• The evolution of the B-band galaxy luminosity function is measured using a sample of more than 11,000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey. The rest-frame M_B versus U-B color-magnitude diagram of DEEP2 galaxies shows that the color-magnitude bi-modality seen in galaxies locally is still present at redshifts z > 1. Dividing the sample at the trough of this color bimodality into predominantly red and blue galaxies, we find that the luminosity function of each galaxy color type evolves differently. Blue counts tend to shift to brighter magnitudes at constant number density, while the red counts remain largely constant at a fixed absolute magnitude. Using Schechter functions with fixed faint-end slopes we find that M*_B for blue galaxies brightens by ~ 1.3 magnitudes per unit redshift, with no significant evolution in number density. For red galaxies M*_B brightens somewhat less with redshift, while the formal value of phi* declines. When the population of blue galaxies is subdivided into two halves using the rest-frame color as the criterion, the measured evolution of both blue subpopulations is very similar.
  • The DEEP2 and COMBO-17 surveys are used to study the evolution of the luminosity function of red and blue galaxies to $z \sim 1$. Schechter function fits show that, since $z = 1$, $M^*_B$ dims by $\sim$ 1.3 mag per unit redshift for both color classes, $\phi^*$ of blue galaxies shows little change, while $\phi^*$ for red galaxies has formally nearly quadrupled. At face value, the number density of blue galaxies has remained roughly constant since $ z = 1$, whereas that of red galaxies has been rising. Luminosity densities support both conclusions, but we note that most red-galaxy evolution occurs between our data and local surveys and in our highest redshift bin, where the data are weakest. We discuss the implications of having most red galaxies emerge after $z = 1$ from precursors among the blue population, taking into account the properties of local and distant E/S0s. We suggest a ``mixed'' scenario in which some blue galaxies have their star-formation quenched in gas-rich mergers, migrate to the red sequence with a variety of masses, and merge further on the red sequence in one or more purely stellar mergers. E/S0s of a given mass today will have formed via different routes, in a manner that may help to explain the fundamental plane and other local scaling laws.
  • The optical light curve of the energetic gamma-ray burst GRB 991216 is consistent with jet-like behavior in which a power-law decay steepens from t**(-1.22 +/- 0.04) at early times to t**(-1.53 +/- 0.05) in a gradual transition at around 2 d. The derivation of the late-time decay slope takes into account the constant contribution of a host or intervening galaxy which was measured 110 d after the event at R = 24.56 +/- 0.14, although the light curve deviates from a single power law whether or not a constant term is included. The early-time spectral energy distribution of the afterglow can be described as F_nu ~ nu**(-0.74 +/- 0.05) or flatter between optical and X-ray, which, together with the slow initial decay, is characteristic of standard adiabatic evolution in a uniformly dense medium. Assuming that a reported absorption-line redshift of 1.02 is correct, the apparent isotropic energy of 6.7 x 10**53 erg is reduced by a factor of ~ 200 in the jet model, and the initial half-opening angle is ~ 6 deg. GRB 991216 is the third good example of a jet-like afterglow (following GRB 990123 and GRB 990510), supporting a trend in which the apparently most energetic gamma-ray events have the narrowest collimation and a uniform ISM environment. This, plus the absence of evidence for supernovae associated with jet-like afterglows, suggests that these events may originate from a progenitor in which angular momentum plays an important role but a massive stellar envelope or wind does not, e.g., the coalescence of a compact binary.