• A scaler has been fabricated to count the signals from any radiation de- tector. It can count signals of frequency up to 140 kHz. Transistor Transistor Logic (TTL) is used in this scaler. In this article the details of the design, fabrication and operation processes of the scaler is presented.
  • The main aim of the study is to perform the long-term stability test of gain of the single mask triple GEM detector. A simple method is used for this long- term stability test using a radioactive X-ray source with high activity. The test is continued till accumulation of charge per unit area > 12.0 mC/mm2. The details of the chamber fabrication, the test set-up, the method of measurement and the test results are presented in this paper.
  • We discuss the connection between quantum interference effects in optical beams and radiation fields emitted from atomic systems. We illustrate this connection by a study of the first- and second-order correlation functions of optical fields and atomic dipole moments. We explore the role of correlations between the emitting systems and present examples of practical methods to implement two systems with non-orthogonal dipole moments. We also derive general conditions for quantum interference in a two-atom system and for a control of spontaneous emission. The relation between population trapping and dark states is also discussed. Moreover, we present quantum dressed-atom models of cancellation of spontaneous emission, amplification on dark transitions, fluorescence quenching and coherent population trapping.
  • We study the Autler-Townes spectrum of a V-type atom coupled to a single-mode, frequency-tunable cavity field at finite termperature, with a pre-selected polarization in the bad cavity limit, and show that, when the mean number of thermal photons $N\gg 1$ and the excited sublevel splitting is very large (the same order as the cavity linewidth), the probe gain may occur at either sideband of the doublet, depending on the cavity frequency, due to the cavity-induced interference.
  • A cavity-modified master equation is derived for a coherently driven, V-type three-level atom coupled to a single-mode cavity in the bad cavity limit. We show that population inversion in both the bare and dressed-state bases may be achieved, originating from the enhancement of the atom-cavity interaction when the cavity is resonant with an atomic dressed-state transition. The atomic populations in the dressed state representation are analysed in terms of the cavity-modified transition rates. The atomic fluorescence spectrum and probe absorption spectrum also investigated, and it is found that the spectral profiles may be controlled by adjusting the cavity frequency. Peak suppression and line narrowing occur under appropriate conditions.
  • It is shown that 100% squeezed output can be produced in the resonance fluorescence from a coherently driven two-level atom interacting with a squeezed vacuum. This is only possible for $N=1/8$ squeezed input, and is associated with a pure atomic state, i.e., a completely polarized state. The quadrature for which optimal squeezing occurs depends on the squeezing phase $\Phi ,$ the Rabi frequency $\Omega ,$ and the atomic detuning $\Delta $. Pure states are described for arbitrary $\Phi ,$ not just $\Phi =0$ or $\pi $ as in previous work. For small values of $N,$ there may be a greater degree of squeezing in the output field than the input - i.e., we have squeezing amplification.
  • We propose a method to observe phase-dependent spectra in resonance fluorescence, employing a two-level atom driven by a strong coherent field and a weak, amplitude-fluctuating field. The spectra are similar to those which occur in a squeezed vacuum, but avoid the problem of achieving squeezing over a $4\pi $ solid angle. The system shows other interesting features, such as pronounced gain without population inversion.