, suggesting significantly different SFR distributions. Indeed, when both are modelled as log-normal distributions, the mass and redshift-normalised SFR distributions of X-ray AGNs are roughly twice as broad, and peak ~0.4 dex lower, than that of MS galaxies. However, like MS galaxies, the normalised SFR distribution of AGNs in our sample appears not to evolve with redshift. Despite X-ray AGNs and MS galaxies having different SFR distributions, the linear-mean SFR of AGNs derived from our distributions is remarkably consistent with that of MS galaxies, and thus with previous results derived from stacked Herschel data. This apparent contradiction is due to the linear-mean SFR being biased by bright outliers, and thus does not necessarily represent a true characterisation of the typical SFR of X-ray AGNs.
  • We present a spectroscopic survey of galaxies in the COSMOS field using the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS), a near-infrared instrument on the Subaru Telescope. Our survey is specifically designed to detect the Halpha emission line that falls within the H-band (1.6-1.8 um) spectroscopic window from star-forming galaxies with 1.4 < z < 1.7 and M_stellar>~10^10 Msolar. With the high multiplex capability of FMOS, it is now feasible to construct samples of over one thousand galaxies having spectroscopic redshifts at epochs that were previously challenging. The high-resolution mode (R~2600) effectively separates Halpha and [NII]6585 thus enabling studies of the gas-phase metallicity and photoionization state of the interstellar medium. The primary aim of our program is to establish how star formation depends on stellar mass and environment, both recognized as drivers of galaxy evolution at lower redshifts. In addition to the main galaxy sample, our target selection places priority on those detected in the far-infrared by Herschel/PACS to assess the level of obscured star formation and investigate, in detail, outliers from the star formation rate - stellar mass relation. Galaxies with Halpha detections are followed up with FMOS observations at shorter wavelengths using the J-long (1.11-1.35 um) grating to detect Hbeta and [OIII]5008 that provides an assessment of extinction required to measure star formation rates not hampered by dust, and an indication of embedded Active Galactic Nuclei. With 460 redshifts measured from 1153 spectra, we assess the performance of the instrument with respect to achieving our goals, discuss inherent biases in the sample, and detail the emission-line properties. Our higher-level data products, including catalogs and spectra, are available to the community.
  • The Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7) is a targeted survey probing the narrow-line regions (NLRs) of a representative sample of ~140 nearby (z<0.02) Seyfert galaxies by means of optical integral field spectroscopy. The survey is based on a homogeneous data set observed using the Wide Field Spectrograph WiFeS. The data provide a 25x38 arcsec$^2$ field-of-view around the galaxy centre at typically ~1.5 arcsec spatial resolution and cover a wavelength range between ~3400 - 7100 $\AA$ at spectral resolutions of ~100 km s$^{-1}$ and ~50 km s$^{-1}$ in the blue and red parts, respectively. The survey is primarily designed to study gas excitation and star formation around AGN, with a special focus on the shape of the AGN ionising continuum, the interaction between radio jets and the NLR gas, and the nature of nuclear LINER emission. We provide an overview of the current status of S7-based results and present new results for NGC 6300.
  • We propose a new method of pushing $Herschel$ to its faintest detection limits using universal trends in the redshift evolution of the far infrared over 24$\mu$m colours in the well-sampled GOODS-North field. An extension to other fields with less multi-wavelength information is presented. This method is applied here to raise the contribution of individually detected $Herschel$ sources to the cosmic infrared background (CIRB) by a factor 5 close to its peak at 250$\mu$m and more than 3 in the 350$\mu$m and 500$\mu$m bands. We produce realistic mock $Herschel$ images of the deep PACS and SPIRE images of the GOODS-North field from the GOODS-$Herschel$ Key Program and use them to quantify the confusion noise at the position of individual sources, i.e., estimate a "local confusion noise". Two methods are used to identify sources with reliable photometric accuracy extracted using 24$\mu$m prior positions. The clean index (CI), previously defined but validated here with simulations, which measures the presence of bright 24$\mu$m neighbours and the photometric accuracy index (PAI) directly extracted from the mock $Herschel$ images. After correction for completeness, thanks to our mock $Herschel$ images, individually detected sources make up as much as 54% and 60% of the CIRB in the PACS bands down to 1.1 mJy at 100$\mu$m and 2.2 mJy at 160$\mu$m and 55, 33, and 13% of the CIRB in the SPIRE bands down to 2.5, 5, and 9 mJy at 250$\mu$m, 350$\mu$m, and 500$\mu$m, respectively. The latter depths improve the detection limits of $Herschel$ by factors of 5 at 250$\mu$m, and 3 at 350$\mu$m and 500$\mu$m as compared to the standard confusion limit. Interestingly, the dominant contributors to the CIRB in all $Herschel$ bands appear to be distant siblings of the Milky Way ($z$$\sim$0.96 for $\lambda$$<$300$\mu$m) with a stellar mass of $M_{\star}$$\sim$9$\times$10$^{10}$M$_{\odot}$.
  • We combine molecular gas masses inferred from CO emission in 500 star forming galaxies (SFGs) between z=0 and 3, from the IRAM-COLDGASS, PHIBSS1/2 and other surveys, with gas masses derived from Herschel far-IR dust measurements in 512 galaxy stacks over the same stellar mass/redshift range. We constrain the scaling relations of molecular gas depletion time scale (tdepl) and gas to stellar mass ratio (Mmolgas/M*) of SFGs near the star formation main-sequence with redshift, specific star formation rate (sSFR) and stellar mass (M*). The CO- and dust-based scaling relations agree remarkably well. This suggests that the CO-H2 mass conversion factor varies little within 0.6dex of the main sequence (sSFR(ms,z,M*)), and less than 0.3dex throughout this redshift range. This study builds on and strengthens the results of earlier work. We find that tdepl scales as (1+z)^-0.3 *(sSFR/sSFR(ms,z,M*))^-0.5, with little dependence on M*. The resulting steep redshift dependence of Mmolgas/M* ~(1+z)^3 mirrors that of the sSFR and probably reflects the gas supply rate. The decreasing gas fractions at high M* are driven by the flattening of the SFR-M* relation. Throughout the redshift range probed a larger sSFR at constant M* is due to a combination of an increasing gas fraction and a decreasing depletion time scale. As a result galaxy integrated samples of the Mmolgas-SFR rate relation exhibit a super-linear slope, which increases with the range of sSFR. With these new relations it is now possible to determine Mmolgas with an accuracy of 0.1dex in relative terms, and 0.2dex including systematic uncertainties.
  • Star-forming galaxies (SFGs) display a continuous distribution of specific star formation rates (sSFR) which can be approximated by the superposition of two log-normal distributions. The 1st of these encompasses the main sequence (MS) of SFGs, the 2nd one a rarer population of starbursts (SB). We show that the sSFR-distribution of SBs can be regarded as the result of a physical process (plausibly merging) taking the mathematical form of a log-normal boosting kernel and enhancing star formation activity. We explore the utility of splitting the star-forming population into MS and SB galaxies - an approach we term "2-Star Formation Mode" (2-SFM) framework - for understanding their molecular gas properties. Variations of star formation efficiency (SFE) and gas fractions among SFGs take a simple, redshift-independent form, once these quantities are normalized to the value of an average MS galaxy. The change in SFE for galaxies undergoing a starburst event scales supra-linearly with the SFR-increase, as expected for mergers. This implies a continuous distribution of galaxies in the Schmidt-Kennicutt plane that separates more clearly into loci for SBs and normal galaxies than observed in SFR vs. M* space. SBs with the largest deviations (>10-fold) from the MS, like many local ULIRGs, are not average SBs, but even rarer events with progenitors having larger gas fractions than typical MS galaxies. We statistically infer that the gas fractions of typical SBs decrease by a factor of 2 to 3 with respect to their direct MS progenitors, as expected to occur in short-term SFR-boosts during which internal gas reservoirs are drained more quickly than gas is accreted from the cosmic web. We predict variations of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor in the SFR-M* plane and provide evidence that the higher sSFR of distant galaxies is a direct consequence of larger gas fraction in these systems.
  • The processes that trigger Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) remain poorly understood. While lower luminosity AGN may be triggered by minor disturbances to the host galaxy, stronger disturbances are likely required to trigger luminous AGN. Major wet mergers of galaxies are ideal environments for AGN triggering since they provide large gas supplies and galaxy scale torques. There is however little observational evidence for a strong connection between AGN and major mergers. We analyse the morphological properties of AGN host galaxies as a function of AGN and host galaxy luminosity and compare them to a carefully matched sample of control galaxies. AGN are X-ray selected in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 0.8 and have luminosities 41 < log(L_X [erg/s]) < 44.5. 'Fake AGN' are simulated in the control galaxies by adding point sources with the magnitude of the matched AGN. We find that AGN host and control galaxies have comparable assymetries, Sersic indices and ellipticities at restframe ~950nm. AGN host galaxies show neither higher average asymmetries nor higher fractions of very disturbed objects. There is no increase in the prevalence of merger signatures with AGN luminosity. At 95% confidence we find that major mergers are responsible for <6% of all AGN in our sample as well as <40% of the highest luminosity AGN log(L_X [erg/s]) ~ 43.5). Major mergers therefore either play only a very minor role in the triggering of AGN in the luminosity range studied or time delays are too long for merger features to remain visible.
  • We present here a new spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting approach that we adopt to select radio-excess sources amongst distant star-forming galaxies in the GOODS-Herschel (North) field and to reveal the presence of hidden, highly obscured AGN. Through extensive SED analysis of 458 galaxies with radio 1.4 GHz and mid-IR 24 um detections using some of the deepest Chandra X-ray, Spitzer and Herschel infrared, and VLA radio data available to date, we have robustly identified a sample of 51 radio-excess AGN (~1300 deg^-2) out to redshift z~3. These radio-excess AGN have a significantly lower far-IR/radio ratio (q<1.68) than the typical relation observed for star-forming galaxies (q~2.2). We find that ~45% of these radio-excess sources have a dominant AGN component in the mid-IR band, while for the remainders the excess radio emission is the only indicator of AGN activity. The fraction of radio-excess AGN increases with X-ray luminosity reaching ~60% at Lx~10^44-10^45 erg/s, making these sources an important part of the total AGN population. However, almost half (24/51) of these radio-excess AGN are not detected in the deep Chandra X-ray data, suggesting that some of these sources might be heavily obscured. We also find that the specific star formation rates (sSFRs) of the radio-excess AGN are on average lower that those observed for X-ray selected AGN hosts, indicating that our sources are forming stars more slowly than typical AGN hosts, and possibly their star formation is progressively quenching.
  • Using X-ray stacking analyses we estimate the average amounts of supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth taking place in star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z~1 and z~2 as a function of galaxy stellar mass (M*). We find the average SMBH growth rate follows remarkably similar trends with M* and redshift as the average star-formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies (i.e., (i.e., dM_BH/dt ~ M*^(0.86+/-0.39) for the z~1 sample and dM_BH/dt ~ M*^(1.05+/-0.36) for the z~2 sample). It follows that the ratio of SMBH growth rate to SFR is (a) flat with respect to M* (b) not evolving with redshift and (c) close to the ratio required to maintain/establish a SMBH to M* ratio of ~10^{-3} as also inferred from today's M_BH-M_bulge relationship. We interpret this as evidence that SMBHs have, on average, grown in-step with their host galaxies since at least z~2, irrespective of host galaxy mass and AGN triggering mechanism. As such, we suggest that the same secular processes that drive the bulk of star formation are also responsible for the majority of SMBH growth. From this, we speculate that it is the availability of gas reservoirs that regulate both cosmological SMBH growth and star formation.
  • We present the Arizona CDFS Environment Survey (ACES), a recently-completed spectroscopic redshift survey of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) conducted using IMACS on the Magellan-Baade telescope. In total, the survey targeted 7277 unique sources down to a limiting magnitude of R = 24.1, yielding 5080 secure redshifts across the ~30' x 30' extended CDFS region. The ACES dataset delivers a significant increase to both the spatial coverage and the sampling density of the spectroscopic observations in the field. Combined with previously-published, spectroscopic redshifts, ACES now creates a highly-complete survey of the galaxy population at R < 23, enabling the local galaxy density (or environment) on relatively small scales (~1 Mpc) to be measured at z < 1 in one of the most heavily-studied and data-rich fields in the sky. Here, we describe the motivation, design, and implementation of the survey and present a preliminary redshift and environment catalog. In addition, we utilize the ACES spectroscopic redshift catalog to assess the quality of photometric redshifts from both the COMBO-17 and MUSYC imaging surveys of the CDFS.
  • We present a study of the infrared properties of X-ray selected, moderate luminosity (Lx=10^{42}-10^{44}ergs/s) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) up to z~3, to explore the links between star formation in galaxies and accretion onto their central black holes. We use 100um and 160um fluxes from GOODS-Herschel -the deepest survey yet undertaken by the Herschel telescope- and show that in >94 per cent of cases these fluxes are dominated by the host. We find no evidence of any correlation between the X-ray and infrared luminosities of moderate AGNs at any redshift, suggesting that star-formation is decoupled from nuclear (AGN) activity. The star formation rates of AGN hosts increase strongly with redshift; by a factor of 43 from z<0.1 to z=2-3 for AGNs with the same X-ray luminosities. This increase is consistent with the factor of 25-50 increase in the specific star formation rates (SSFRs) of normal, star-forming (main-sequence) galaxies. Indeed, the average SSFRs of AGN hosts are only marginally (20 per cent) lower than those of main-sequence galaxies, with this small deficit being due to a fraction of AGNs residing in quiescent (low-SSFR) galaxies. We estimate 79+/-10 per cent of moderate AGNs are hosted in main-sequence galaxies, 15+/-7 per cent in quiescent galaxies and <10 per cent in strongly starbursting galaxies. The fractions of all main sequence galaxies at z<2 experiencing a period of moderate nuclear activity is strongly dependent on galaxy stellar mass (Mstars); rising from a few per cent at Mstars~10^{10}Msun to >20 per cent at Mstars>10^{11}Msun. Our results indicate that it is galaxy stellar mass that is most important in dictating whether a galaxy hosts a moderate luminosity AGN. We argue that the majority of moderate nuclear activity is fuelled by internal mechanisms rather than violent mergers, suggesting that disk instabilities could be an important AGN feeding mechanism.
  • We present a detailed analysis of the relation between infrared luminosity and molecular line luminosity, for a variety of molecular transitions, using a sample of 34 nearby galaxies spanning a broad range of infrared luminosities (10^{10} < L_{IR} < 10^{12.5} L_sun). We show that the power-law index of the relation is sensitive to the critical density of the molecular gas tracer used, and that the dominant driver in observed molecular line ratios in galaxies is the gas density. As most nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) exhibit strong signatures of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in their center, we revisit previous claims questioning the reliability of HCN as a probe of the dense gas responsible for star formation in the presence of AGN. We find that the enhanced HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) luminosity ratio observed in ULIRGs can be successfully reproduced using numerical models with fixed chemical abundances and without AGN-induced chemistry effects. We extend this analysis to a total of ten molecular line ratios by combining the following transitions: CO(1-0), HCO+(1-0), HCO+(3-2), HCN(1-0), and HCN(3-2). Our results suggest that AGNs reside in systems with higher dense gas fraction, and that chemistry or other effects associated with their hard radiation field may not dominate (NGC 1068 is one exception). Galaxy merger could be the underlying cause of increased dense gas fraction and the evolutionary stage of such mergers may be another determinant of the HCN/CO luminosity ratio.
  • A broad continuum excess in the near-infrared, peaking in the rest-frame at 2-5 micron, is detected in a spectroscopic sample of 88 galaxies at 0.5<z<2.0 taken from the Gemini Deep Deep Survey. Line emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 3.3 micron alone cannot explain the excess, which can be fit by a spectral component consisting of a template of PAH emission lines superposed on a modified blackbody of temperature T~850 K. The luminosity of this near-infrared excess emission at 3 micron is found to be correlated with the star formation rate of the galaxy. The origin of the near-infrared excess is explored by examining similar excesses observed locally in massive star forming regions, reflection and planetary nebulae, post-asymptotic giant branch stars and in the galactic cirrus. We also consider the potential contribution from dust heated around low-luminosity active galactic nuclei. We conclude that the most likely explanation for the 2-5 micron excess is the contribution from circumstellar disks around massive young stellar objects seen in the integrated light of high-redshift galaxies. Assuming circumstellar disks extend down to lower masses, as they do in our own Galaxy, the excess emission presents us with an exciting opportunity to measure the formation rate of planetary systems at cosmic epochs before our own solar system formed.
  • We present observations made with the 10m Heinrich Hertz Sub-Millimeter Telescope of HCN (3-2) emission from a sample of 30 nearby galaxies ranging in infrared luminosity from 10^10 - 10^12.5 L_sun and HCN (3-2) luminosity from 10^6 - 10^9 K km s^-1 pc^2. We examine the correlation between the infrared luminosity and HCN (3-2) luminosity and find that the best fit linear regression has a slope (in log-log space) of 0.74+/-0.12. Including recently published data from Gracia-Carpio et al. tightens the constraints on the best-fit slope to 0.79+/-0.09. This slope below unity suggests that the HCN (3-2) molecular line luminosity is not linearly tracing the amount of dense gas. Our results are consistent with predictions from recent theoretical models that find slopes below unity when the line luminosity depends upon the average gas density with a power-law index greater than a Kennicutt-Schmidt index of 1.5.
  • The ISM metallicity and the stellar mass are examined in a sample of 66 galaxies at 0.4<z<1, selected from the Gemini Deep Deep Survey (GDDS) and the Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS). We observe a mass-metallicity relation similar to that seen in z~0.1 SDSS galaxies, but displaced towards higher masses and/or lower metallicities. Using this sample, and a small sample of z~2.3 LBGs, a redshift dependent mass-metallicity relation is proposed which describes the observed results.
  • We examine the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) and its dependence on galaxy stellar mass over the redshift range 0.8 < z < 2 using data from the Gemini Deep Deep Survey (GDDS). The SFR in the most massive galaxies (M > 10^{10.8} M_sun) was six times higher at z = 2 than it is today. It drops steeply from z = 2, reaching the present day value at z ~ 1. In contrast, the SFR density of intermediate mass galaxies (10^{10.2} < M < 10^{10.8} M_sun) declines more slowly and may peak or plateau at z ~ 1.5. We use the characteristic growth time t_SFR = rho_M / rho_SFR to provide evidence of an associated transition in massive galaxies from a burst to a quiescent star formation mode at z ~ 2. Intermediate mass systems transit from burst to quiescent mode at z ~ 1, while the lowest mass objects undergo bursts throughout our redshift range. Our results show unambiguously that the formation era for galaxies was extended and proceeded from high to low mass systems. The most massive galaxies formed most of their stars in the first ~3 Gyr of cosmic history. Intermediate mass objects continued to form their dominant stellar mass for an additional ~2 Gyr, while the lowest mass systems have been forming over the whole cosmic epoch spanned by the GDDS. This view of galaxy formation clearly supports `downsizing' in the SFR where the most massive galaxies form first and galaxy formation proceeds from larger to smaller mass scales.