• We report the detection of diffuse radio emission which might be connected to a large-scale filament of the cosmic web covering a 8deg x 8deg area in the sky, likely associated with a z~0.1 over-density traced by nine massive galaxy clusters. In this work, we present radio observations of this region taken with the Sardinia Radio Telescope. Two of the clusters in the field host a powerful radio halo sustained by violent ongoing mergers and provide direct proof of intra-cluster magnetic fields. In order to investigate the presence of large-scale diffuse radio synchrotron emission in and beyond the galaxy clusters in this complex system, we combined the data taken at 1.4 GHz obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope with higher resolution data taken with the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. We found 28 candidate new sources with a size larger and X-ray emission fainter than known diffuse large-scale synchrotron cluster sources for a given radio power. This new population is potentially the tip of the iceberg of a class of diffuse large-scale synchrotron sources associated with the filaments of the cosmic web. In addition, we found in the field a candidate new giant radio galaxy.
  • Diagnostics of polarized emission provide us with valuable information on the Galactic magnetic field and the state of turbulence in the interstellar medium, which cannot be obtained from synchrotron intensity alone. In Paper I (Herron et al. 2017b), we derived polarization diagnostics that are rotationally and translationally invariant in the $Q$-$U$ plane, similar to the polarization gradient. In this paper, we apply these diagnostics to simulations of ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that have a range of sonic and Alfv\'enic Mach numbers. We generate synthetic images of Stokes $Q$ and $U$ for these simulations, for the cases where the turbulence is illuminated from behind by uniform polarized emission, and where the polarized emission originates from within the turbulent volume. From these simulated images we calculate the polarization diagnostics derived in Paper I, for different lines of sight relative to the mean magnetic field, and for a range of frequencies. For all of our simulations, we find that the polarization gradient is very similar to the generalized polarization gradient, and that both trace spatial variations in the magnetoionic medium for the case where emission originates within the turbulent volume, provided that the medium is not supersonic. We propose a method for distinguishing the cases of emission coming from behind or within a turbulent, Faraday rotating medium, and a method to partly map the rotation measure of the observed region. We also speculate on statistics of these diagnostics that may allow us to constrain the physical properties of an observed turbulent region.
  • We analyze the Southern Sky emission in linear polarization at 2.3 GHz as observed by the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey S-PASS. Our purpose is to study the properties of the diffuse Galactic polarized synchrotron as a contaminant to CMB B-mode observations. We study the angular distribution of the S-PASS signal at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes by means of angular power spectra. Power spectra, show a decay of the spectral amplitude as a function of multipole for \ell<200, typical of the diffuse emission. Spectra can be approximated by a power law C_{\ell}\propto\ell^{alpha}, with alpha~-3, and characterized by a B-to-E ratio of ~0.5. We study the synchrotron SED in polarization by computing power spectra of the low frequency WMAP and Planck maps. Results show that the SED, in the frequency range 2.3-33 GHz, is compatible with a power law with beta_s=-3.22\pm0.08. Combining S-PASS polarization maps with those coming from WMAP and Planck we derived a map of the synchrotron spectral index at angular resolution of 2{\deg} on about 30% of the sky. The recovered distribution peaks at the value around -3.2. We also measure a significant spatial correlation between synchrotron and thermal dust signals, as traced by the Planck 353 GHz channel. This correlation reaches about 40% on the larger angular scales, decaying considerably at the degree scales. Finally, we use the S-PASS maps to assess the polarized synchrotron contamination to CMB observations of the B-modes. Moreover, by combining S-PASS data with Planck 353 GHz observations, we recover a map of the minimum level of total polarized foreground contamination to B-modes, finding that there is no region of the sky, at any frequency, where this contamination lies below equivalent tenor-to-scalar ratio ~10^-3. This result confirms the importance of observing both high and low frequency foregrounds in CMB B-mode measurements.
  • We present new radio and optical images of the nearest radio galaxy Centaurus A and its host galaxy NGC 5128. We focus our investigation on the northern transition region, where energy is transported from the ~5 kpc (~5 arcmin) scales of the Northern Inner Lobe (NIL) to the ~30 kpc (~30 arcmin) scales of the Northern Middle Lobe (NML). Our Murchison Widefield Array observations at 154 MHz and our Parkes radio telescope observations at 2.3 GHz show diffuse radio emission connecting the NIL to the NML, in agreement with previous Australia Telescope Compact Array observations at 1.4 GHz. Comparison of these radio data with our widefield optical emission line images show the relationship between the NML radio emission and the ionised filaments that extend north from the NIL, and reveal a new ionised filament to the east, possibly associated with a galactic wind. Our deep optical images show clear evidence for a bipolar outflow from the central galaxy extending to intermediate scales, despite the non-detection of a southern radio counterpart to the NML. Thus, our observational overview of Centaurus A reveals a number of features proposed to be associated with AGN feedback mechanisms, often cited as likely to have significant effects in galaxy evolution models. As one of the closest galaxies to us, Centaurus A therefore provides a unique laboratory to examine feedback mechanisms in detail.
  • We observed the galaxy cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 with the Sardinia Radio Telescope to provide new constraints on its spectral properties at high frequency. We conducted observations in three frequency bands centred at 1.4 GHz, 6.6 GHz and 19 GHz, resulting in beam resolutions of 14$^{\prime}$, 2.9$^{\prime}$ and 1$^{\prime}$ respectively. These single-dish data were also combined with archival interferometric observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. From the combined images, we measured a flux density of ${\rm S_{1.4GHz}=(158.3\pm9.6)\,mJy}$ for the central radio halo and ${\rm S_{1.4GHz}=(126\pm8)\,mJy}$ and ${\rm S_{1.4GHz}=(11.7\pm0.7)\,mJy}$ for the northern and the southern relic respectively. After the spectral modelling of the discrete sources, we measured at 6.6 GHz ${\rm S_{6.6GHz}=(17.1\pm1.2)\,mJy}$ and ${\rm S_{6.6GHz}=(0.6\pm0.3)\,mJy}$ for the northern and southern relic respectively. Assuming simple diffusive shock acceleration, we interpret measurements of the northern relic with a continuous injection model represented by a broken power-law. This yields an injection spectral index ${\rm \alpha_{inj}=0.7\pm0.1}$ and a Mach number ${\rm M=3.3\pm0.9}$, consistent with recent X-ray estimates. Unlike other studies of the same object, no significant steepening of the relic radio emission is seen in data up to 8.35 GHz. By fitting the southern relic spectrum with a simple power-law (${\rm S_{\nu}\propto\nu^{-\alpha}}$) we obtained a spectral index ${\rm \alpha\approx1.9}$ corresponding to a Mach number (${\rm M\approx1.8}$) in agreement with X-ray estimates. Finally, we evaluated the rotation measure of the northern relic at 6.6 GHz. These results provide new insights on the magnetic structure of the relic, but further observations are needed to clarify the nature of the observed Faraday rotation.
  • Observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) are a powerful tool for investigating the later stages of stellar evolution, the properties of the ambient interstellar medium, and the physics of particle acceleration and shocks. For a fraction of SNRs, multi-wavelength coverage from radio to ultra high-energies has been provided, constraining their contributions to the production of Galactic cosmic rays. Although radio emission is the most common identifier of SNRs and a prime probe for refining models, high-resolution images at frequencies above 5 GHz are surprisingly lacking, even for bright and well-known SNRs such as IC443 and W44. In the frameworks of the Astronomical Validation and Early Science Program with the 64-m single-dish Sardinia Radio Telescope, we provided, for the first time, single-dish deep imaging at 7 GHz of the IC443 and W44 complexes coupled with spatially-resolved spectra in the 1.5-7 GHz frequency range. Our images were obtained through on-the-fly mapping techniques, providing antenna beam oversampling and resulting in accurate continuum flux density measurements. The integrated flux densities associated with IC443 are S_1.5GHz = 134 +/- 4 Jy and S_7GHz = 67 +/- 3 Jy. For W44, we measured total flux densities of S_1.5GHz = 214 +/- 6 Jy and S_7GHz = 94 +/- 4 Jy. Spectral index maps provide evidence of a wide physical parameter scatter among different SNR regions: a flat spectrum is observed from the brightest SNR regions at the shock, while steeper spectral indices (up to 0.7) are observed in fainter cooling regions, disentangling in this way different populations and spectra of radio/gamma-ray-emitting electrons in these SNRs.
  • [Abridged] The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is the new 64-m dish operated by INAF (Italy). Its active surface will allow us to observe at frequencies of up to 116 GHz. At the moment, three receivers, one per focal position, have been installed and tested. The SRT was officially opened in October 2013, upon completion of its technical commissioning phase. In this paper, we provide an overview of the main science drivers for the SRT, describe the main outcomes from the scientific commissioning of the telescope, and discuss a set of observations demonstrating the SRT's scientific capabilities. One of the main objectives of scientific commissioning was the identification of deficiencies in the instrumentation and/or in the telescope sub-systems for further optimization. As a result, the overall telescope performance has been significantly improved. As part of the scientific commissioning activities, different observing modes were tested and validated, and first astronomical observations were carried out to demonstrate the science capabilities of the SRT. In addition, we developed astronomer-oriented software tools, to support future observers on-site. The astronomical validation activities were prioritized based on technical readiness and scientific impact. The highest priority was to make the SRT available for joint observations as part of European networks. As a result, the SRT started to participate (in shared-risk mode) in EVN (European VLBI Network) and LEAP (Large European Array for Pulsars) observing sessions in early 2014. The validation of single-dish operations for the suite of SRT first light receivers and backends continued in the following years, and was concluded with the first call for shared-risk/early-science observations issued at the end of 2015.
  • We study the intra-cluster magnetic field in the poor galaxy cluster Abell 194 by complementing radio data, at different frequencies, with data in the optical and X-ray bands. We analyze new total intensity and polarization observations of Abell 194 obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT). We use the SRT data in combination with archival Very Large Array observations to derive both the spectral aging and Rotation Measure (RM) images of the radio galaxies 3C40A and 3C40B embedded in Abell 194. The optical analysis indicates that Abell 194 does not show a major and recent cluster merger, but rather agrees with a scenario of accretion of small groups. Under the minimum energy assumption, the lifetimes of synchrotron electrons in 3C40B measured from the spectral break are found to be 157 Myrs. The break frequency image and the electron density profile inferred from the X-ray emission are used in combination with the RM data to constrain the intra-cluster magnetic field power spectrum. By assuming a Kolmogorov power law power spectrum, we find that the RM data in Abell 194 are well described by a magnetic field with a maximum scale of fluctuations of Lambda_max=64 kpc and a central magnetic field strength of <B0>=1.5 microG. Further out, the field decreases with the radius following the gas density to the power of eta=1.1. Comparing Abell 194 with a small sample of galaxy clusters, there is a hint of a trend between central electron densities and magnetic field strengths.
  • We set limits on the presence of the synchrotron cosmic web through the cross-correlation of the 2.3 GHz S-PASS survey with a model of the local cosmic web derived from constrained magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The MHD simulation assumes cosmologically seeded magnetic fields amplified during large-scale structure formation, and a population of relativistic electrons/positrons from proton-proton collisions within the intergalactic medium. We set a model-dependent 3$\sigma$ upper limit on the synchrotron surface brightness of 0.16 mJy arcmin$^{-2}$ at 2.3 GHz in filaments. Extrapolating from magnetic field maps created from the simulation, we infer an upper limit (density-weighted) magnetic field of 0.03 (0.13) $\mu$G in filaments at the current epoch, and a limit on the primordial magnetic field (PMF) of B$_{PMF}$~1.0 nG.
  • We compare two rotationally invariant decomposition techniques on linear polarisation data: the spin-2 spherical harmonic decomposition in two opposite parities, the $E$- and $B$-mode, and the multiscale analysis of the gradient of linear polarisation, $|\nabla \mathbf{P}|$. We demonstrate that both decompositions have similar properties in the image domain and the spatial frequency domain. They can be used as complementary tools for turbulence analysis of interstellar magnetic fields in order to develop a better understanding of the origin of energy sources for the turbulence, the origin of peculiar magnetic field structures and their underlying physics. We also introduce a new quantity $|\nabla EB|$ based on the $E$- and $B$-modes and we show that in the intermediate and small scales limit $|\nabla EB| \simeq |\nabla \mathbf{P}|$. Analysis of the 2.3 GHz S-band Polarization All Sky Survey (S -PASS) shows many extended coherent filament-like features appearing as 'double-jumps' in the $|\nabla \mathbf{P}|$ map that are correlated with negative and positive filaments of $B$-type polarisation. These local asymmetries between the two polarisation types, $E$ and $B$, of the non-thermal Galactic synchrotron emission have an influence on the $E$- and $B$-mode power spectra analyses. The wavelet-based formalism of the polarisation gradient analysis allows us to locate the position of $E$- or $B$-mode features responsible for the local asymmetries between the two polarisation types. In analysed subregions, the perturbations of the magnetic field are trigged by star clusters associated with HII regions, the Orion-Eridanus superbubble and the North Polar Spur at low Galactic latitude.
  • The S-band Polarisation All-Sky Survey (S-PASS) has observed the entire southern sky using the 64-metre Parkes radio telescope at 2.3GHz with an effective bandwidth of 184MHz. The surveyed sky area covers all declinations $\delta\leq 0^\circ$. To analyse compact sources the survey data have been re-processed to produce a set of 107 Stokes $I$ maps with 10.75arcmin resolution and the large scale emission contribution filtered out. In this paper we use these Stokes $I$ images to create a total intensity southern-sky extragalactic source catalogue at 2.3GHz. The source catalogue contains 23,389 sources and covers a sky area of 16,600deg$^2$, excluding the Galactic plane for latitudes $|b|<10^\circ$. Approximately 8% of catalogued sources are resolved. S-PASS source positions are typically accurate to within 35arcsec. At a flux density of 225mJy the S-PASS source catalogue is more than 95% complete, and $\sim$94% of S-PASS sources brighter than 500mJy beam$^{-1}$ have a counterpart at lower frequencies.
  • We present a multiwavelength study of GRB 151027A. This is the 999th GRB detected by the Swift satellite and it has a densely sampled emission in the X-ray and optical band and has been observed and detected in the radio up to 140 days after the prompt. The multiwavelength light curve from 500 s to 140 days can be modelled through a standard forward shock afterglow but requires an additional component to reproduce the early X-ray and optical emission. We present TNG and LBT optical observations performed 19.6, 33.9 and 92.3 days after the trigger which show a bump with respect to a standard afterglow flux decay and are possibly interpreted as due to the underlying SN and host galaxy (of 0.4 uJy in the R band). Radio observations, performed with SRT, Medicina, EVN and VLBA between day 4 and 140, suggest that the burst exploded in an environment characterised by a density profile scaling with the distance from the source (wind profile). A remarkable feature of the prompt emission is the presence of a bright flare 100 s after the trigger, lasting 70 seconds in the soft X-ray band, which was simultaneously detected from the optical band up to the MeV energy range. By combining Swift-BAT/XRT and Fermi-GBM data, the broadband (0.3-1000 keV) time resolved spectral analysis of the flare reveals the coexistence of a non-thermal (power law) and thermal blackbody components. The BB component contributes up to 35% of the luminosity in the 0.3-1000 keV band. The gamma-ray emission observed in Swift-BAT and Fermi-GBM anticipates and lasts less than the soft X-ray emission as observed by Swift-XRT, arguing against a Comptonization origin. The BB component could either be produced by an outflow becoming transparent or by the collision of a fast shell with a slow, heavy and optically thick fireball ejected during the quiescent time interval between the initial and later flares of the burst.
  • We present new observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129 obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope in the frequency range 6000-7200 MHz, with the aim to image the large-angular-scale emission at high-frequency of the radio sources located in this cluster of galaxies. The data were acquired using the recently-commissioned ROACH2-based backend to produce full-Stokes image cubes of an area of 1 deg x 1 deg centered on the radio source 3C 129. We modeled and deconvolved the telescope beam pattern from the data. We also measured the instrumental polarization beam patterns to correct the polarization images for off-axis instrumental polarization. Total intensity images at an angular resolution of 2.9 arcmin were obtained for the tailed radio galaxy 3C 129 and for 13 more sources in the field, including 3C 129.1 at the galaxy cluster center. These data were used, in combination with literature data at lower frequencies, to derive the variation of the synchrotron spectrum of 3C 129 along the tail of the radio source. If the magnetic field is at the equipartition value, we showed that the lifetimes of radiating electrons result in a radiative age for 3C 129 of t_syn = 267 +/- 26 Myrs. Assuming a linear projected length of 488 kpc for the tail, we deduced that 3C 129 is moving supersonically with a Mach number of M=v_gal/c_s=1.47. Linearly polarized emission was clearly detected for both 3C 129 and 3C 129.1. The linear polarization measured for 3C 129 reaches levels as high as 70% in the faintest region of the source where the magnetic field is aligned with the direction of the tail.
  • In the period 2012 June - 2013 October, the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) went through the technical commissioning phase. The characterization involved three first-light receivers, ranging in frequency between 300MHz and 26GHz, connected to a Total Power back-end. It also tested and employed the telescope active surface installed in the main reflector of the antenna. The instrument status and performance proved to be in good agreement with the expectations in terms of surface panels alignment (at present 300 um rms to be improved with microwave holography), gain (~0.6 K/Jy in the given frequency range), pointing accuracy (5 arcsec at 22 GHz) and overall single-dish operational capabilities. Unresolved issues include the commissioning of the receiver centered at 350 MHz, which was compromised by several radio frequency interferences, and a lower-than-expected aperture efficiency for the 22-GHz receiver when pointing at low elevations. Nevertheless, the SRT, at present completing its Astronomical Validation phase, is positively approaching its opening to the scientific community.
  • The Gum Nebula is 36 degree wide shell-like emission nebula at a distance of only 450 pc. It has been hypothesised to be an old supernova remnant, fossil HII region, wind-blown bubble, or combination of multiple objects. Here we investigate the magneto-ionic properties of the nebula using data from recent surveys: radio-continuum data from the NRAO VLA and S-band Parkes All Sky Surveys, and H-alpha data from the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas. We model the upper part of the nebula as a spherical shell of ionised gas expanding into the ambient medium. We perform a maximum-likelihood Markov chain Monte-Carlo fit to the NVSS rotation measure data, using the H-halpha data to constrain average electron density in the shell $n_e$. Assuming a latitudinal background gradient in RM we find $n_e=1.3^{+0.4}_{-0.4} {\rm cm}^{-3}$, angular radius $\phi_{\rm outer}=22.7^{+0.1}_{-0.1} {\rm deg}$, shell thickness $dr=18.5^{+1.5}_{-1.4} {\rm pc}$, ambient magnetic field strength $B_0=3.9^{+4.9}_{-2.2} \mu{\rm G}$ and warm gas filling factor $f=0.3^{+0.3}_{-0.1}$. We constrain the local, small-scale (~260 pc) pitch-angle of the ordered Galactic magnetic field to $+7^{\circ}\lesssim\wp\lesssim+44^{\circ}$, which represents a significant deviation from the median field orientation on kiloparsec scales (~-7.2$^{\circ}$). The moderate compression factor $X=6.0\,^{+5.1}_{-2.5}$ at the edge of the H-alpha shell implies that the 'old supernova remnant' origin is unlikely. Our results support a model of the nebula as a HII region around a wind-blown bubble. Analysis of depolarisation in 2.3 GHz S-PASS data is consistent with this hypothesis and our best-fitting values agree well with previous studies of interstellar bubbles.
  • Radio synchrotron polarization maps of the Galaxy can be used to infer the properties of interstellar turbulence in the diffuse warm ionized medium (WIM). In this paper, we investigate the spatial gradient of linearly polarized synchrotron emission ($|\nabla\textbf{P}|/|\textbf{P}|$) as a tracer of turbulence, the relationship of the gradient to the sonic Mach number of the WIM, and changes in morphology of the gradient as a function of Galactic position in the southern sky. We use data from the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey (S-PASS) to image the spatial gradient of the linearly polarized synchrotron emission ($|\nabla \textbf{P}|/|\textbf{P}|$) of the entire southern sky at $2.3$~GHz. The spatial gradient of linear polarization reveals rapid changes of the density and magnetic fluctuations in the WIM due to magnetic turbulence as a function of Galactic position; we make comparisons of these data to ideal MHD numerical simulations. In order to constrain the sonic Mach number ($M_{s}$), we apply a high order moments analysis to the observations and to the simulated diffuse, isothermal ISM with ideal magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence. We find that polarization gradient maps reveal elongated structures, which we associate with turbulence in the ISM. Our analysis corroborates the view of a turbulent WIM in a transonic regime $M_{s}\lesssim 2$. Filamentary structures with typical widths down to the angular resolution are seen and the observed morphologies match closely with numerical simulations and in some cases H$\alpha$ contours. The $|\nabla \textbf{P}|/|\textbf{P}|$ intensity is found to be approximately log-normal distributed. No systematic variations of the sonic Mach number are observed as a function of Galactic coordinates, which is consistent with turbulence in the WIM inferred by the analysis of H$\alpha$ data.
  • We have detected a radio bridge of unpolarized synchrotron emission connecting the NW relic of the galaxy cluster Abell 3667 to its central regions. We used data at 2.3 GHz from the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey (S-PASS) and at 3.3 GHz from a follow up observation, both conducted with the Parkes Radio Telescope. This emission is further aligned with a diffuse X-ray tail, and represents the most compelling evidence for an association between intracluster medium turbulence and diffuse synchrotron emission. This is the first clear detection of a bridge associated both with an outlying cluster relic and X-ray diffuse emission. All the indicators point toward the synchrotron bridge being related to the post-shock turbulent wake trailing the shock front generated by a major merger in a massive cluster. Although predicted by simulations, this is the first time such emission is detected with high significance and clearly associated with the path of a confirmed shock. Although the origin of the relativistic electrons is still unknown, the turbulent re-acceleration model provides a natural explanation for the large-scale emission. The equipartition magnetic field intensity of the bridge is B_eq = 2.2 +/- 0.3 \mu G. We further detect diffuse emission coincident with the central regions of the cluster for the first time.
  • The nucleus of the Milky Way is known to harbour regions of intense star formation activity as well as a super-massive black hole. Recent Fermi space telescope observations have revealed regions of \gamma-ray emission reaching far above and below the Galactic Centre, the so-called Fermi bubbles. It is uncertain whether these were generated by nuclear star formation or by quasar-like outbursts of the central black hole and no information on the structures' magnetic field has been reported. Here we report on the detection of two giant, linearly-polarized radio Lobes, containing three ridge-like sub-structures, emanating from the Galactic Centre. The Lobes each extend ~60 deg, bear a close correspondence to the Fermi bubbles, are located in the Galactic bulge, and are permeated by strong magnetic fields of up to 15 \mu G. Our data signal that the radio Lobes originate in a bi-conical, star-formation (rather than black hole) driven outflow from the Galaxy's central 200 pc that transports a massive magnetic energy of ~10^55 erg into the Galactic halo. The ridges wind around this outflow and, we suggest, constitute a `phonographic' record of nuclear star formation activity over at least 10 Myr.
  • We present observations and CMB foreground analysis of the Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey (PGMS), an investigation of the Galactic latitude behaviour of the polarized synchrotron emission at 2.3 GHz with the Parkes Radio Telescope. The survey consists of a 5-deg wide strip along the Galactic meridian l=254-deg extending from Galactic plane to South Galactic pole. We identify three zones distinguished by polarized emission properties: the disc, the halo, and a transition region connecting them. The halo section lies at latitudes |b| > 40-deg and has weak and smooth polarized emission mostly at large scale with steep angular power spectra of median slope $\beta_{\rm med} \sim -2.6$. The disc region covers the latitudes |b|<20-deg and has a brighter, more complex emission dominated by the small scales with flatter spectra of median slope $\beta_{\rm med} = -1.8$. The transition region has steep spectra as in the halo, but the emission increases toward the Galactic plane from halo to disc levels. The change of slope and emission structure at $b \sim -20\degr$ is sudden, indicating a sharp disc-halo transition. The whole halo section is just one environment extended over 50-deg with very low emission which, once scaled to 70GHz, is equivalent to the CMB B-Mode emission for a tensor-to-scalar perturbation power ratio r_halo = 3.3 +/- 0.4 x 10^{-3}. Applying a conservative cleaning procedure, we estimate an r detection limit of $\delta r \sim 2\times 10^{-3}$ at 70~GHz (3-sigma C.L.) and, assuming a dust polariztion fraction <12%, $\delta r \sim 1\times 10^{-2}$ at 150~GHz. The 150-GHz limit matches the goals of planned sub-orbital experiments, which can therefore be conducted at this high frequency. The 70-GHz limit is close to the goal of proposed next generation space missions, which thus might not strictly require space-based platforms.
  • The Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey (PGMS) is a 5 deg X 90 deg strip to map the polarized synchrotron emission along a Galactic meridian from the Galactic plane down to the south Galactic pole. The survey is carried out at the Parkes radio telescope at a frequency of 2.3 GHz with 30 adjacent 8-MHz bands which enable Faraday Rotation studies. The scientific goal is twofold: (1) To probe the Galactic magnetism off the Galactic plane of which little is known so far. PGMS gives an insight into the Galactic magnetic field in the thick disc, halo, and disc-halo transition; (2) To study the synchrotron emission as foreground noise of the CMB Polarization, especially for the weak B-Mode which carries the signature of the primordial gravitational wave background left by the Inflation. PGMS observations have been recently concluded. In this contribution we present the survey along with first results.
  • We present results of polarization observations at 1.4 GHz of the two fields imaged by the DASI experiment ($\alpha = 23^{\rm h} 30^{\rm m}$, $\delta = -55^{\circ}$ and $\alpha = 00^{\rm h} 30^{\rm m}$, $\delta = -55^{\circ}$, respectively). Data were taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array with 3.4 arcmin resolution and $\sim 0.18$ mJy beam$^{-1}$ sensitivity. The emission is dominated by point sources and we do not find evidence for diffuse synchrotron radiation even after source subtraction. This allows to estimate an upper limit of the diffuse polarized emission. The extrapolation to 30 GHz suggests that the synchrotron radiation is lower than the polarized signal measured by the DASI experiment by at least 2 orders of magnitude. This further supports the conclusions drawn by the DASI team itself about the negligible Galactic foreground contamination in their data set, improving by a factor $\sim 5$ the upper limit estimated by Leitch et al. (2005). The dominant point source emission allows us to estimate the contamination of the CMB by extragalactic foregrounds. We computed the power spectrum of their contribution and its extrapolation to 30 GHz provides a framework where the CMB signal should dominate. However, our results do not match the conclusions of the DASI team about the negligibility of point source contamination, suggesting to take into account a source subtraction from the DASI data.
  • Polarized diffuse emission observations at 1.4-GHz in a high Galactic latitude area of the northern Celestial hemisphere are presented. The 3.2 X 3.2 deg^2 field, centred at RA = 10h 58m, Dec = +42deg 18' (B1950), has Galactic coordinates l~172deg, b~+63deg and is located in the region selected as northern target of the BaR-SPOrt experiment. Observations have been performed with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. We find that the angular power spectra of the E- and B-modes have slopes of beta_E = -1.79 +/- 0.13 and beta_B = -1.74 +/- 0.12, respectively. Because of the very high Galactic latitude and the smooth emission, a weak Faraday rotation action is expected, which allows both a fair extrapolation to Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) frequencies and an estimate of the contamination by Galactic synchrotron emission. We extrapolate the E-mode spectrum up to 32-GHz and confirm the possibility to safely detect the CMBP E-mode signal in the Ka band found in another low emission region (Carretti et al. 2005b). Extrapolated up to 90-GHz, the Galactic synchrotron B-mode looks to compete with the cosmic signal only for models with a tensor-to-scalar perturbation power ratio T/S < 0.001, which is even lower than the T/S value of 0.01 found to be accessible in the only other high Galactic latitude area investigated to date. This suggests that values as low as T/S = 0.01 might be accessed at high Galactic latitudes. Such low emission values can allow a significant red-shift of the best frequency to detect the CMBP B-mode, also reducing the contamination by Galactic dust, and opening interesting perspectives to investigate Inflation models.
  • Polarized diffuse emission observations at 2.3 GHz in a high Galactic latitude area are presented. The 2\degr X 2\degr field, centred in (\alpha=5^h,\delta=-49\degr), is located in the region observed by the BOOMERanG experiment. Our observations has been carried out with the Parkes Radio telescope and represent the highest frequency detection done to date in low emission areas. Because of a weaker Faraday rotation action, the high frequency allows an estimate of the Galactic synchrotron contamination of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) that is more reliable than that done at 1.4 GHz. We find that the angular power spectra of the E- and B-modes have slopes of \beta_E = -1.46 +/- 0.14 and \beta_B = -1.87 +/- 0.22, indicating a flattening with respect to 1.4 GHz. Extrapolated up to 32 GHz, the E-mode spectrum is about 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of the CMBP, allowing a clean detection even at this frequency. The best improvement concerns the B-mode, for which our single-dish observations provide the first estimate of the contamination on angular scales close to the CMBP peak (about 2 degrees). We find that the CMBP B-mode should be stronger than synchrotron contamination at 90 GHz for models with T/S > 0.01. This low level could move down to 60-70 GHz the optimal window for CMBP measures.
  • We analyse the polarized emission at 1.4 GHz in a 3x3 deg^2 area at high Galactic latitude (b ~ -40deg). The region, centred in (RA=5h, Dec=-49deg), was observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array radio-interferometer, whose 3-30 arcmin angular sensitivity range allows the study of scales appropriate for CMB Polarization (CMBP) investigations. The angular behavior of the diffuse emission is analysed through the E- and B-mode power spectra. These follow a power law $C^X_l \propto l^{\beta_X}$ with slopes \beta_E = -1.97 \pm 0.08 and \beta_B = -1.98 \pm 0.07. The emission is found to be about a factor 25 fainter than in Galactic plane regions. The comparison of the power spectra with other surveys indicates that this area is intermediate between strong and negligible Faraday rotation effects. A similar conclusion can be reached by analysing both the frequency and Galactic latitude behaviors of the diffuse Galactic emission of the 408-1411 MHz Leiden survey data. We present an analysis of the Faraday rotation effects on the polarized power spectra, and find that the observed power spectra can be enhanced by a transfer of power from large to small angular scales. The extrapolation of the spectra to 32 and 90GHz of the CMB window suggests that Galactic synchrotron emission leaves the CMBP E-mode uncontaminated at 32GHz. The level of the contamination at 90GHz is expected to be more than 4 orders of magnitude below the CMBP spectrum. Extrapolating to the relevant angular scales, this region also appears adequate for investigation of the CMBP B-modes for models with tensor/scalar fluctuation power ratio T/S>0.01. We also identify polarized point sources in the field, providing a 9 object list which is complete down to the polarized flux limit of S^p_lim = 2 mJy.
  • We build template maps for the polarized Galactic--synchrotron emission on large angular scales (FWHM =~7$^\circ$), in the 20-90 GHz microwave range, by using WMAP data. The method, presented in a recent work, requires a synchrotron total intensity survey and the {\it polarization horizon} to model the polarized intensity and a starlight polarization map to model polarization angles. The basic template is obtained directly at 23 GHz with about 94% sky--coverage by using the synchrotron map released by the WMAP team. Extrapolations to 32, 60 and 90 GHz are performed by computing a synchrotron spectral index map, which strongly reduces previous uncertainties in passing from low (1.4 GHz) to microwave frequencies. Differing from low frequency data, none of our templates presents relevant structures out of the Galactic Plane. Our map at 90 GHz suggests that the synchrotron emission at high Galactic latitudes is low enough to allow a robust detection of the $E$--mode component of the cosmological signal on large--scale, even in models with low--reionization ($\tau = 0.05$). Detection of the weaker $B$--mode on the largest scales ($\ell < 10$) might be jeopardized unless the value $\tau = 0.17$ found by WMAP is confirmed, and $T/S > 0.1$. For lower levels of the gravitational--wave background the $B$--mode seems to be accessible only at the $\ell \sim 100$ peak and in selected low--synchrotron emission areas.