• One-opposition near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are growing in number, and they must be recovered to prevent loss and mismatch risk, and to improve their orbits, as they are likely to be too faint for detection in shallow surveys at future apparitions. We aimed to recover more than half of the one-opposition NEAs recommended for observations by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) using the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) in soft-override mode and some fractions of available D-nights. During about 130 hours in total between 2013 and 2016, we targeted 368 NEAs, among which 56 potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), observing 437 INT Wide Field Camera (WFC) fields and recovering 280 NEAs (76% of all targets). Engaging a core team of about ten students and amateurs, we used the THELI, Astrometrica, and the Find_Orb software to identify all moving objects using the blink and track-and-stack method for the faintest targets and plotting the positional uncertainty ellipse from NEODyS. Most targets and recovered objects had apparent magnitudes centered around V~22.8 mag, with some becoming as faint as V~24 mag. One hundred and three objects (representing 28% of all targets) were recovered by EURONEAR alone by Aug 2017. Orbital arcs were prolonged typically from a few weeks to a few years; our oldest recoveries reach 16 years. The O-C residuals for our 1,854 NEA astrometric positions show that most measurements cluster closely around the origin. In addition to the recovered NEAs, 22,000 positions of about 3,500 known minor planets and another 10,000 observations of about 1,500 unknown objects (mostly main-belt objects) were promptly reported to the MPC by our team. Four new NEAs were discovered serendipitously in the analyzed fields, increasing the counting to nine NEAs discovered by the EURONEAR in 2014 and 2015.
  • We present DOHA, a new algorithm for cotrending photometric light curves obtained by transiting exoplanet surveys. The algorithm employs a novel approach to the traditional "differential photometry" technique, by selecting the most suitable comparison star for each target light curve, using a two-step correlation search. Extensive tests on real data reveal that DOHA corrects both intra-night variations and long-term systematics affecting the data. Statistical studies conducted on a sample of 9500 light curves from the Qatar Exoplanet Survey reveal that DOHA-corrected light curves show an RMS improvement of a factor of 2, compared to the raw light curves. In addition, we show that the transit detection probability in our sample can increase considerably, even up to a factor of 7, after applying DOHA.
  • We present the first results of a dedicated search for pulsating white dwarfs (WDs) in detached white dwarf plus main-sequence binaries. Candidate systems were selected from a catalogue of WD+MS binaries, based on the surface gravities and effective temperatures of the WDs. We observed a total of 26 systems using ULTRACAM mounted on ESO's 3.5m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at La Silla. Our photometric observations reveal pulsations in seven WDs of our sample, including the first pulsating white dwarf with a main-sequence companion in a post common envelope binary, SDSSJ1136+0409. Asteroseismology of these new pulsating systems will provide crucial insight into how binary interactions, particularly the common envelope phase, affect the internal structure and evolution of WDs. In addition, our observations have revealed the partially eclipsing nature of one of our targets, SDSSJ1223-0056.
  • The INT/WFC Photometric H-Alpha Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS) is a 1800 square degrees imaging survey covering Galactic latitudes |b| < 5 deg and longitudes l = 30 to 215 deg in the r, i and H-alpha filters using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the 2.5-metre Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) in La Palma. We present the first quality-controlled and globally-calibrated source catalogue derived from the survey, providing single-epoch photometry for 219 million unique sources across 92% of the footprint. The observations were carried out between 2003 and 2012 at a median seeing of 1.1 arcsec (sampled at 0.33 arcsec/pixel) and to a mean 5\sigma-depth of 21.2 (r), 20.0 (i) and 20.3 (H-alpha) in the Vega magnitude system. We explain the data reduction and quality control procedures, describe and test the global re-calibration, and detail the construction of the new catalogue. We show that the new calibration is accurate to 0.03 mag (rms) and recommend a series of quality criteria to select the most reliable data from the catalogue. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of the catalogue's unique (r-Halpha, r-i) diagram to (1) characterise stellar populations and extinction regimes towards different Galactic sightlines and (2) select H-alpha emission-line objects. IPHAS is the first survey to offer comprehensive CCD photometry of point sources across the Galactic Plane at visible wavelengths, providing the much-needed counterpart to recent infrared surveys.
  • Context. Cygnus A, as the nearest powerful FR II radio galaxy, plays an important role in understanding jets and their impact on the surrounding intracluster medium. Aims. To explain why the nucleus is observed superposed onto the eastern lobe rather than in between the two lobes, and why the jet and counterjet are non-colinear. Methods. We made a comparative study of the radio images at different frequencies of Cygnus A, in combination with the published results on the radial velocities in the Cygnus A cluster. Results. From the morphology of the inner lobes we conclude that the lobes are not interacting with one another, but are well separated, even at low radio frequencies. We explain the location of the nucleus as the result of the proper motion of the galaxy through the cluster. The required proper motion is of the same order of magnitude as the radial velocity offset of Cygnus A with the sub-cluster it belongs to. The proper motion of the galaxy through the cluster likely also explains the non-co-linearity of the jet and counterjet.
  • We analyse the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey light curves of 835 spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf plus main-sequence binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with g<19, in search of new eclipsing systems. We identify 29 eclipsing systems, 12 of which were previously unknown. This brings the total number of eclipsing white dwarf plus main-sequence binaries to 49. Our set of new eclipsing systems contains two with periods of 1.9 and 2.3 days making them the longest period eclipsing white dwarf binaries known. We also identify one system which shows very large ellipsoidal modulation (almost 0.3 magnitudes), implying that the system is both very close to Roche-lobe overflow and at high inclination. However, our follow up photometry failed to firmly detect an eclipse meaning that this system either contains a cool white dwarf and hence the eclipse is very shallow and undetectable in our red-sensitive photometry or that it is non-eclipsing. Radial velocity measurements for the main-sequence stars in three of our newly identified eclipsing systems imply that their white dwarf masses are lower than those inferred from modelling their SDSS spectra. 13 non-eclipsing post common envelope binaries were also identified, from either reflection or ellipsoidal modulation effects. The white dwarfs in our newly discovered eclipsing systems span a wide range of parameters, including; low mass (~0.3Msol), very hot (80,000K) and a DC white dwarf. The spectral types of the main-sequence stars range from M2 to M6. This makes our sample ideal for testing white dwarf and low-mass star mass-radius relationships as well as close binary evolution.
  • We present a method to select hot subdwarf stars with A to M-type companions using photometric selection criteria. We cover a wide range in wavelength by combining GALEX ultraviolet data, optical photometry from the SDSS and the Carlsberg Meridian telescope, near-infrared data from 2MASS and UKIDSS. We construct two complimentary samples, one by matching GALEX, CMC and 2MASS, as well as a smaller, but deeper, sample using GALEX, SDSS and UKIDSS. In both cases, a large number of composite subdwarf plus main-sequence star candidates were found. We fit their spectral energy distributions with a composite model in order to estimate the subdwarf and companion star effective temperatures along with the distance to each system. The distribution of subdwarf effective temperature was found to primarily lie in the 20,000 - 30,000 K regime, but we also find cooler subdwarf candidates, making up ~5-10 per cent. The most prevalent companion spectral types were seen to be main-sequence stars between F0 and K0, while subdwarfs with M-type companions appear much rarer. This is clear observational confirmation that a very efficient first stable Roche-lobe overflow channel appears to produce a large number of subdwarfs with F to K-type companions. Our samples thus support the importance of binary evolution for subdwarf formation.
  • Virtually all close compact binary stars are formed through common-envelope (CE) evolution. It is generally accepted that during this crucial evolutionary phase a fraction of the orbital energy is used to expel the envelope. However, it is unclear whether additional sources of energy, such as the recombination energy of the envelope, play an important role. Here we report the discovery of the second and third longest orbital period post-common envelope binaries (PCEBs) containing white dwarf (WD) primaries, i.e. SDSSJ121130.94-024954.4 (Porb = 7.818 +- 0.002 days) and SDSSJ222108.45+002927.7 (Porb = 9.588 +- 0.002 days), reconstruct their evolutionary history, and discuss the implications for the energy budget of CE evolution. We find that, despite their long orbital periods, the evolution of both systems can still be understood without incorporating recombination energy, although at least small contributions of this additional energy seem to be likely. If recombination energy significantly contributes to the ejection of the envelope, more PCEBs with relatively long orbital periods (Porb >~ 1-3 day) harboring massive WDs (Mwd >~ 0.8 Msun) should exist.
  • We present a light curve analysis and radial velocity study of KOI-74, an eclipsing A star + white dwarf binary with a 5.2 day orbit. Aside from new spectroscopy covering the orbit of the system, we used 212 days of publicly available Kepler observations and present the first complete light curve fitting to these data, modelling the eclipses and transits, ellipsoidal modulation, reflection, and Doppler beaming. Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations are used to determine the system parameters and uncertainty estimates. Our results are in agreement with earlier studies, except that we find an inclination of 87.0 \pm 0.4\degree, which is significantly lower than the previously published value. We find that the mass ratio derived from the radial velocity amplitude (q=0.104 \pm 0.004) disagrees with that derived from the ellipsoidal modulation (q=0.052 \pm 0.004} assuming corotation). This was found before, but with our smaller inclination, the discrepancy is even larger than previously reported. Accounting for the rapid rotation of the A-star is found to increase the discrepancy even further by lowering the mass ratio to q=0.047 \pm 0.004. These results indicate that one has to be extremely careful in using the amplitude of an ellipsoidal modulation signal in a close binary to determine the mass ratio, when a proof of corotation is not firmly established. The radial velocities that can be inferred from the detected Doppler beaming in the light curve are found to be in agreement with our spectroscopic radial velocity determination. We also report the first measurement of R{\o}mer delay in a light curve of a compact binary. This delay amounts to -56 \pm 17 s and is consistent with the mass ratio derived from the radial velocity amplitude. The firm establishment of this mass ratio at q=0.104 \pm 0.004 leaves little doubt that the companion of KOI-74 is a low mass white dwarf.
  • We identify HS 2325+8205 as an eclipsing, frequently outbursting dwarf nova with an orbital period of 279.841731(5) min. Spectroscopic observations are used to derive the radial velocity curve of the secondary star from absorption features and also from the H-alpha emission lines, originating from the accretion disc, yielding K_secondary = K_abs = 237 +- 28 km/s and K_emn = 145 +- 9 km/s respectively. The distance to the system is calculated to be 400 (+200, -140) pc. A photometric monitoring campaign reveals an outburst recurrence time of 12-14 d, The combination of magnitude range (17-14 mag), high declination, eclipsing nature and frequency of outbursts makes HS 2325+8205 the ideal system for "real-time" studies of the accretion disc evolution and behavior in dwarf nova outbursts.
  • We use a combination of X-shooter spectroscopy, ULTRACAM high-speed photometry and SOFI near-infrared photometry to measure the masses and radii of both components of the eclipsing post common envelope binaries SDSS J1212-0123 and GK Vir. For both systems we measure the gravitational redshift of the white dwarf and combine it with light curve model fits to determine the inclinations, masses and radii. For SDSS J1212-0123 we find a white dwarf mass and radius of 0.439 +/- 0.002 Msun and 0.0168 +/- 0.0003 Rsun, and a secondary star mass and radius of 0.273 +/- 0.002 Msun and 0.306 +/- 0.007 Rsun. For GK Vir we find a white dwarf mass and radius of 0.564 +/- 0.014 Msun and 0.0170 +/- 0.0004 Rsun, and a secondary star mass and radius of 0.116 +/- 0.003 Msun and 0.155 +/- 0.003 Rsun. The mass and radius of the white dwarf in GK Vir are consistent with evolutionary models for a 50,000K carbon-oxygen core white dwarf. Although the mass and radius of the white dwarf in SDSS J1212-0123 are consistent with carbon-oxygen core models, evolutionary models imply that a white dwarf with such a low mass and in a short period binary must have a helium core. The mass and radius measurements are consistent with helium core models but only if the white dwarf has a very thin hydrogen envelope, which has not been predicted by evolutionary models. The mass and radius of the secondary star in GK Vir are consistent with evolutionary models after correcting for the effects of irradiation by the white dwarf. The secondary star in SDSS J1212-0123 has a radius ~9 per cent larger than predicted.
  • Post-common-envelope binaries (PCEBs) consisting of a white dwarf (WD) and a main-sequence secondary star are ideal systems to constrain models of common-envelope (CE) evolution. Until very recently, observed samples of PCEBs have been too small to fully explore this potential, however the recently identified large and relatively homogenous sample of PCEBs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has significantly changed this situation. We here analyze the orbital period distributions of PCEBs containing He- and C/O-core WDs separately and investigate whether the orbital period of PCEBs is related to the masses of their stellar components. We performed standard statistical tests to compare the orbital period distributions and to determine the confidence levels of possible relations. The orbital periods of PCEBs containing He-core WDs are significantly shorter than those of PCEBs containing C/O-core WDs. While the He-core PCEB orbital period distribution has a median value of Porb ~ 0.28 d, the median orbital period for PCEBs containing C/O-core WDs is Porb ~ 0.57 d. We also find that systems containing more massive secondaries have longer post-CE orbital periods, in contradiction to recent predictions. Our observational results provide new constraints on theories of CE evolution. However we suggest future binary population models to take selection effects into account that still affect the current observed PCEB sample.
  • The complexity of the common envelope phase and of magnetic stellar wind braking currently limits our understanding of close binary evolution. Because of their intrinsically simple structure, observational population studies of white dwarf plus main sequence (WDMS) binaries hold the potential to test theoretical models and constrain their parameters. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has provided a large and homogeneously selected sample of WDMS binaries, which we are characterising in terms of orbital and stellar parameters. We have obtained radial velocity information for 385 WDMS binaries from follow-up spectroscopy, and for an additional 861 systems from the SDSS sub-spectra. Radial velocity variations identify 191 of these WDMS binaries as post common envelope binaries (PCEBs). Orbital periods of 58 PCEBs were subsequently measured, predominantly from time-resolved spectroscopy, bringing the total number of SDSS PCEBs with orbital parameters to 79. Observational biases inherent to this PCEB sample were evaluated through extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We find that 21-24% of all SDSS WDMS binaries have undergone common envelope evolution, which is in good agreement with published binary population models and high-resolution HST imaging of WDMS binaries unresolved from the ground. The bias corrected orbital period distribution of PCEBs ranges from 1.9 h to 4.3 d and follows approximately a normal distribution in log(Porb), peaking at ~10.3 h. There is no observational evidence for a significant population of PCEBs with periods in the range of days to weeks. The large and homogeneous sample of SDSS WDMS binaries provides the means to test fundamental predictions of binary population models, and hence to observationally constrain the evolution of all close compact binaries.
  • We identify SDSSJ121010.1+334722.9 as an eclipsing post-common-envelope binary, with an orbital period of P ~ 3 hrs, containing a very cool, low-mass, DAZ white dwarf and a low-mass main-sequence star of spectral type M5. A model atmosphere analysis of the metal absorption lines detected in the blue part of the optical spectrum, along with the GALEX near-ultraviolet flux, yields a white dwarf temperature of 6000 +/- 200 K and a metallicity value of log(Z/H)= -2.0 +/- 0.3. The sodium absorption doublet is used to measure the radial velocity of the secondary star, K2 ~ 252 km/s and iron absorption lines in the blue part of the spectrum provide the radial velocity of the white dwarf, K1 ~ 95 km/s, yielding a mass ratio of q ~ 0.38. Light curve model fitting, using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, gives the inclination angle as i = (79.05 - 79.36) +/- 0.15 degrees, and the stellar masses as M1 = 0.415 +/- 0.010 solar-masses and M2 = 0.158 +/- 0.006 solar-masses. Systematic uncertainties in the absolute calibration of the photometric data influence the determination of the stellar radii. The radius of the white dwarf is found to be R1 = (0.0157 - 0.0161) +/- 0.0003 solar-radii and the volume-averaged radius of the tidally distorted secondary is R2 = (0.197 - 0.203) +/- 0.003 solar-radii. The white dwarf in J1210+3347 is a very strong He-core candidate.
  • We present high-speed ULTRACAM and SOFI photometry and X-shooter spectroscopy of the recently discovered 94 minute orbital period eclipsing white dwarf / main-sequence binary SDSS J085746.18+034255.3 (CSS 03170) and use these observations to measure the system parameters. We detect a shallow secondary eclipse and hence are able to determine an orbital inclination of 85.5 +/- 0.2 deg. The white dwarf has a mass of 0.51 +/- 0.05 Msun and a radius of 0.0247 +/- 0.0008 Rsun. With a temperature of 35,300 +/- 400K the white dwarf is highly over-inflated if it has a carbon-oxygen core, however if it has a helium core then its mass and radius are consistent with evolutionary models. Therefore, the white dwarf in SDSS J085746.18+034255.3 is most likely a helium core white dwarf with a mass close to the upper limit expected from evolution. The main-sequence star is an M8 dwarf with a mass of 0.09 +/- 0.01 Msun and a radius of 0.110 +/- 0.004 Rsun placing it close to the hydrogen burning limit. The system emerged from a common envelope ~20 million years ago and will reach a semi-detached configuration in ~400 million years, becoming a cataclysmic variable with a period of 66 minutes, below the period minimum.
  • Close binarity can play a significant role in the shaping of planetary nebulae (PNe) as the system evolves through the common-envelope phase. We present the detection of two of the shortest orbital periods among PN binary central stars. These are Hen 2-428, a bipolar PN, and V458 Vul, a recent nova surrounded by a mildly bipolar planetary nebula. The properties of the central stars of these systems, of their nebulae and their possible fate are discussed.
  • We present time-resolved optical spectroscopy of V458 Vulpeculae (Nova Vul 2007 No. 1) spread over a period of 15 months starting 301 days after its discovery. Our data reveal radial velocity variations in the HeII {\lambda}5412 and HeII {\lambda}4686 emission lines. A period analysis of the radial velocity curves resulted in a period of 98.09647 \pm 0.00025 min (0.06812255 \pm 0.00000017 d) which we identify with the orbital period of the binary system. V458 Vul is therefore the planetary nebula central binary star with the shortest period known. We explore the possibility of the system being composed of a relatively massive white dwarf (M1 \gsim 1.0 Msun) accreting matter from a post-asymptotic giant branch star which produced the planetary nebula observed. In this scenario, the central binary system therefore underwent two common-envelope episodes. A combination of previous photoionisation modelling of the nebular spectra, post-asymptotic giant branch evolutionary tracks and the orbital period favour a mass of M2 \sim 0.6 Msun for the donor star. Therefore, the total mass of the system may exceed the Chandrasekhar mass, which makes V458 Vul a Type Ia supernova progenitor candidate.
  • The UV-Excess Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane images a 10x185 degree wide band, centered on the Galactic Equator using the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope in four bands (U,g,r,HeI5875) down to ~21st-22nd magnitude (~20th in HeI5875). The setup and data reduction procedures are described. Simulations of the colours of main-sequence stars, giant, supergiants, DA and DB white dwarfs and AM CVn stars are made, including the effects of reddening. A first look at the data of the survey (currently 30% complete) is given.
  • From optical photometry we show that SDSSJ121258.25-012310.1 is a new eclipsing, post common-envelope binary with an orbital period of 8.06 hours and an eclipse length of 23 minutes. We observed the object over 11 nights in different bands and determined the ephemeris of the eclipse to HJD_mid = 2454104. 7086(2) + 0.3358706(5) x E, where numbers in parenthesis indicate the uncertainties in the last digit. The depth of the eclipse is 2.85 +/- 0.17 mag in the V band, 1.82 +/- 0.08 mag in the R band and 0.52 +/- 0.02 mag in the I band. From spectroscopic observations we measured the semi-amplitude of the radial velocity K_2 = 181 +/- 3 km/s for the secondary star. The stellar and binary parameters of the system were constrained from a) fitting the SDSS composite spectrum of the binary, b) using a K-band luminosty-mass relation for the secondary star, and c) from detailed analyses of the eclipse light curve. The white dwarf has an effective temperature of 17700 +/- 300 K, and its surface gravity is logg =7.53 +/- 0.2. We estimate that the spectral type of the red dwarf is M4 +/- 1 and the distance to the system is 230 +/- 20 parsec. The mass of the secondary star is estimated to be in the range Msec = 0.26-0.29 Msun, while the mass of the white dwarf is most likely Mwd = 0.46-0.48 Msun. From an empirical mass-radius relation we estimate the radius of the red dwarf to be in the range 0.28-0.31 Rsun, whereas we get Rwd = 0.016-0.018 Rsun from a theoretical mass-radius realation. Finally we discuss the spectral energy distribution and the likely evolutionary state of SDSS1212-0123.
  • We identify SDSS011009.09+132616.1, SDSS030308.35+005444.1, SDSS143547.87+373338.5 and SDSS154846.00+405728.8 as four eclipsing white dwarf plus main sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and report on follow-up observations of these systems. Orbital periods and ephemerides have been established from multi-season photometry. SDSS1435+3733, with Porb=3h has the shortest orbital period of all known eclipsing WDMS binaries. Time-resolved spectroscopic observations have been obtained and the radial velocities of the secondary stars in all four systems were measured. A spectral decomposition/fitting technique was then employed to determine the white dwarf effective temperatures and surface gravities, as well as the spectral types of the companion stars. We used a light curve modeling code to further constrain the masses and radii of the components in all systems. All three DA white dwarfs have masses of Mwd~0.4-0.6Msun, in line with the expectations from close binary evolution. The DC white dwarf in SDSS0303+0054 has a mass of Mwd>0.85Msun, making it unusually massive for a post-common envelope system. Our new additions raise the number of known eclipsing WDMS binaries to fourteen, and we find that the average white dwarf mass in this sample is <Mwd>=0.57+/-0.16Msun, only slightly lower than the average mass of single white dwarfs. The majority of all eclipsing WDMS binaries contain low-mass (<0.6Msun) secondary stars, and will eventually provide valuable observational input for the calibration of the mass-radius relations of low-mass main sequence stars and of white dwarfs.
  • The INT/WFC Photometric H-alpha Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS) is an imaging survey being carried out in H-alpha, r' and i' filters, with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the 2.5-metre Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) to a depth of r'=20 (10 sigma). The survey is aimed at revealing large scale structure in our local galaxy, and also the properties of key early and late populations making up the Milky Way. Mapping emission line objects enables a particular focus on objects in the young and old stages of stellar evolution ranging from early T-Tauri stars to late planetary nebulae. In this paper we present the IPHAS Initial Data Release, primarily a photometric catalogue of about 200 million unique objects, coupled with associated image data covering about 1600 square degrees in three passbands. We note how access to the primary data products has been implemented through use of standard virtual observatory publishing interfaces. Simple traditional web access is provided to the main IPHAS photometric catalogue, in addition to a number of common catalogues (such as 2MASS) which are of immediate relevance. Access through the AstroGrid VO Desktop opens up the full range of analysis options, and allows full integration with the wider range of data and services available through the Virtual Observatory. The IDR represents the largest dataset published primarily through VO interfaces to date, and so stands as an examplar of the future of survey data mining. Examples of data access are given, including a cross-matching of IPHAS photometry with sources in the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey that validates the existing calibration of the best data.
  • We report the first results from a new search for cataclysmic variables (CVs) using a combined X-ray (ROSAT) / infrared (2MASS) target selection that discriminates against background AGN. Identification spectra were obtained at the Isaac Newton Telescope for a total of 174 targets, leading to the discovery of 12 new CVs. Initially devised to find short-period low-mass-transfer CVs, this selection scheme has been very successful in identifying new intermediate polars. Photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations identify four of the new CVs as intermediate polars: 1RXSJ063631.9+353537 (Porb~201min, Pspin=1008.3408s or 930.5829), 1RXSJ070407.9+262501 (Porb~250min, Pspin=480.708s), 1RXSJ173021.5-055933 (Porb=925.27min, Pspin=128.0s), and 1RXSJ180340.0+401214 (Porb=160.21min, Pspin=1520.51s). RXJ1730, also a moderately bright hard X-ray source in the INTEGRAL/IBIS Galactic plane survey, resembles the enigmatic AE Aqr. It is likely that its white dwarf is not rotating at the spin equilibrium period, and the system may represent a short-lived phase in CV evolution.