• Superclusters form from the largest enhancements in the primordial density perturbation field and extend for tens of Mpc, tracing the large-scale structure of the Universe. We characterise XLSSsCN01, a rich supercluster at z~0.3 detected in the XXL Survey, composed of X-ray clusters of different virial masses and luminosities. As one of the first studies on this topic, we investigate the stellar populations of galaxies in different environments in the supercluster region. We study a magnitude-limited (r<=20) and a mass-limited sample (log(M*/M_sun)>10.8) of galaxies in the virialised region and in the outskirts of 11 XLSSsCN01 clusters, in high- and low-density field. We compute the stellar population properties of galaxies using spectral energy distribution and spectral fitting techniques, and study the dependence of star formation rates (SFR), colours, and stellar ages on environment. For r<20, the fraction of SFing/blue galaxies, computed either from the specific-SFR (sSFR) or rest-frame(rf) colour, shows depletion within the cluster virial radii, where the number of galaxies with log(sSFR/yr^-1)>-12 and with (g-r)_rf<0.6 is lower than in the field. For log(M*/M_sun)>10.8, no trends with environment emerge, as massive galaxies are mostly already passive in all environments. No differences among low- and high-density field members and cluster members emerge in the sSFR-mass relation. The luminosity-weighted age-mass relation of the passive populations within cluster virial radii show signatures of recent environmental quenching. The study of luminous and massive galaxies in this supercluster shows that while environment has a prominent role in determining the fractions of SFing/blue galaxies, its effects on the star formation activity in SFing galaxies are negligible.
  • The XMM-XXL Survey spans two fields of $\rm 25$ deg$^2$ each observed for more than 6Ms with XMM, which provided a sample of tens of thousands of point sources with a flux limit of $\sim 2.2 \times 10^{-15}$ and $\sim 1.4 \times 10^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{2}$, corresponding to 50% of the area curve, in the soft band and hard band, respectively. In this paper we present the spatial clustering properties of $\sim 3100$ and $\sim 1900$ X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the 0.5-2 and 2-10 keV bands, respectively, which have been spectroscopically observed with the AAOmega facility. This sample is 90% redshift complete down to an optical magnitude limit of $r\lesssim 21.8$. The sources span the redshift interval $0<z<5.2$, although in the current analysis we limit our samples to $z\le 3$, with corresponding sample median values of $\bar{z}\simeq 0.96$ and 0.79 for the soft band and hard band, respectively. We employ the projected two-point correlation function to infer the spatial clustering and find a correlation length $r_0=7.0 (\pm 0.34)$ and 6.42$(\pm 0.42)$ $h^{-1}$ Mpc, respectively, for the soft- and hard-band detected sources with a slope for both cases of $\gamma=1.44 (\pm 0.1)$. The power-law clustering was detected within comoving separations of 1 and $\sim$25 $h^{-1}$ Mpc. These results, as well as those derived in two separate redshift ranges, provide bias factors of the corresponding AGN host dark matter halos that are consistent with a halo mass of $\log_{10} [M_h/(h^{-1} M_{\odot})]=13.04\pm 0.06$, confirming the results of most recent studies based on smaller X-ray AGN samples.
  • L. Amati, P. O'Brien, D. Goetz, E. Bozzo, C. Tenzer, F. Frontera, G. Ghirlanda, C. Labanti, J. P. Osborne, G. Stratta, N. Tanvir, R. Willingale, P. Attina, R. Campana, A.J. Castro-Tirado, C. Contini, F. Fuschino, A. Gomboc, R. Hudec, P. Orleanski, E. Renotte, T. Rodic, Z. Bagoly, A. Blain, P. Callanan, S. Covino, A. Ferrara, E. Le Floch, M. Marisaldi, S. Mereghetti, P. Rosati, A. Vacchi, P. D'Avanzo, P. Giommi, A. Gomboc, S. Piranomonte, L. Piro, V. Reglero, A. Rossi, A. Santangelo, R. Salvaterra, G. Tagliaferri, S. Vergani, S. Vinciguerra, M. Briggs, E. Campolongo, R. Ciolfi, V. Connaughton, B. Cordier, B. Morelli, M. Orlandini, C. Adami, A. Argan, J.-L. Atteia, N. Auricchio, L. Balazs, G. Baldazzi, S. Basa, R. Basak, P. Bellutti, M. G. Bernardini, G. Bertuccio, J. Braga, M. Branchesi, S. Brandt, E. Brocato, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, A. Bulgarelli, L. Burderi, J. Camp, S. Capozziello, J. Caruana, P. Casella, B. Cenko, P. Chardonnet, B. Ciardi, S. Colafrancesco, M. G. Dainotti, V. D'Elia, D. De Martino, M. De Pasquale, E. Del Monte, M. Della Valle, A. Drago, Y. Evangelista, M. Feroci, F. Finelli, M. Fiorini, J. Fynbo, A. Gal-Yam, B. Gendre, G. Ghisellini, A. Grado, C. Guidorzi, M. Hafizi, L. Hanlon, J. Hjorth, L. Izzo, L. Kiss, P. Kumar, I. Kuvvetli, M. Lavagna, T. Li, F. Longo, M. Lyutikov, U. Maio, E. Maiorano, P. Malcovati, D. Malesani, R. Margutti, A. Martin-Carrillo, N. Masetti, S. McBreen, R. Mignani, G. Morgante, C. Mundell, H. U. Nargaard-Nielsen, L. Nicastro, E. Palazzi, S. Paltani, F. Panessa, G. Pareschi, A. Pe'er, A. V. Penacchioni, E. Pian, E. Piedipalumbo, T. Piran, G. Rauw, M. Razzano, A. Read, L. Rezzolla, P. Romano, R. Ruffini, S. Savaglio, V. Sguera, P. Schady, W. Skidmore, L. Song, E. Stanway, R. Starling, M. Topinka, E. Troja, M. van Putten, E. Vanzella, S. Vercellone, C. Wilson-Hodge, D. Yonetoku, G. Zampa, N. Zampa, B. Zhang, B. B. Zhang, S. Zhang, S.-N. Zhang, A. Antonelli, F. Bianco, S. Boci, M. Boer, M. T. Botticella, O. Boulade, C. Butler, S. Campana, F. Capitanio, A. Celotti, Y. Chen, M. Colpi, A. Comastri, J.-G. Cuby, M. Dadina, A. De Luca, Y.-W. Dong, S. Ettori, P. Gandhi, E. Geza, J. Greiner, S. Guiriec, J. Harms, M. Hernanz, A. Hornstrup, I. Hutchinson, G. Israel, P. Jonker, Y. Kaneko, N. Kawai, K. Wiersema, S. Korpela, V. Lebrun, F. Lu, A. MacFadyen, G. Malaguti, L. Maraschi, A. Melandri, M. Modjaz, D. Morris, N. Omodei, A. Paizis, P. Pata, V. Petrosian, A. Rachevski, J. Rhoads, F. Ryde, L. Sabau-Graziati, N. Shigehiro, M. Sims, J. Soomin, D. Szecsi, Y. Urata, M. Uslenghi, L. Valenziano, G. Vianello, S. Vojtech, D. Watson, J. Zicha
    March 27, 2018 astro-ph.IM, astro-ph.HE
    THESEUS is a space mission concept aimed at exploiting Gamma-Ray Bursts for investigating the early Universe and at providing a substantial advancement of multi-messenger and time-domain astrophysics. These goals will be achieved through a unique combination of instruments allowing GRB and X-ray transient detection over a broad field of view (more than 1sr) with 0.5-1 arcmin localization, an energy band extending from several MeV down to 0.3 keV and high sensitivity to transient sources in the soft X-ray domain, as well as on-board prompt (few minutes) follow-up with a 0.7 m class IR telescope with both imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. THESEUS will be perfectly suited for addressing the main open issues in cosmology such as, e.g., star formation rate and metallicity evolution of the inter-stellar and intra-galactic medium up to redshift $\sim$10, signatures of Pop III stars, sources and physics of re-ionization, and the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In addition, it will provide unprecedented capability to monitor the X-ray variable sky, thus detecting, localizing, and identifying the electromagnetic counterparts to sources of gravitational radiation, which may be routinely detected in the late '20s / early '30s by next generation facilities like aLIGO/ aVirgo, eLISA, KAGRA, and Einstein Telescope. THESEUS will also provide powerful synergies with the next generation of multi-wavelength observatories (e.g., LSST, ELT, SKA, CTA, ATHENA).
  • We conducted a multi-wavelength six-month campaign to observe the Seyfert galaxy NGC~7469, using the space-based observatories \textit{HST}, \textit{Swift}, \textit{XMM-Newton} and \textit{NuSTAR}. Here we report the results of the spectral analysis of the 7 simultaneous \textit{XMM-Newton} and \textit{NuSTAR} observations. The sources shows significant flux variability within each observation, but the average flux is less variable among the different pointings of our campaign. Our spectral analysis reveals a prominent narrow neutral \ion{Fe} K$\alpha$ emission line in all the spectra, with weaker contributions from Fe K$\beta$, neutral Ni K$\alpha$ and ionised iron. We find no evidence for variability or relativistic effects acting on the emission lines, which indicates that they originate from distant material. Analysing jointly \textit{XMM-Newton} and \textit{NuSTAR} data a constant photon index is found ($\Gamma$=$1.78\pm0.02$), together with a high energy cut-off $E_{\rm{cut}}=170^{+60}_{-40}$ keV. Adopting a self-consistent Comptonization model, these values correspond to an average coronal electron temperature of kT=$45^{+15}_{-12}$ keV and, assuming a spherical geometry, an optical depth $\tau=2.6\pm0.9$. The reflection component is consistent with being constant, with a reflection fraction in the range $R=0.3-0.6$. A prominent soft excess dominates the spectra below 4 keV. This is best fit with a second Comptonization component, arising from a \virg{warm corona} with an average $kT=0.67\pm0.03$ keV and a corresponding optical depth $\tau=9.2\pm0.2$.
  • The fraction of galaxies bound in groups in the nearby Universe is high (50% at z~0). Systematic studies of galaxy properties in groups are important in order to improve our understanding of the evolution of galaxies and of the physical phenomena occurring within this environment. We have built a complete spectrophotometric sample of galaxies within X-ray detected, optically spectroscopically confirmed groups and clusters (G&C), covering a wide range of halo masses at z<= 0.6. In the context of the XXL survey, we analyse a sample of 164 G&C in the XXL-North region (XXL-N), at z <= 0.6, with a wide range of virial masses (1.24 x 10^13 <=M_500 M_sun <= 6.63 x 10^14) and X-ray luminosities ( 2.27 x 10^41 <= L^XXL_500 (erg/s)<= 2.15 x10^44). The G&C are X-ray selected and spectroscopically confirmed. We describe the membership assignment and the spectroscopic completeness analysis, and compute stellar masses. As a first scientific exploitation of the sample, we study the dependence of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) on global environment. We present a spectrophotometric characterisation of the G&C and their galaxies. The final sample contains 132 G&C, 22111 field galaxies and 2225 G&C galaxies with r-band magnitude <20. Of the G&C, 95% have at least three spectroscopic members, and 70% at least ten. The shape of the GSMF seems not to depend on environment (field versus G&C) or X-ray luminosity ( used as a proxy for the virial mass of the system). These results are confirmed by the study of the correlation between mean stellar mass of G&C members and L^XXL_500.We release the spectrophotometric catalogue of galaxies with all the quantities computed in this work. As a first homogeneous census of galaxies within X-ray spectroscopically confirmed G&C at these redshifts, this sample will allow environmental studies of the evolution of galaxy properties.
  • The Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0419-577 hosts a $\sim$kpc extended outflow that is evident in the [\ion{O}{iii}] image and that is also detected as a warm absorber in the UV/X-ray spectrum. Here, we analyze a $\sim$30 ks Chandra-ACIS X-ray image, with the aim of resolving the diffuse extranuclear X-ray emission and of investigating its relationship with the galactic outflow. Thanks to its sub-arcsecond spatial resolution, Chandra resolves the circumnuclear X-ray emission, which extends up to a projected distance of at least $\sim$16 kpc from the center. The morphology of the diffuse X-ray emission is spherically symmetrical. We could not recover a morphological resemblance between the soft X-ray emission and the ionization bicone that is traced by the [\ion{O}{iii}] outflow. we argue that the photoionized gas nebula must be distributed mostly along the polar directions, outside our line of sight. In this geometry, the X-ray/UV warm absorber must trace a different gas component, physically disconnected from the emitting gas, and located closer to the equatorial plane.
  • We investigate the ionic column density variability of the ionized outflows associated with NGC$\sim$7469, to estimate their location and power. This could allow a better understanding of galactic feedback of AGNs to their host galaxies. Analysis of seven XMM-Newton grating observations from 2015 is reported. We use an individual-ion spectral fitting approach, and compare different epochs to accurately determine variability on time-scales of years, months, and days. We find no significant column density variability in a 10 year period implying that the outflow is far from the ionizing source. The implied lower bound on the ionization equilibrium time, 10 years, constrains the lower limit on the distance to be at least 12 pc, and up to 31 pc, much less but consistent with the 1 kpc wide starburst ring. The ionization distribution of column density is reconstructed from measured column densities, nicely matching results of two 2004 observations, with one large high ionization parameter ($\xi$) component at $2<\log \xi<3.5$, and one at $0.5<\log \xi<1$ in cgs units. The strong dependence of the expression for kinetic power, $\propto1/\xi$, hampers tight constraints on the feedback mechanism of outflows with a large range in ionization parameter, which is often observed and indicates a non-conical outflow. The kinetic power of the outflow is estimated here to be within 0.4 and 60 \% of the Eddington luminosity, depending on the ion used to estimate $\xi$.
  • Modern cosmological simulations rely heavily on feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) in order to stave off overcooling in massive galaxies and galaxy groups and clusters. An important independent test is whether or not the simulations capture the broad demographics of the observed AGN population. Here, we have used the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to produce realistic synthetic catalogs of X-ray AGN out to $z$=3, with the aim of comparing the catalogs to the observed X-ray AGN population in the XXL survey and other recent surveys. We focused on the unabsorbed X-ray luminosity function (XLF), the Eddington ratio distribution, the black hole mass function, and the projected clustering of X-ray AGN. To compute the unabsorbed XLF of the simulated AGN, we used recent empirically-determined bolometric corrections. We show that the simulated AGN sample accurately reproduces the observed XLF over 3 orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity in all redshift bins. To compare to the observed Eddington ratio distribution and the clustering of AGN, we produced detailed 'XMM-Newton-detected' catalogs of the simulated AGN. This requires the production of synthetic X-ray images extracted from light cones of the simulations that fold in the relevant instrumental effects of XMM-Newton. We apply a luminosity- and redshift-dependent obscuration function for the AGN and employ the same AGN detection algorithm as used for the real XXL survey. We demonstrate that the detected population of simulated AGN reproduces the observed Eddington ratio distribution and projected clustering from XXL quite well. We conclude that the simulations have a broadly realistic population of AGN and that our synthetic X-ray AGN catalogs should be useful for interpreting additional trends and as a helpful tool for quantifying AGN contamination in galaxy group and cluster X-ray surveys.
  • In 2016 we carried out a Swift monitoring program to track the X-ray hardness variability of eight type-I AGN over a year. The purpose of this monitoring was to find intense obscuration events in AGN, and thereby study them by triggering joint XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and HST observations. We successfully accomplished this for NGC 3783 in December 2016. We found heavy X-ray absorption produced by an obscuring outflow in this AGN. As a result of this obscuration, interesting absorption features appear in the UV and X-ray spectra, which are not present in the previous epochs. Namely, the obscuration produces broad and blue-shifted UV absorption lines of Ly$\alpha$, C IV, and N V, together with a new high-ionisation component producing Fe XXV and Fe XXVI absorption lines. In soft X-rays, only narrow emission lines stand out above the diminished continuum as they are not absorbed by the obscurer. Our analysis shows that the obscurer partially covers the central source with a column density of few $10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, outflowing with a velocity of few thousand km s$^{-1}$. The obscuration in NGC 3783 is variable and lasts for about a month. Unlike the commonly-seen warm-absorber winds at pc-scale distances from the black hole, the eclipsing wind in NGC 3783 is located at about 10 light days. Our results suggest the obscuration is produced by an inhomogeneous and clumpy medium, consistent with clouds in the base of a radiatively-driven disk wind at the outer broad-line region of the AGN.
  • The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z<2) cluster, (z<4) AGN and cosmic background survey science will then benefit from an extraordinary data reservoir. This, combined with deep multi-$\lambda$ observations, will lead to solid standalone cosmological constraints and provide a wealth of information on the formation and evolution of AGN, clusters and the X-ray background. In particular, it will offer a unique opportunity to pinpoint the z>1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.
  • In the local Universe, the growth of massive galaxy clusters mainly operates through the continuous accretion of group-scale systems. The infalling group in Abell 2142 is the poster child of such an accreting group, and as such, it is an ideal target to study the astrophysical processes induced by structure formation. We present the results of a deep (200 ks) observation of this structure with Chandra, which highlights the complexity of this system in exquisite detail. In the core of the group, the spatial resolution of Chandra reveals the presence of a leading edge and a complex AGN-induced activity. The morphology of the stripped gas tail appears straight in the innermost 250 kpc, suggesting that magnetic draping efficiently shields the gas from its surroundings. However, beyond $\sim300$ kpc from the core, the tail flares and the morphology becomes strongly irregular, which could be explained by a breaking of the drape, e.g. because of turbulent motions. The power spectrum of surface-brightness fluctuations is relatively flat ($P_{2D}\propto k^{-2.3}$), which indicates that thermal conduction is strongly inhibited even beyond the region where magnetic draping is effective. The amplitude of density fluctuations in the tail is consistent with a mild level of turbulence with a Mach number $M_{3D}\sim0.1-0.25$. Overall, our results show that the processes leading to the thermalization and mixing of the infalling gas are slow and relatively inefficient.
  • Giant radio halos are Mpc-scale diffuse radio sources associated with the central regions of galaxy clusters. The most promising scenario to explain the origin of these sources is that of turbulent re-acceleration, in which MeV electrons injected throughout the formation history of galaxy clusters are accelerated to higher energies by turbulent motions mostly induced by cluster mergers. In this Letter, we use the amplitude of density fluctuations in the intracluster medium as a proxy for the turbulent velocity and apply this technique to a sample of 51 clusters with available radio data. Our results indicate a segregation in the turbulent velocity of radio halo and radio quiet clusters, with the turbulent velocity of the former being on average higher by about a factor of two. The velocity dispersion recovered with this technique correlates with the measured radio power through the relation $P_{\rm radio}\propto\sigma_v^{3.3\pm0.7}$, which implies that the radio power is nearly proportional to the turbulent energy rate. Our results provide an observational confirmation of a key prediction of the turbulent re-acceleration model and possibly shed light on the origin of radio halos.
  • Galaxy clusters are thought to grow hierarchically through the continuous merging and accretion of smaller structures across cosmic time. In the local Universe, these phenomena are still active in the outer regions of massive clusters ($R>R_{500}$), where the matter distribution is expected to become clumpy and asymmetric because of the presence of accreting structures. We present the XMM-Newton Cluster Outskirts Project (X-COP), which targets the outer regions of a sample of 13 massive clusters ($M_{500}>3\times10^{14}M_\odot$) in the redshift range 0.04-0.1 at uniform depth. The sample was selected based on the signal-to-noise ratio in the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) survey with the aim of combining high-quality X-ray and SZ constraints throughout the entire cluster volume. Our observing strategy allows us to reach a sensitivity of $3\times10^{-16}$ ergs cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ arcmin$^{-2}$ in the [0.5-2.0] keV range thanks to a good control of systematic uncertainties. The combination of depth and field of view achieved in X-COP will allow us to pursue the following main goals: i) measure the distribution of entropy and thermal energy to an unprecedented level of precision; ii) assess the presence of non-thermal pressure support in cluster outskirts; iii) study the occurrence and mass distribution of infalling gas clumps. We illustrate the capabilities of the program with a pilot study on the cluster Abell 2142.
  • Athena is the large mission selected by ESA in 2013 to investigate the science theme "Hot and Energetic Universe" and presently scheduled for launch in 2028. One of the two instruments located at the focus of the 12 m-long Athena telescope is the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU). This is an array of TES micro-calorimeters that will be operated at temperatures of 50 mK in order to perform high resolution spectroscopy with an energy resolution down to 2.5 eV at energies < 7 keV. In order to cope with the large dynamical range of X-ray fluxes spanned by the celestial objects Athena will be observing, the X-IFU will be equipped with a filter wheel. This will allow the user to fine tune the instrument set-up based on the nature of the target, thus optimizing the scientific outcomes of the observation. A few positions of the filter wheel will also be used to host a calibration source and to allow the measurement of the instrument intrinsic background.
  • Euclid is the second medium-size mission (M2) of the ESA Cosmic Vision Program, currently scheduled for a launch in 2020. The two instruments on-board Euclid, VIS and NISP, will provide key measurements to investigate the nature of dark energy, advancing our knowledge on cosmology. We present in this contribution the development and manufacturing status of the VIS Read-out Shutter Unit, whose main function is to prevent direct light from falling onto the VIS CCDs during the read-out of the scientific exposures and to allow the dark-current/bias calibrations of the instrument.
  • Context. Galaxy clusters are continuously growing through the accretion of matter in their outskirts. This process induces inhomogeneities in the gas density distribution (clumping) which need to be taken into account to recover the physical properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) at large radii. Aims. We studied the thermodynamic properties in the outskirts (R > R500) of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2142 by combining the Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) effect with the X-ray signal. Methods. We combined the SZ pressure profile measured by Planck with the XMM-Newton gas density profile to recover radial profiles of temperature, entropy and hydrostatic mass out to 2R500. We used a method that is insensitive to clumping to recover the gas density, and we compared the results with traditional X-ray measurement techniques. Results. When taking clumping into account, our joint SZ/X-ray entropy profile is consistent with the predictions from pure gravitational collapse, whereas a significant entropy flattening is found when the effect of clumping is neglected. The hydrostatic mass profile recovered using joint X-ray/SZ data agrees with that obtained from spectroscopic X-ray measurements and with mass reconstructions obtained through weak lensing and galaxy kinematics. Conclusions. We found that clumping can explain the entropy flattening observed by Suzaku in the outskirts of several clusters. When using a method insensitive to clumping for the reconstruction of the gas density, the thermodynamic properties of Abell 2142 are compatible with the assumption that the thermal gas pressure sustains gravity and that the entropy is injected at accretion shocks, with no need to evoke more exotic physics. Our results highlight the need for X-ray observations with sufficient spatial resolution, and large collecting area, to understand the processes at work in cluster outer regions.
  • In this paper we investigate the impact of different star formation histories (SFHs) on the relation between stellar mass M$_{*}$ and star formation rate (SFR) using a sample of galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshift zspec>2 drawn from the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS). We produce an extensive database of dusty model galaxies, calculated starting from the new library of single stellar population (SSPs) models presented in Cassara' et al. 2013 and weighted by a set of 28 different SFHs based on the Schmidt function, and characterized by different ratios of the gas infall time scale $\tau_{infall}$ to the star formation efficiency $\nu$. The treatment of dust extinction and re-emission has been carried out by means of the radiative transfer calculation. The spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting technique is performed by using GOSSIP+, a tool able to combine both photometric and spectroscopic information to extract the best value of the physical quantities of interest, and to consider the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) attenuation as a free parameter. We find that the main contribution to the scatter observed in the $SFR-M_{*}$ plane is the possibility of choosing between different families of SFHs in the SED fitting procedure, while the redshift range plays a minor role. The majority of the galaxies, at all cosmic times, are best-fit by models with SFHs characterized by a high $\tau_{\rm infall}/\nu$ ratio. We discuss the reliability of the presence of a small percentage of dusty and highly star forming galaxies, in the light of their detection in the FIR.
  • The XMM-LSS, XMM-COSMOS, and XMM-CDFS surveys are complementary in terms of sky coverage and depth. Together, they form a clean sample with the least possible variance in instrument effective areas and PSF. Therefore this is one of the best samples available to determine the 2-10 keV luminosity function of AGN and its evolution. The samples and the relevant corrections for incompleteness are described. A total of 2887 AGN is used to build the LF in the luminosity interval 10^42-10^46 erg/s, and in the redshift interval 0.001-4. A new method to correct for absorption by considering the probability distribution for the column density conditioned on the hardness ratio is presented. The binned luminosity function and its evolution is determined with a variant of the Page-Carrera method, improved to include corrections for absorption and to account for the full probability distribution of photometric redshifts. Parametric models, namely a double power-law with LADE or LDDE evolution, are explored using Bayesian inference. We introduce the Watanabe-Akaike information criterion (WAIC) to compare the models and estimate their predictive power. Our data are best described by the LADE model, as hinted by the WAIC indicator. We also explore the 15-parameter extended LDDE model recently proposed by Ueda et al., and find that this extension is not supported by our data. The strength of our method is that it provides: un-absorbed non-parametric estimates; credible intervals for luminosity function parameters; model choice according to which one has more predictive power for future data.
  • In 2013 we conducted a large multi-wavelength campaign on the archetypical Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. Unexpectedly, this usually unobscured source appeared strongly absorbed in the soft X-rays during the entire campaign, and signatures of new and strong outflows were present in the almost simultaneous UV HST/COS data. Here we carry out a comprehensive spectral analysis of all available XMM-Newton observations of NGC 5548 (for a total of ~763 ks) in combination with 3 simultaneous NuSTAR obs. We obtain a best-fit composed by i) a weakly varying flat (Gamma~1.5-1.7) power-law component; ii) a constant, cold reflection (FeK + continuum) component; iii) a soft excess, possibly due to thermal Comptonization; and iv) a constant, ionized scattered emission-line dominated component. Our main findings are that, during the 2013 campaign, the first 3 of these components appear to be partially covered by a heavy and variable obscurer located along the l.o.s. that is consistent with a multilayer of cold and mildly ionized gas. We characterize in detail the short timescale (~ks-to-days) spectral variability of this new obscurer, and find it is mostly due to a combination of Nh and Cf variations, on top of intrinsic power-law variations. In addition, our best-fit spectrum is left with several (but marginal) absorption features at rest-frame energies ~6.7-6.9 keV and ~8 keV, as well as a weak broad emission line feature redwards of the 6.4 keV emission line. These could indicate a more complex underlying model, e.g. a P-Cygni-type profile if allowing for a large velocity and wide-angle outflow. These findings are consistent with a picture where the obscurer represents the manifestation along the l.o.s. of a multilayer of gas that is likely outflowing at high speed, and simultaneously producing heavy obscuration and scattering in the X-rays and broad absorption features in the UV.
  • X-ray extragalactic surveys are ideal laboratories for the study of the evolution and clustering of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The XXL Survey spans two fields of a combined 50 $deg^2$ observed for more than 6Ms with XMM-Newton, occupying the parameter space between deep surveys and very wide area surveys; at the same time it benefits from a wealth of ancillary data. This paper marks the first release of the XXL point source catalogue selected in the 2-10 keV energy band with limiting flux $F_{2-10keV}=4.8\cdot10^{-14}\rm{erg\,s^{-1}\,cm^{-2}}$. We use both public and proprietary data sets to identify the counterparts of the X-ray point-like sources and improved upon the photometric redshift determination for AGN by applying a Random Forest classification trained to identify for each object the optimal photometric redshift model library. We also assign a probability to each source to be a star or an outlier. We model with Bayesian analysis the X-ray spectra assuming a power-law model with the presence of an absorbing medium. We find an average unabsorbed photon index of $\Gamma=1.85$ and average hydrogen column density $\log{N_{H}}=21.07 cm^{-2}$. We find no trend of $\Gamma$ or $N_H$ with redshift and a fraction of 26% absorbed sources ($\log N_{H}>22$). We show that the XXL-1000-AGN number counts extended the number counts of the COSMOS survey to higher fluxes and are fully consistent with the Euclidean expectation. We constrain the intrinsic luminosity function of AGN in the 2-10 keV energy band where the unabsorbed X-ray flux is estimated from the X-ray spectral fit up to z=3. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of a supercluster size structure at redshift 0.14, identified by means of percolation analysis of the XXL-1000-AGN sample. The XXL survey, reaching a medium flux limit and covering a wide area is a stepping stone between current deep fields and planned wide area surveys.
  • Hard X-ray spectra of 28 bright Seyfert galaxies observed with INTEGRAL were analyzed together with the X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton, Suzaku and RXTE. These broad-band data were fitted with a model assuming a thermal Comptonization as a primary continuum component. We tested several model options through a fitting of the Comptonized continuum accompanied by a complex absorption and a Compton reflection. Both the large data set used and the model space explored allowed us to accurately determine a mean temperature kTe of the electron plasma, the Compton parameter y and the Compton reflection strength R for the majority of objects in the sample. Our main finding is that a vast majority of the sample (20 objects) is characterized by kTe < 100 keV, and only for two objects we found kTe > 200 keV. The median kTe for entire sample is 48(-14,+57) keV. The distribution of the y parameter is bimodal, with a broad component centered at ~0.8 and a narrow peak at ~1.1. A complex, dual absorber model improved the fit for all data sets, compared to a simple absorption model, reducing the fitted strength of Compton reflection by a factor of about 2. Modest reflection (median R ~0.32) together with a high ratio of Comptonized to seed photon fluxes point towards a geometry with a compact hard X-ray emitting region well separated from the accretion disc. Our results imply that the template Seyferts spectra used in AGN population synthesis models should be revised.
  • We present our investigation into the long-term variability of the X-ray obscuration and optical-UV-X-ray continuum in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. In 2013 and 2014, the Swift observatory monitored NGC 5548 on average every day or two, with archival observations reaching back to 2005, totalling about 670 ks of observing time. Both broadband spectral modelling and temporal rms variability analysis are applied to the Swift data. We disentangle the variability caused by absorption, due to an obscuring weakly-ionised outflow near the disk, from variability of the intrinsic continuum components (the soft X-ray excess and the power-law) originating from the disk and its associated coronae. The spectral model that we apply to this extensive Swift data is the global model that we derived for NGC 5548 from analysis of the stacked spectra from our multi-satellite campaign of summer 2013 (including XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and HST). The results of our Swift study show that changes in the covering fraction of the obscurer is the primary and dominant cause of variability in the soft X-ray band on timescales of 10 days to ~ 5 months. The obscuring covering fraction of the X-ray source is found to range between 0.7 and nearly 1.0. The contribution of the soft excess component to the X-ray variability is often much less than that of the obscurer, but it becomes comparable when the optical-UV continuum flares up. We find that the soft excess is consistent with being the high-energy tail of the optical-UV continuum and can be explained by warm Comptonisation: up-scattering of the disk seed photons in a warm, optically thick corona as part of the inner disk. To this date, the Swift monitoring of NGC 5548 shows that the obscurer has been continuously present in our line of sight for at least 4 years (since at least February 2012).
  • The active galactic nuclei X-ray luminosity function traces actively accreting supermassive black holes and is essential for the study of the properties of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) population, black hole evolution, and galaxy-black hole coevolution. Up to now, the AGN luminosity function has been estimated several times in soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard X-rays (2-10 keV). AGN selection in these energy ranges often suffers from identification and redshift incompleteness and, at the same time, photoelectric absorption can obscure a significant amount of the X-ray radiation. We estimate the evolution of the luminosity function in the 5-10 keV band, where we effectively avoid the absorbed part of the spectrum, rendering absorption corrections unnecessary up to NH=10^23 cm^-2. Our dataset is a compilation of six wide, and deep fields: MAXI, HBSS, XMM-COSMOS, Lockman Hole, XMM-CDFS, AEGIS-XD, Chandra-COSMOS, and Chandra-CDFS. This extensive sample of ~1110 AGN (0.01<z<4.0, 41<log L_x<46) is 98% redshift complete with 68% spectroscopic redshifts. We use Bayesian analysis to select the best parametric model from simple pure luminosity and pure density evolution to more complicated luminosity and density evolution and luminosity-dependent density evolution. We estimate the model parameters that describe best our dataset separately for each survey and for the combined sample. We show that, according to Bayesian model selection, the preferred model for our dataset is the luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE). Our estimation of the AGN luminosity function does not require any assumption on the AGN absorption and is in good agreement with previous works in the 2-10 keV energy band based on X-ray hardness ratios to model the absorption in AGN up to redshift three. Our sample does not show evidence of a rapid decline of the AGN luminosity function up to redshift four. [abridged]
  • The aim of this paper is to investigate spectral and photometric properties of 854 faint ($i_{AB}$<~25 mag) star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2<z<2.5 using the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS) spectroscopic data and deep multi-wavelength photometric data in three extensively studied extragalactic fields (ECDFS, VVDS, COSMOS). These SFGs were targeted for spectroscopy based on their photometric redshifts. The VUDS spectra are used to measure the UV spectral slopes ($\beta$) as well as Ly$\alpha$ equivalent widths (EW). On average, the spectroscopically measured $\beta$ (-1.36$\pm$0.02), is comparable to the photometrically measured $\beta$ (-1.32$\pm$0.02), and has smaller measurement uncertainties. The positive correlation of $\beta$ with the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED)-based measurement of dust extinction, E$_{\rm s}$(B-V), emphasizes the importance of $\beta$ as an alternative dust indicator at high redshifts. To make a proper comparison, we divide these SFGs into three subgroups based on their rest-frame Ly$\alpha$ EW: SFGs with no Ly$\alpha$ emission (SFG$_{\rm N}$; EW$\le$0\AA), SFGs with Ly$\alpha$ emission (SFG$_{\rm L}$; EW$>$0\AA), and Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAEs; EW$\ge$20\AA). The fraction of LAEs at these redshifts is $\sim$10%, which is consistent with previous observations. We compared best-fit SED-estimated stellar parameters of the SFG$_{\rm N}$, SFG$_{\rm L}$ and LAE samples. For the luminosities probed here ($\sim$L$^*$), we find that galaxies with and without Ly$\alpha$ in emission have small but significant differences in their SED-based properties. We find that LAEs have less dust, and lower star-formation rates (SFR) compared to non-LAEs. We also find that LAEs are less massive compared to non-LAEs, though the difference is smaller and less significant compared to the SFR and E$_{\rm s}$(B-V). [abridged]
  • We present the XXL Survey, the largest XMM programme totaling some 6.9 Ms to date and involving an international consortium of roughly 100 members. The XXL Survey covers two extragalactic areas of 25 deg2 each at a point-source sensitivity of ~ 5E-15 erg/sec/cm2 in the [0.5-2] keV band (completeness limit). The survey's main goals are to provide constraints on the dark energy equation of state from the space-time distribution of clusters of galaxies and to serve as a pathfinder for future, wide-area X-ray missions. We review science objectives, including cluster studies, AGN evolution, and large-scale structure, that are being conducted with the support of approximately 30 follow-up programmes. We describe the 542 XMM observations along with the associated multi-lambda and numerical simulation programmes. We give a detailed account of the X-ray processing steps and describe innovative tools being developed for the cosmological analysis. The paper provides a thorough evaluation of the X-ray data, including quality controls, photon statistics, exposure and background maps, and sky coverage. Source catalogue construction and multi-lambda associations are briefly described. This material will be the basis for the calculation of the cluster and AGN selection functions, critical elements of the cosmological and science analyses. The XXL multi-lambda data set will have a unique lasting legacy value for cosmological and extragalactic studies and will serve as a calibration resource for future dark energy studies with clusters and other X-ray selected sources. With the present article, we release the XMM XXL photon and smoothed images along with the corresponding exposure maps. The XMM XXL observation list (Table B.1) is available in electronic form at the CDS. The present paper is the first in a series reporting results of the XXL-XMM survey.