• Space-based photometric measurements first revealed low-amplitude irregularities in the pulsations of Cepheid stars, but their origins and how commonly they occur remain uncertain. To investigate this phenomenon, we present MOST space telescope photometry of two Cepheids. V473 Lyrae is a second-overtone, strongly modulated Cepheid, while U Trianguli Australis is a Cepheid pulsating simultaneously in the fundamental mode and first overtone. The nearly continuous, high-precision photometry reveals alternations in the amplitudes of cycles in V473 Lyr, the first case of period doubling detected in a classical Cepheid. In U TrA, we tentatively identify one peak as the $f_X$ or 0.61-type mode often seen in conjunction with the first radial overtone in Cepheids, but given the short length of the data, we cannot rule out that it is a combination peak instead. Ground-based photometry and spectroscopy were obtained to follow two modulation cycles in V473 Lyr and to better specify its physical parameters. The simultaneous data yield the phase lag parameter (the phase difference between maxima in luminosity and radial velocity) of a second-overtone Cepheid for the first time. We find no evidence for a period change in U TrA or an energy exchange between the fundamental mode and the first overtone during the last 50 years, contrary to earlier indications. Period doubling in V473 Lyr provides a strong argument that mode interactions do occur in some Cepheids and we may hypothesise that it could be behind the amplitude modulation, as recently proposed for Blazhko RR Lyrae stars.
  • The BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE) Constellation is the first nanosatellite mission applied to astrophysical research. Five satellites in low-Earth orbits perform precise optical two-colour photometry of the brightest stars in the night sky. BRITE is naturally well suited for variability studies of hot stars. This contribution describes the basic outline of the mission and some initial problems that needed to be overcome. Some information on BRITE data products, how to access them, and how to join their scientific exploration is provided. Finally, a brief summary of the first scientific results obtained by BRITE is given.
  • We report a simultaneous ground and space-based photometric study of the Beta Cephei star Nu Eridani. Half a year of observations have been obtained by four of the five satellites constituting BRITE-Constellation, supplemented with ground-based photoelectric photometry. We show that carefully combining the two data sets virtually eliminates the aliasing problem that often hampers time-series analyses. We detect 40 periodic signals intrinsic to the star in the light curves. Despite a lower detection limit we do not recover all the pressure and mixed modes previously reported in the literature, but we newly detect six additional gravity modes. This behaviour is a consequence of temporal changes in the pulsation amplitudes that we also detected for some of the p modes. We point out that the dependence of theoretically predicted pulsation amplitude on wavelength is steeper in visual passbands than those observationally measured, to the extent that the three dominant pulsation modes of Nu Eridani would be incorrectly identified using data in optical filters only. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy.
  • BRITE (BRIght Target Explorer) Constellation, the first nanosatellite mission applied to astrophysical research, is a collaboration among Austria, Canada and Poland. The fleet of satellites (6 launched, 5 functioning) performs precise optical photometry of the brightest stars in the night sky. A pioneering mission like BRITE - with optics and instruments restricted to small volume, mass and power in several nanosatellites, whose measurements must be coordinated in orbit - poses many unique challenges. We discuss the technical issues, including problems encountered during on-orbit commissioning (especially higher-than expected sensitivity of the CCDs to particle radiation). We describe in detail how the BRITE team has mitigated these problems, and provide a complete overview of mission operations. This paper serves as a template for how to effectively plan, build and operate future low-cost niche-driven space astronomy missions.
  • This paper aims to precisely determine the masses and detect pulsation modes in the two massive components of Beta Cen with BRITE-Constellation photometry. In addition, seismic models for the components are considered and the effects of fast rotation are discussed. This is done to test the limitations of seismic modeling for this very difficult case. A simultaneous fit of visual and spectroscopic orbits is used to self-consistently derive the orbital parameters, and subsequently the masses, of the components. The derived masses are equal to 12.02 +/- 0.13 and 10.58 +/- 0.18 M_Sun. The parameters of the wider, A - B system, presently approaching periastron passage, are constrained. Analysis of the combined blue- and red-filter BRITE-Constellation photometric data of the system revealed the presence of 19 periodic terms, of which eight are likely g modes, nine are p modes, and the remaining two are combination terms. It cannot be excluded that one or two low-frequency terms are rotational frequencies. It is possible that both components of Beta Cen are Beta Cep/SPB hybrids. An attempt to use the apparent changes of frequency to distinguish which modes originate in which component did not succeed, but there is potential for using this method when more BRITE data become available. Agena seems to be one of very few rapidly rotating massive objects with rich p- and g-mode spectra, and precisely known masses. It can therefore be used to gain a better understanding of the excitation of pulsations in relatively rapidly rotating stars and their seismic modeling. Finally, this case illustrates the potential of BRITE-Constellation data for the detection of rich-frequency spectra of small-amplitude modes in massive pulsating stars.
  • Binary stars provide a valuable test of stellar structure and evolution, because the masses of the individual stellar components can be derived with high accuracy and in a model-independent way. In this work, we study Spica, an eccentric double-lined spectroscopic binary system with a beta Cep type variable primary component. We use state-of-the-art modelling tools to determine accurate orbital elements of the binary system and atmospheric parameters of both stellar components. We interpret the short-period variability intrinsic to the primary component, detected on top of the orbital motion both in the photometric and spectroscopic data. The non-LTE based spectrum analysis reveals two stars of similar atmospheric chemical composition consistent with the present day cosmic abundance standard defined by Nieva&Przybilla (2012). The masses and radii of the stars are found to be 11.43+/-1.15 M_sun and 7.21+/-0.75 M_sun, and 7.47+/-0.54 R_sun and 3.74+/-0.53 R_sun for the primary and secondary, respectively. We find the primary component to pulsate in three independent modes, of which one is identified as a radial mode, while the two others are found to be non-radial, low degree l modes. The frequency of one of these modes is an exact multiple of the orbital frequency, and the l=m=2 mode identification suggests a tidal nature for this particular mode. We find a very good agreement between the derived dynamical and evolutionary masses for the Spica system to within the observational errors of the measured masses. The age of the system is estimated to be 12.5+/-1 Myr.
  • We report on an analysis of high-precision, multi-colour photometric observations of the rapidly-oscillating Ap (roAp) star $\alpha$ Cir. These observations were obtained with the BRITE-Constellation, which is a coordinated mission of five nanosatellites that collects continuous millimagnitude-precision photometry of dozens of bright stars for up to 180 days at a time in two colours (Johnson B and R). BRITE stands for BRight Target Explorer. The object $\alpha$ Cir is the brightest roAp star and an ideal target for such investigations, facilitating the determination of oscillation frequencies with high resolution. This star is bright enough for complementary interferometry and time-resolved spectroscopy. Four BRITE satellites observed $\alpha$ Cir for 146 d or 33 rotational cycles. Phasing the photometry according to the 4.4790 d rotational period reveals qualitatively different light variations in the two photometric bands. The phased red-band photometry is in good agreement with previously-published WIRE data, showing a light curve symmetric about phase 0.5 with a strong contribution from the first harmonic. The phased blue-band data, in contrast, show an essentially sinusoidal variation. We model both light curves with Bayesian Photometric Imaging, which suggests the presence of two large-scale, photometrically bright (relative to the surrounding photosphere) spots. We also examine the high-frequency pulsation spectrum as encoded in the BRITE photometry. Our analysis establishes the stability of the main pulsation frequency over the last 20 years, confirms the presence of frequency f7, which was not detected (or the mode not excited) prior to 2006, and excludes quadrupolar modes for the main pulsation frequency.
  • The quantity and quality of satellite photometric data strings is revealing details in Cepheid variation at very low levels. Specifically, we observed a Cepheid pulsating in the fundamental mode and one pulsating in the first overtone with the Canadian MOST satellite. The 3.7-d period fundamental mode pulsator (RT Aur) has a light curve that repeats precisely, and can be modeled by a Fourier series very accurately. The overtone pulsator (SZ Tau, 3.1 d period) on the other hand shows light curve variation from cycle to cycle which we characterize by the variations in the Fourier parameters. We present arguments that we are seeing instability in the pulsation cycle of the overtone pulsator, and that this is also a characteristic of the O-C curves of overtone pulsators. On the other hand, deviations from cycle to cycle as a function of pulsation phase follow a similar pattern in both stars, increasing after minimum radius. In summary, pulsation in the overtone pulsator is less stable than that of the fundamental mode pulsator at both long and short timescales.
  • We demonstrate that a seismic analysis of stars in their earliest evolutionary phases is a powerful method to identify young stars and distinguish their evolutionary states. The early star that is born from the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud reaches at some point sufficient temperature, mass and luminosity to be detected. Accretion stops and the pre-main sequence star that emerges is nearly fully convective and chemically homogeneous. It will continue to contract gravitationally until the density and temperature in the core are high enough to start nuclear burning of hydrogen. We show that there is a relationship between detected pulsation properties for a sample of young stars and their evolutionary status illustrating the potential of asteroseismology for the early evolutionary phases.
  • Context: The central star of the HR 8799 system is a gamma Doradus-type pulsator. The system harbours four planetary-mass companions detected by direct imaging, and is a good solar system analogue. The masses of the companions are not known accurately, because the estimation depends strongly on the age of the system, which is also not known with sufficient accuracy. Asteroseismic studies of the star might help to better constrain the age of HR 8799. We organized an extensive photometric and multi-site spectroscopic observing campaign for studying the pulsations of the central star. Aims: The aim of the present study is to investigate the pulsation properties of HR 8799 in detail via the ultra-precise 47-d-long nearly continuous photometry obtained with the MOST space telescope, and to find as many independent pulsation modes as possible, which is the prerequisite of an asteroseismic age determination. Methods: We carried out Fourier analysis of the wide-band photometric time series. Results: We find that resonance and sudden amplitude changes characterize the pulsation of HR 8799. The dominant frequency is always at f1 = 1.978 c/d. Many multiples of one ninth of the dominant frequency appear in the Fourier spectrum of the MOST data: n/9 f1, where n={1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 17, 18}. Our analysis also reveals that many of these peaks show strong amplitude decrease and phase variations even on the 47-d time-scale. The dependencies between the pulsation frequencies of HR 8799 make the planned subsequent asteroseismic analysis rather difficult. We point out some resemblance between the light curve of HR 8799 and the modulated pulsation light curves of Blazhko RR Lyrae stars.
  • BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V = 4. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats are UNIBRITE, designed and built by University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies - Space Flight Laboratory and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency under contract to the Canadian Space Agency into a low-Earth dusk-dawn polar orbit.
  • We present results from three weeks' photometric monitoring of the magnetic helium-strong star sigma Ori E using the MOST microsatellite. The star's light curve is dominated by twice-per-rotation eclipse-like dimmings arising when magnetospheric clouds transit across and occult the stellar disk. However, no evidence is found for any abrupt centrifugal breakout of plasma from the magnetosphere, either in the residual flux or in the depths of the light minima. Motivated by this finding we compare the observationally inferred magnetospheric mass against that predicted by a breakout analysis. The large discrepancy between the values leads us to argue that centrifugal breakout does not play a significant role in establishing the magnetospheric mass budget of sigma Ori E.
  • We concentrate on an asteroseismological study of HD 261711, a rather hot delta Scuti type pulsating member of the young open cluster NGC 2264 located at the blue border of the instability region. HD 261711 was discovered to be a pre-main sequence delta Scuti star using the time series photometry obtained by the MOST satellite in 2006. High-precision, time-series photometry of HD 261711 was obtained by the MOST and CoRoT satellites in 4 separate new observing runs that are put into context with the star's fundamental atmospheric parameters obtained from spectroscopy. With the new MOST data set from 2011/12 and the two CoRoT light curves from 2008 and 2011/12, the delta Scuti variability was confirmed and regular groups of frequencies were discovered. The two pulsation frequencies identified in the data from the first MOST observing run in 2006 are confirmed and 23 new delta Scuti-type frequencies were discovered using the CoRoT data. Weighted average frequencies for each group are related to l=0 and l=1 p-modes. Evidence for amplitude modulation of the frequencies in two groups is seen. The effective temperature was derived to be 8600$\pm$200 K, log g is 4.1$\pm$0.2, and the projected rotational velocity is 53$\pm$1km/s. Using our Teff value and the radius of 1.8$\pm$0.5 Rsun derived from SED fitting, we get a log L/Lsun of 1.20$\pm$0.14 which agrees well to the seismologically determined values of 1.65 Rsun and, hence, a log L/Lsun of 1.13. The radial velocity of 14$\pm$2 km/s we derived for HD 261711, confirms the star's membership to NGC 2264. Our asteroseismic models suggest that HD 261711 is a delta Scuti-type star close to the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) with a mass of 1.8 to 1.9Msun. HD 261711 is either a young ZAMS star or a late PMS star just before the onset of hydrogen-core burning.
  • We use photometric and spectroscopic observations of the eclipsing binaries V65, V66 and V69 in the field of the globular cluster M4 to derive masses, radii, and luminosities of their components. The orbital periods of these systems are 2.29, 8.11 and 48.19 d, respectively. The measured masses of the primary and secondary components (Mp and Ms) are 0.8035+-0.0086 and 0.6050+-0.0044 Msun for V65, 0.7842+-0.0045 and 0.7443+-0.0042 Msun for V66, and 0.7665+-0.0053 and 0.7278+-0.0048 Msun for V69. The measured radii (Rp and Rs) are 1.147+_0.010 and 0.6110+-0.0092 Rsun for V66, 0.9347+_0.0048 and 0.8298+-0.0053 Rsun for V66, and 0.8655+-0.0097 and 0.8074+-0.0080 Rsun for V69. The orbits of V65 and V66 are circular, whereas that of V69 has an eccentricity of 0.38. Based on systemic velocities and relative proper motions, we show that all the three systems are members of the cluster. We find that the distance to M4 is 1.82+-0.04 kpc - in good agreement with recent estimates based on entirely different methods. We compare the absolute parameters of V66 and V69 with two sets of theoretical isochrones in mass-radius and mass-luminosity diagrams, and for an assumed [Fe/H] = -1.20, [alpha/Fe] = 0.4, and Y = 0.25 we find the most probable age of M4 to be between 11.2 and 11.3 Gyr. CMD-fitting with the same parameters yields an age close to, or slightly in excess of, 12 Gyr. However, considering the sources of uncertainty involved in CMD fitting, these two methods of age determination are not discrepant. Age and distance determinations can be further improved when infrared eclipse photometry is obtained.
  • MOST observations and model analysis of the Herbig Ae star HD 34282 (V1366 Ori) reveal {\delta}-Scuti pulsations. 22 frequencies are observed, 10 of which confirm those previously identified by Amado et al. (2006), and 12 of which are newly discovered in this work. We show that the weighted-average frequency in each group fits the radial p-mode frequencies of viable models. We argue that the observed pulsation spectrum extends just to the edge to the acoustic cut-off frequency and show that this also is consistent with our best-fitting models.
  • The Praesepe cluster contains a number of Delta Sct and Gamma Dor pulsators. Asteroseismology of cluster stars is simplified by the common distance, age and stellar abundances. Since asteroseismology requires a large number of known frequencies, the small pulsation amplitudes of these stars require space satellite campaigns. The present study utilizes photometric MOST satellite measurements in order to determine the pulsation frequencies of two evolved (EP Cnc, BT Cnc) and two main-sequence (BS Cnc, HD 73872) Delta Sct stars in the Praesepe cluster. The frequency analysis of the 2008 and 2009 data detected up to 34 frequencies per star with most amplitudes in the submillimag range. In BS Cnc, two modes showed strong amplitude variability between 2008 and 2009. The frequencies ranged from 0.76 to 41.7 c/d. After considering the different evolutionary states and mean stellar densities of these four stars, the differences and large ranges in frequency remain.
  • We present high-precision time-series photometry of the classical delta Scuti star HD 144277 obtained with the MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of STars) satellite in two consecutive years. The observed regular frequency patterns are investigated asteroseismologically. HD 144277 is a hot A-type star that is located on the blue border of the classical instability strip. While we mostly observe low radial order modes in classical delta Scuti stars, HD 144277 presents a different case. Its high observed frequencies, i.e., between 59.9c/d (693.9 microHz) and 71.1c/d (822.8microHz), suggest higher radial orders. We examine the progression of the regular frequency spacings from the low radial order to the asymptotic frequency region. Frequency analysis was performed using Period04 and SigSpec. The results from the MOST observing runs in 2009 and 2010 were compared to each other. The resulting frequencies were submitted to asteroseismic analysis. HD 144277 was discovered to be a delta Scuti star using the time-series photometry observed by the MOST satellite. Twelve independent pulsation frequencies lying in four distinct groups were identified. Two additional frequencies were found to be combination frequencies. The typical spacing of 3.6c/d corresponds to the spacing between subsequent radial and dipole modes, therefore the spacing between radial modes is twice this value, 7.2c/d. Based on the assumption of slow rotation, we find evidence that the two radial modes are the sixth and seventh overtones, and the frequency with the highest amplitude can be identified as a dipole mode. The models required to fit the observed instability range need slightly less metallicity and a moderate enhancement of the helium abundance compared to the standard chemical composition. Our asteroseismic models suggest that HD 144277 is a delta Scuti star close to the ZAMS with a mass of 1.66 solar masses.
  • We present results of new photometry for the globular star cluster NGC 2155 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Our I- and V-band observations were obtained with the 6.5-meter Magellan 1 Baade Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory resulting in deep photometry down to V ~ 24 mag. By analyzing the color-magnitude diagram for the cluster and utilizing the Victoria-Regina grid of isochrones models we estimated the age of the cluster at ~ 2.25 Gyr and [Fe/H]=-0.71, the numbers which place NGC 2155 outside the age-gap in the age-metallicity relation for LMC clusters. Using the Difference Image Analysis Package (DIAPL), we detected 7 variable stars in the cluster field with variability at the level of 0.01 magnitude in the I-band. Three variables are particularly interesting: two SX Phoenicis (SX Phe) stars pulsating in the fundamental mode, and a detached eclipsing binary which is a prime candidate to estimate the distance to the cluster.
  • A 30-day contiguous photometric run with the MOST satellite on the WN5-6b star WR 110 (HD 165688) reveals a fundamental periodicity of P = 4.08 +/- 0.55 days along with a number of harmonics at periods P/n, with n ~ 2,3,4,5 and 6, and a few other possible stray periodicities and/or stochastic variability on timescales longer than about a day. Spectroscopic RV studies fail to reveal any plausible companion with a period in this range. Therefore, we conjecture that the observed light-curve cusps of amplitude ~ 0.01 mag that recur at a 4.08 day timescale may arise in the inner parts, or at the base of, a corotating interaction region (CIR) seen in emission as it rotates around with the star at constant angular velocity. The hard X-ray component seen in WR 110 could then be a result of a high velocity component of the CIR shock interacting with the ambient wind at several stellar radii. Given that most hot, luminous stars showing CIRs have two CIR arms, it is possible that either the fundamental period is 8.2 days or, more likely in the case of WR 110, there is indeed a second weaker CIR arm for P = 4.08 days, that occurs ~ two thirds of a rotation period after the main CIR. If this interpretation is correct, WR 110 therefore joins the ranks with three other single WR stars, all WN, with confirmed CIR rotation periods (WR 1, WR 6, and WR 134), albeit with WR 110 having by far the lowest amplitude photometric modulation. This illustrates the power of being able to secure intense, continuous high-precision photometry from space-based platforms such as MOST. It also opens the door to revealing low-amplitude photometric variations in other WN stars, where previous attempts have failed. If all WN stars have CIRs at some level, this could be important for revealing sources of magnetism or pulsation in addition to rotation periods.
  • The more massive counterparts of T Tauri stars, Herbig Ae/Be stars, are known to vary in a complex way with no variability mechanism clearly identified. We attempt to characterize the optical variability of HD~37806 (MWC 120) on time scales ranging between minutes and several years. A continuous, one-minute resolution, 21 day-long sequence of MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) satellite observations has been analyzed using wavelet, scalegram and dispersion analysis tools. The MOST data have been augmented by sparse observations over 9 seasons from ASAS (All Sky Automated Survey), by previously non-analyzed ESO (European Southern Observatory) data partly covering 3 seasons and by archival measurements dating back half a century ago. Mutually superimposed flares or accretion instabilities grow in size from about 0.0003 of the mean flux on a time scale of minutes to a peak-to-peak range of <~0.05 on a time scale of a few years. The resulting variability has properties of stochastic "red" noise, whose self-similar characteristics are very similar to those observed in cataclysmic binary stars, but with much longer characteristic time scales of hours to days (rather than minutes) and with amplitudes which appear to cease growing in size on time scales of tens of years. In addition to chaotic brightness variations combined with stochastic noise, the MOST data show a weakly defined cyclic signal with a period of about 1.5 days, which may correspond to the rotation of the star.
  • We present precise photometry of the pulsating Herbig Ae star HD 142666 obtained in two consecutive years with the MOST (Microvariability & Oscilations of STars) satellite. Previously, only a single pulsation period was known for HD 142666. The MOST photometry reveals that HD 142666 is multi-periodic. However, the unique identification of pulsation frequencies is complicated by the presence of irregular variability caused by the star's circumstellar dust disk. The two light curves obtained with MOST in 2006 and 2007 provided data of unprecedented quality to study the pulsations in HD 142666 and also to monitor the circumstellar variability. We attribute 12 frequencies to pulsation. Model fits to the three frequencies with the highest amplitudes lie well outside the uncertainty box for the star's position in the HR diagram based on published values. The models suggest that either (1) the published estimate of the luminosity of HD 142666, based on a relation between circumstellar disk radius and stellar luminosity, is too high and/or (2) additional physics such as mass accretion may be needed in our models to accurately fit both the observed frequencies and HD 142666's position in the HR diagram.
  • The G9.5 giant eps Oph shows evidence of radial p-mode pulsations in both radial velocity and luminosity. We re-examine the observed frequencies in the photometry and radial velocities and find a best model fit to 18 of the 21 most significant photometric frequencies. The observed frequencies are matched to both radial and nonradial modes in the best model fit. The small scatter of the frequencies about the model predicted frequencies indicate that the average lifetimes of the modes could be as long as 10-20d. The best fit model itself, constrained only by the observed frequencies, lies within 1 sigma of eps Oph's position in the HR-diagram and the interferometrically determined radius.
  • EE Cam is a previously little studied Delta Scuti pulsator with amplitudes between those of the HADS (High-Amplitude Delta Scuti stars) group and the average low-amplitude pulsators. Since the size of stellar rotation determines both which pulsation modes are selected by the star as well as their amplitudes, the star offers a great opportunity to examine the astrophysical connections. Extensive photometric measurements covering several months were carried out. 15 significant pulsation frequencies were extracted. The dominant mode at 4.934 cd$^{-1}$ was identified as a radial mode by examining the phase shifts at different wavelengths. Medium-dispersion spectra yielded a $v\sin i$ value of $40 \pm 3$ km s$^{-1}$. This shows that EE Cam belongs to the important transition region between the HADS and normal Delta Scuti stars.
  • The MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) satellite obtains ultraprecise photometry from space with high sampling rates and duty cycles. Astronomical photometry or imaging missions in low Earth orbits, like MOST, are especially sensitive to scattered light from Earthshine, and all these missions have a common need to extract target information from voluminous data cubes. They consist of upwards of hundreds of thousands of two-dimensional CCD frames (or sub-rasters) containing from hundreds to millions of pixels each, where the target information, superposed on background and instrumental effects, is contained only in a subset of pixels (Fabry Images, defocussed images, mini-spectra). We describe a novel reduction technique for such data cubes: resolving linear correlations of target and background pixel intensities. This stepwise multiple linear regression removes only those target variations which are also detected in the background. The advantage of regression analysis versus background subtraction is the appropriate scaling, taking into account that the amount of contamination may differ from pixel to pixel. The multivariate solution for all pairs of target/background pixels is minimally invasive of the raw photometry while being very effective in reducing contamination due to, e.g., stray light. The technique is tested and demonstrated with both simulated oscillation signals and real MOST photometry.
  • Eight consecutive low-frequency radial p-modes are identified in the G0 IV star eta Bootis based on 27 days of ultraprecise rapid photometry obtained by the MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of Stars) satellite. The MOST data extend smoothly to lower overtones the sequence of radial p-modes reported in earlier groundbased spectroscopy by other groups. The lower-overtone modes from the MOST data constrain the interior structure of the model of eta Boo. With the interior fit anchored by the lower-overtone modes seen by MOST, standard models are not able to fit the higher-overtone modes with the same level of accuracy. The discrepancy is similar to the discrepancy that exists between the Sun's observed p-mode frequencies and the p-mode frequencies of the standard solar model. This discrepancy promises to be a powerful constraint on models of 3D convection.