• We present a semi-empirical, largely model-independent approach for estimating Galactic birth radii, r_birth, for Milky Way disk stars. The technique relies on the justifiable assumption that a negative radial metallicity gradient in the interstellar medium (ISM) existed for most of the disk lifetime. Stars are projected back to their birth positions according to the observationally derived age and [Fe/H] with no kinematical information required. Applying our approach to the AMBRE:HARPS and HARPS-GTO local samples, we show that we can constrain the ISM metallicity evolution with Galactic radius and cosmic time, [Fe/H]_ISM(r, t), by requiring a physically meaningful r_birth distribution. We find that the data are consistent with an ISM radial metallicity gradient that flattens with time from ~-0.15 dex/kpc at the beginning of disk formation, to its measured present-day value (-0.07 dex/kpc). We present several chemo-kinematical relations in terms of mono-r_birth populations. One remarkable result is that the kinematically hottest stars would have been born locally or in the outer disk, consistent with thick disk formation from the nested flares of mono-age populations and predictions from cosmological simulations. This phenomenon can be also seen in the observed age-velocity dispersion relation, in that its upper boundary is dominated by stars born at larger radii. We also find that the flatness of the local age-metallicity relation (AMR) is the result of the superposition of the AMRs of mono-r_birth populations, each with a well-defined negative slope. The solar birth radius is estimated to be 7.3+-0.6 kpc, for a current Galactocentric radius of 8 kpc.
  • We present elemental abundance analysis of high-resolution spectra for five giant stars, deriving Fe, Mg, Al, C, N, O, Si and Ce abundances, and spatially located within the innermost regions of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6522, based on H-band spectra taken with the multi-object APOGEEnorth spectrograph from the SDSS-IV Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey. Of the five cluster candidates, four stars are confirmed to have second-generation (SG) abundance patterns, with the basic pattern of depletion in C and Mg simultaneous with enrichment in N and Al as seen in other SG globular cluster populations at similar metallicity. In agreement with the most recent optical studies, the NGC 6522 stars analyzed exhibit (when available) only mild overabundances of the s-process element Ce, contradicting the idea of the NGC 6522 stars being formed from gas enriched by spinstars and indicating that other stellar sources such as massive AGB stars could be the primary intra-cluster medium polluters. The peculiar abundance signature of SG stars have been observed in our data, confirming the presence of multiple generations of stars in NGC 6522.
  • APOGEE-2 is a high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopic survey observing roughly 300,000 stars across the entire sky. It is the successor to APOGEE and is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). APOGEE-2 is expanding upon APOGEE's goals of addressing critical questions of stellar astrophysics, stellar populations, and Galactic chemodynamical evolution using (1) an enhanced set of target types and (2) a second spectrograph at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. APOGEE-2 is targeting red giant branch (RGB) and red clump (RC) stars, RR Lyrae, low-mass dwarf stars, young stellar objects, and numerous other Milky Way and Local Group sources across the entire sky from both hemispheres. In this paper, we describe the APOGEE-2 observational design, target selection catalogs and algorithms, and the targeting-related documentation included in the SDSS data releases.
  • We report the discovery of a stellar over-density 8$^{\circ}$ north of the center of the Small Magellanic Cloud (Small Magellanic Cloud Northern Over-Density; SMCNOD) using data from the first two years of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the first year of the MAGellanic SatelLITEs Survey (MagLiteS). The SMCNOD is indistinguishable in age, metallicity and distance from the nearby SMC stars, being primarly composed of intermediate-age stars (6 Gyr, Z=0.001), with a small fraction of young stars (1 Gyr, Z=0.01). The SMCNOD has an elongated shape with an ellipticity of 0.6 and a size of $\sim$ 6x2 deg. It has an absolute magnitude of $M_V \cong$ -7.7, $r_h = 2.1$ kpc, and $\mu_V(r<r_h)$ = 31.2 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. We estimate a stellar mass of $\sim 10^5$ $M_{\odot}$, following a Kroupa mass function. The SMCNOD was probably removed from the SMC disk by tidal stripping, since it is located near the head of the Magellanic Stream, and the literature indicates likely recent LMC-SMC encounters. This scenario is supported by the lack of significant HI gas. Other potential scenarios for the SMCNOD origin are a transient over-density within the SMC tidal radius or a primordial SMC satellite in advanced stage of disruption.
  • We report the peculiar chemical abundance patterns of eleven atypical Milky Way (MW) field red giant stars observed by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). These atypical giants exhibit strong Al and N enhancements accompanied by C and Mg depletions, strikingly similar to those observed in the so-called second-generation (SG) stars of globular clusters (GCs). Remarkably, we find low-Mg abundances ([Mg/Fe]$<$0.0) together with strong Al and N overabundances in the majority (5/7) of the metal-rich ([Fe/H]$\gtrsim - 1.0$) sample stars, which is at odds with actual observations of SG stars in Galactic CGs of similar metallicities. This chemical pattern is unique and unprecedented among MW stars, posing urgent questions about its origin. These atypical stars could be former SG stars of dissolved GCs formed with intrinsically lower abundances of Mg and enriched Al (subsequently self-polluted by massive AGB stars) or the result of exotic binary systems. We speculate that the stars Mg-deficiency as well as the orbital properties suggest that they could have an extragalactic origin. This discovery should guide future dedicated spectroscopic searches of atypical stellar chemical patterns in our Galaxy; a fundamental step forward to understand the Galactic formation and evolution.
  • We report the first detailed chemical abundance analysis of the exoplanet-hosting M-dwarf stars Kepler-138 and Kepler-186 from the analysis of high-resolution ($R$ $\sim$ 22,500) $H$-band spectra from the SDSS IV - APOGEE survey. Chemical abundances of thirteen elements - C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, and Fe - are extracted from the APOGEE spectra of these early M-dwarfs via spectrum syntheses computed with an improved line list that takes into account H$_{2}$O and FeH lines. This paper demonstrates that APOGEE spectra can be analyzed to determine detailed chemical compositions of M-dwarfs. Both exoplanet-hosting M-dwarfs display modest sub-solar metallicities: [Fe/H]$_{Kepler-138}$ = -0.09 $\pm$ 0.09 dex and [Fe/H]$_{Kepler-186}$ = -0.08 $\pm$ 0.10 dex. The measured metallicities resulting from this high-resolution analysis are found to be higher by $\sim$0.1-0.2 dex than previous estimates from lower-resolution spectra. The C/O ratios obtained for the two planet-hosting stars are near-solar, with values of 0.55 $\pm$ 0.10 for Kepler-138 and 0.52 $\pm$ 0.12 for Kepler-186. Kepler-186 exhibits a marginally enhanced [Si/Fe] ratio.
  • We report on detection, from observations obtained with the APOGEE spectroscopic survey, of a metal-poor ([Fe/H] $= -1.3$ dex) field giant star with an extreme Mg-Al abundance ratio ([Mg/Fe] $= -0.31$ dex; [Al/Fe] $= 1.49$ dex). Such low Mg/Al ratios are seen only among the second-generation population of globular clusters, and are not present among Galactic disk field stars. The light element abundances of this star, 2M16011638-1201525, suggest that it could have been born in a globular cluster. We explore several origin scenarios, in particular studying the orbit of the star to check the probability of it being kinematically related to known globular clusters. We performed simple orbital integrations assuming the estimated distance of 2M16011638-1201525 and the available six-dimensional phase-space coordinates of 63 globular clusters, looking for close encounters in the past with a minimum distance approach within the tidal radius of each cluster. We found a very low probability that 2M16011638-1201525 was ejected from most globular clusters; however, we note that the best progenitor candidate to host this star is globular cluster $\omega$ Centauri (NGC 5139). Our dynamical investigation demonstrates that 2M16011638-1201525 reaches a distance $|Z_{max}| < 3 $ kpc from the Galactic plane and a minimum and maximum approach to the Galactic center of $R_{min}<0.62$ kpc and $R_{max}<7.26$ kpc in an eccentric ($e\sim0.53$) and retrograde orbit. Since the extreme chemical anomaly of 2M16011638-1201525 has also been observed in halo field stars, this object could also be considered a halo contaminant, likely been ejected into the Milky Way disk from the halo. We conclude that, 2M16011638-20152 is also kinematically consistent with the disk but chemically consistent with halo field stars.
  • Much of the inner Milky Way's (MW) global rotation and velocity dispersion patterns can be reproduced by models of secularly-evolved, bar-dominated bulges. More sophisticated constraints, including the higher moments of the line-of-sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs) and limits on the chemodynamical substructure, are critical for interpreting observations of the unresolved inner regions of extragalactic systems and for placing the MW in context with other galaxies. Here, we use SDSS-APOGEE data to develop these constraints, by presenting the first maps of the LOSVD skewness and kurtosis of metal-rich and metal-poor inner MW stars (divided at [Fe/H] = -0.4), and comparing the observed patterns to those that are seen both in N-body models and in extragalactic bars. Despite closely matching the mean velocity and dispersion, the models do not reproduce the observed LOSVD skewness patterns in different ways, which demonstrates that our understanding of the detailed orbital structure of the inner MW remains an important regime for improvement. We find evidence in the MW of the skewness-velocity correlation that is used as a diagnostic of extragalactic bar/bulges. This correlation appears in metal-rich stars only, providing further evidence for different evolutionary histories of chemically differentiated populations. We connect these skewness measurements to previous work on high-velocity "peaks" in the inner Galaxy, confirming the presence of that phenomenon, and we quantify the cylindrical rotation of the inner Galaxy, finding that the latitude-independent rotation vanishes outside of lon ~ 7 deg. Finally, we evaluate the MW data in light of select extragalactic bar diagnostics and discuss progress and challenges of using the MW as a resolved analog of unresolved stellar populations.
  • With the advent of the space missions CoRoT and Kepler, it has become feasible to determine precise asteroseismic masses and ages for large samples of red-giant stars. In this paper, we present the CoRoGEE dataset -- obtained from CoRoT lightcurves for 606 red giant stars in two fields of the Galactic disc which have been co-observed for an ancillary project of APOGEE. We have used the Bayesian parameter estimation code PARAM to calculate distances, extinctions, masses, and ages for these stars in a homogeneous analysis, resulting in relative statistical uncertainties of $\sim2\%$ in distance, $\sim4\%$ in radius, $\sim9\%$ in mass and $\sim25\%$ in age. We also assess systematic age uncertainties due to different input physics and mass loss. We discuss the correlation between ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars over a large radial range of the Milky Way's disc (5 kpc $<R_{\rm Gal}<$ 14 kpc), focussing on the [$\alpha$/Fe]-[Fe/H]-age plane in five radial bins of the Galactic disc. We find an overall agreement with the expectations of chemical-evolution models computed before the present data were available, especially for the outer regions. However, our data also indicate that a significant fraction of stars now observed near and beyond the Solar Neighbourhood migrated from inner regions. Mock CoRoGEE observations of a chemo-dynamical Milky Way disc model show that the number of high-metallicity stars in the outer disc is too high to be accounted for even by the strong radial mixing present in the model. The mock observations also reveal that the age distribution of the [$\alpha$/Fe]-enhanced sequence in the CoRoGEE inner-disc field is much broader than expected from a combination of radial mixing and observational errors. We suggest that a thick disc/bulge component that formed stars for more than 3 Gyr may account for these discrepancies.
  • We examine the distribution of the [O/Fe] abundance ratio in stars across the Galactic disk using H-band spectra from the Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). We minimize systematic errors by considering groups of stars with similar atmospheric parameters. The APOGEE measurements in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 reveal that the square root of the star-to-star cosmic variance in the oxygen-to-iron ratio at a given metallicity is about 0.03-0.04 dex in both the thin and thick disk. This is about twice as high as the spread found for solar twins in the immediate solar neighborhood and the difference is probably associated to the wider range of galactocentric distances spanned by APOGEE stars. We quantify the uncertainties by examining the spread among stars with the same parameters in clusters; these errors are a function of effective temperature and metallicity, ranging between 0.005 dex at 4000 K and solar metallicity, to about 0.03 dex at 4500 K and [Fe/H]= -0.6. We argue that measuring the spread in [O/Fe] and other abundance ratios provides strong constraints for models of Galactic chemical evolution.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey--III (SDSS--III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has obtained high resolution (R $\sim$ 22,500), high signal-to-noise ratio ($>$ 100) spectra in the H$-$band ($\sim$1.5$-$1.7 $\mu$m) for about 146,000 stars in the Milky Way galaxy. We have computed spectral libraries with effective temperature ($T\rm{_{eff}}$) ranging from 3500 to 8000 K for the automated chemical analy\-sis of the survey data. The libraries, used to derive stellar parameters and abundances from the APOGEE spectra in the SDSS--III data release 12 (DR12), are based on ATLAS9 model atmospheres and the ASS$\epsilon$T spectral synthesis code. We present a second set of libraries based on MARCS model atmospheres and the spectral synthesis code Turbospectrum. The ATLAS9/ASS$\epsilon$T ($T\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$8000 K) and MARCS/Turbospectrum ($T\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$5500 K) grids cover a wide range of metallicity ($-$2.5 $\leq$ [M/H] $\leq$ $+$0.5 dex), surface gravity (0 $\leq$ log $g$ $\leq$ 5 dex), microturbulence (0.5 $\leq$ $\xi$ $\leq$ 8 km~s$^{-1}$), carbon ($-$1 $\leq$ [C/M] $\leq$ $+$1 dex), nitrogen ($-$1 $\leq$ [N/M] $\leq$ $+$1 dex), and $\alpha$-element ($-$1 $\leq$ [$\alpha$/M] $\leq$ $+$1 dex) variations, having thus seven dimensions. We compare the ATLAS9/ASS$\epsilon$T and MARCS/Turbospectrum libraries and apply both of them to the analysis of the observed H$-$band spectra of the Sun and the K2 giant Arcturus, as well as to a selected sample of well-known giant stars observed at very high-resolution. The new APOGEE libraries are publicly available and can be employed for chemical studies in the H$-$band using other high-resolution spectrographs.
  • We map the distribution and properties of the Milky Way's interstellar medium as traced by diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) detected in near-infrared stellar spectra from the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey. Focusing exclusively on the strongest DIB in the H-band, at ~1.527 microns, we present a projected map of the DIB absorption field in the Galactic plane, using a set of about 60,000 sightlines that reach up to 15 kpc from the Sun and probe up to 30 magnitudes of visual extinction. The strength of this DIB is linearly correlated with dust reddening over three orders of magnitude in both DIB equivalent width (W_DIB) and extinction, with a power law index of 1.01 +/- 0.01, a mean relationship of W_DIB/A_V = 0.1 Angstrom mag^-1, and a dispersion of ~0.05 Angstrom mag^-1 at extinctions characteristic of the Galactic midplane. These properties establish this DIB as a powerful, independent probe of dust extinction over a wide range of A_V values. The subset of about 14,000 robustly detected DIB features have an exponential W_DIB distribution. We empirically determine the intrinsic rest wavelength of this transition to be lambda_0 = 15,272.42 Angstrom, and then calculate absolute radial velocities of the carrier, which display the kinematical signature of the rotating Galactic disk. We probe the DIB carrier distribution in three dimensions and show that it can be characterized by an exponential disk model with a scaleheight of about 100 pc and a scalelength of about 5 kpc. Finally, we show that the DIB distribution also traces large-scale Galactic structures, including the central long bar and the warp of the outer disk.
  • We explore the Triangulum-Andromeda (TriAnd) overdensity in the SPLASH (Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo) and SEGUE (the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration) spectroscopic surveys. Milky Way main sequence turn-off stars in the SPLASH survey reveal that the TriAnd overdensity and the recently discovered PAndAS stream (Martin et al. 2014) share a common heliocentric distance (D ~ 20 kpc), position on the sky, and line-of-sight velocity (V_GSR ~ 50 km/s). Similarly, A-type, giant, and main sequence turn-off stars selected from the SEGUE survey in the vicinity of the Segue 2 satellite show that TriAnd is prevalent in these fields, with a velocity and distance similar to Segue 2. The coincidence of the PAndAS stream and Segue 2 satellite in positional and velocity space to TriAnd suggests that these substructures are all associated, and may be a fossil record of group-infall onto the Milky Way halo. In this scenario, the Segue 2 satellite and PAndAS stream are "satellites of satellites", and the large, metal-rich TriAnd overdensity is the remains of the group central.
  • We investigate the chemo-kinematic properties of the Milky Way disc by exploring the first year of data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and compare our results to smaller optical high-resolution samples in the literature, as well as results from lower resolution surveys such as GCS, SEGUE and RAVE. We start by selecting a high-quality sample in terms of chemistry ($\sim$ 20.000 stars) and, after computing distances and orbital parameters for this sample, we employ a number of useful subsets to formulate constraints on Galactic chemical and chemodynamical evolution processes in the Solar neighbourhood and beyond (e.g., metallicity distributions -- MDFs, [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams, and abundance gradients). Our red giant sample spans distances as large as 10 kpc from the Sun. We find remarkable agreement between the recently published local (d $<$ 100 pc) high-resolution high-S/N HARPS sample and our local HQ sample (d $<$ 1 kpc). The local MDF peaks slightly below solar metallicity, and exhibits an extended tail towards [Fe/H] $= -$1, whereas a sharper cut-off is seen at larger metallicities. The APOGEE data also confirm the existence of a gap in the [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] abundance diagram. When expanding our sample to cover three different Galactocentric distance bins, we find the high-[$\alpha$/Fe] stars to be rare towards the outer zones, as previously suggested in the literature. For the gradients in [Fe/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe], measured over a range of 6 $ < $ R $ <$ 11 kpc in Galactocentric distance, we find a good agreement with the gradients traced by the GCS and RAVE dwarf samples. For stars with 1.5 $<$ z $<$ 3 kpc, we find a positive metallicity gradient and a negative gradient in [$\alpha$/Fe].
  • The SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a three year survey that is collecting 100,000 high-resolution spectra in the near-IR across multiple Galactic populations. To derive stellar parameters and chemical compositions from this massive data set, the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) has been developed. Here, we describe empirical calibrations of stellar parameters presented in the first SDSS-III APOGEE data release (DR10). These calibrations were enabled by observations of 559 stars in 20 globular and open clusters. The cluster observations were supplemented by observations of stars in NASA's Kepler field that have well determined surface gravities from asteroseismic analysis. We discuss the accuracy and precision of the derived stellar parameters, considering especially effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity; we also briefly discuss the derived results for the abundances of the alpha-elements, carbon, and nitrogen. Overall, we find that ASPCAP achieves reasonably accurate results for temperature and metallicity, but suffers from systematic errors in surface gravity. We derive calibration relations that bring the raw ASPCAP results into better agreement with independently determined stellar parameters. The internal scatter of ASPCAP parameters within clusters suggests that, metallicities are measured with a precision better than 0.1 dex, effective temperatures better than 150 K, and surface gravities better than 0.2 dex. The understanding provided by the clusters and Kepler giants on the current accuracy and precision will be invaluable for future improvements of the pipeline.
  • The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of ~100,000 red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.
  • We report on the discovery of a new Milky Way companion stellar system located at (RA, Dec) = (22h10m43.15s, +14:56:58.8). The discovery was made using the eighth data release of SDSS after applying an automated method to search for overdensities in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey footprint. Follow-up observations were performed using CFHT-MegaCam, which reveal that this system is comprised of an old stellar population, located at a distance of 31.9+1.0-1.6 kpc, with a half-light radius of r_h = 7.24+1.94-1.29 pc and a concentration parameter of c = 1.55. A systematic isochrone fit to its color-magnitude diagram resulted in log(age) = 10.07+0.05-0.03 and [Fe/H] = -1.58+0.08-0.13 . These quantities are typical of globular clusters in the MW halo. The newly found object is of low stellar mass, whose observed excess relative to the background is caused by 96 +/- 3 stars. The direct integration of its background decontaminated luminosity function leads to an absolute magnitude of MV = -1.21 +/- 0.66. The resulting surface brightness is uV = 25.9 mag/arcsec2 . Its position in the M_V vs. r_h diagram lies close to AM4 and Koposov 1, which are identified as star clusters. The object is most likely a very faint star cluster - one of the faintest and lowest mass systems yet identified.
  • We present a new grid of model photospheres for the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey of stellar populations of the Galaxy, calculated using the ATLAS9 and MARCS codes. New opacity distribution functions were generated to calculate ATLAS9 model photospheres. MARCS models were calculated based on opacity sampling techniques. The metallicity ([M/H]) spans from -5 to 1.5 for ATLAS and -2.5 to 0.5 for MARCS models. There are three main differences with respect to previous ATLAS9 model grids: a new corrected H2O linelist, a wide range of carbon ([C/M]) and alpha element [alpha/M] variations, and solar reference abundances from Asplund et al. 2005. The added range of varying carbon and alpha element abundances also extends the previously calculated MARCS model grids. Altogether 1980 chemical compositions were used for the ATLAS9 grid, and 175 for the MARCS grid. Over 808 thousand ATLAS9 models were computed spanning temperatures from 3500K to 30000K and log g from 0 to 5, where larger temperatures only have high gravities. The MARCS models span from 3500K to 5500K, and log g from 0 to 5. All model atmospheres are publically available online.
  • Near-future surveys promise a dramatic improvement in the number and precision of astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic measurements of stars in the Milky Way's disk. We examine the impact of such surveys on our understanding of the Galaxy by "observing" particle realizations of non-axisymmetric disk distributions orbiting in an axisymmetric halo with appropriate errors and then attempting to recover the underlying potential using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. We demonstrate that the azimuthally averaged gravitational force field in the Galactic plane--and hence, to a lesser extent, the Galactic mass distribution--can be tightly constrained over a large range of radii using a variety of types of surveys so long as the error distribution of the measurements of the parallax, proper motion and radial velocity are well-understood and the disk is surveyed globally. One advantage of our method is that the target stars can be selected non-randomly in real or apparent-magnitude space to ensure just such a global sample without biasing the results. Assuming we can always measure the line-of-sight velocity of a star with at least 1 km/s precision, we demonstrate that the force field can be determined to better than ~1% for Galactocentric radii in the range R=4-20 kpc We conclude that near-future surveys, like SIM Lite, Gaia, and VERA, will provide the first precise mapping of the gravitational force field in the region of the Galactic disk.
  • APOGEE is a large-scale, NIR, high-resolution (R~20,000) spectroscopic survey of Galactic stars. It is one of the four experiments in SDSS-III. Because APOGEE will observe in the H band, it will be the first survey to pierce through Galactic dust and provide a vast, uniform database of chemical abundances and radial velocities for stars across all Galactic populations (bulge, disk, and halo). The survey will be conducted with a dedicated, 300-fiber, cryogenic, spectrograph that is being built at the University of Virginia, coupled to the ARC 2.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. APOGEE will use a significant fraction of the SDSS-III bright time during a three-year period to observe, at high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N>100), about 100,000 giant stars selected directly from 2MASS down to a typical flux limit of H<13. The main scientific objectives of APOGEE are: (1) measuring unbiased metallicity distributions and abundance patterns for the different Galactic stellar populations, (2) studying the processes of star formation, feedback, and chemical mixing in the Milky Way, (3) surveying the dynamics of the bulge and disk, placing constraints on the nature and influence of the Galactic bar and spiral arms, and (4) using extensive chemodynamical data, particularly in the inner Galaxy, to unravel its formation and evolution.
  • We present a wide-field (4.5 deg^2) photometric and spectroscopic survey of the Leo I dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy to explore its extended morphology and dynamics. As in previous papers in this series, we take advantage of photometry in the M, T_2, and DDO51 filter system to select LeoI red giant branch star candidates, and, so far, this selection technique has proven 100% reliable in selecting actual Leo I members among more than 100 M < 21.5 Leo I giant candidates having previous or new Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy to a radius >1.3 times the limiting radius of the fitted, central King profile. The two-dimensional distribution of all similarly-selected Leo I giant candidates is well fitted by a central single-component King profile of limiting radius 13.3 arcmin, but many giant stars are found outside this newly derived King limiting radius. The density profile thus shows a break at a major axis radial distance of ~10 arcmin produced by an excess of stars at and beyond the King limiting radius (spectroscopically confirmed to be made of true Leo I members), and primarily along the major axis of the main body of the rather elongated satellite. This spatial configuration, a rather flat velocity dispersion profile and an asymmetric radial velocity (RV) distribution among the Leo I members at large radii together support a picture where Leo I has been tidally disrupted on at least one, but at most two, perigalactic passages of a massive Local Group member. (abridged)
  • We present spectroscopic observations of red giant branch (RGB) stars over a large expanse in the halo of the Andromeda spiral galaxy (M31), acquired with the DEIMOS instrument on the Keck II 10-m telescope. Using a combination of five photometric/spectroscopic diagnostics -- (1) radial velocity, (2) intermediate-width DDO51 photometry, (3) Na I equivalent width (surface gravity sensitive), (4) position in the color-magnitude diagram, and (5) comparison between photometric and spectroscopic [Fe/H] estimates -- we isolate over 250 bona fide M31 bulge and halo RGB stars located in twelve fields ranging from R = 12-165kpc from the center of M31 (47 of these stars are halo members with R > 60 kpc). We derive the photometric and spectroscopic metallicity distribution function of M31 RGB stars in each of these fields. The mean of the resulting M31 spheroid (bulge and halo) metallicity distribution is found to be systematically more metal-poor with increasing radius, shifting from <[Fe/H]> = -0.47+/-0.03 (sigma = 0.39) at R < 20 kpc to <[Fe/H]> = -0.94+/-0.06 (sigma = 0.60) at R ~ 30 kpc to <[Fe/H]> = -1.26+/-0.10 (sigma = 0.72) at R > 60 kpc, assuming [alpha/Fe] = 0.0. These results indicate the presence of a metal-poor RGB population at large radial distances out to at least R = 160 kpc, thereby supporting our recent discovery of a stellar halo in M31: its halo and bulge (defined as the structural components with R^{-2} power law and de Vaucouleurs R^{1/4} law surface brightness profiles, respectively) are shown to have distinct metallicity distributions. If we assume an alpha-enhancement of [alpha/Fe] = +0.3 for M31's halo, we derive <[Fe/H]> = -1.5+/-0.1 (sigma = 0.7). Therefore, the mean metallicity and metallicity spread of this newly found remote M31 RGB population are similar to those of the Milky Way halo.
  • The question of the existence of active tidal disruption around various dSph galaxies remains controversial. That debate often centers on the nature (bound vs. unbound) of extended populations of stars. However, the more fundamental issue of the very existence of the extended populations is still contentious. We present an evaluation of the debate centering on one particular dSph, Carina, for which claims both for and against the existence of stars beyond the King radius have been made. Our review includes an examination of all previous studies bearing on the Carina radial profile and shows that the survey method which achieves the highest detected dSph signal-to-background in the outer parts of the galaxy is the Washington M, T2 + DDO51 (MTD) filter approach from Paper II in this series. We then address statistical methods used to evaluate the reliability of MTD surveys in the presence of photometric errors and for which a new, a posteriori statistical analysis methodology is provided. Finally, these statistical methods are tested by new spectroscopy of stars in the MTD-selected Carina candidate sample. Of 74 candidate giants with follow-up spectroscopy, the MTD technique identified 61 new Carina members, including 8 stars outside the King radius. From a sample of 29 stars not initially identified as candidate Carina giants but that lie just outside of our selection criteria, 12 have radial velocities consistent with membership, including 5 extratidal stars. Carina is shown to have an extended population of giant stars extending to a major axis radius of 40' (1.44x the nominal King radius).
  • In an effort to more precisely define the spatial distribution of Galactic field stars, we present an analysis of the photometric parallaxes of 70,000 stars covering nearly 15 square degrees in seven Kapteyn Selected Areas. We address the affects of Malmquist Bias, subgiant/giant contamination, metallicity and binary stars upon the derived density laws. The affect of binary stars is the most significant. We find that while the disk-like populations of the Milky Way are easily constrained in a simultaneous analysis of all seven fields, no good simultaneous solution for the halo is found. We have applied halo density laws taken from other studies and find that the Besancon flattened power law halo model (c/a=0.6, r^-2.75) produces the best fit to our data. With this halo, the thick disk has a scale height of 750 pc with an 8.5% normalization to the old disk. The old disk scale height is 280-300 pc. Corrected for a binary fraction of 50%, these scale heights are 940 pc and 350-375 pc, respectively. Even with this model, there are systematic discrepancies between the observed and predicted density distributions. Our model produces density overpredictions in the inner Galaxy and density underpredictions in the outer Galaxy. A possible solution is modeling the stellar halo as a two-component system in which the halo has a flattened inner distribution and a roughly spherical, but substructured outer distribution. Further reconciliation could be provided by a flared thick disk, a structure consistent with a merger origin for that population. (Abridged)
  • We are exploring the extended stellar distributions of Galactic satellite galaxies and globular clusters. For seven objects studied thus far, the observed profile departs from a King function at large r, revealing a ``break population'' of stars. In our sample, the relative density of the ``break'' correlates to the inferred M/L of these objects. We discuss opposing hypotheses for this trend: (1) Higher M/L objects harbor more extended dark matter halos that support secondary, bound, stellar ``halos''. (2) The extended populations around dwarf spheroidals (and some clusters) consist of unbound, extratidal debris from their parent objects, which are undergoing various degrees of tidal disruption. In this scenario, higher M/L ratios reflect higher degrees of virial non-equilibrium in the parent objects, thus invalidating a precept underlying the use of core radial velocities to obtain masses.