• We apply a newly-developed On-the-Fly mosaicing technique on the NSF's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz in order to carry out a sensitive search for an afterglow from the Advanced LIGO binary black hole merger event GW 151226. In three epochs between 1.5 and 6 months post-merger we observed a 100 sq. deg region, with more than 80% of the survey region having a RMS sensitivity of better than 150 uJy/beam, in the northern hemisphere having a merger containment probability of 10%. The data were processed in near-real-time, and analyzed to search for transients and variables. No transients were found but we have demonstrated the ability to conduct blind searches in a time-frequency phase space where the predicted afterglow signals are strongest. If the gravitational wave event is contained within our survey region, the upper limit on any late-time radio afterglow from the merger event at an assumed mean distance of 440 Mpc is about 1e29 erg/s/Hz. Approximately 1.5% of the radio sources in the field showed variability at a level of 30%, and can be attributed to normal activity from active galactic nuclei. The low rate of false positives in the radio sky suggests that wide-field imaging searches at a few Gigahertz can be an efficient and competitive search strategy. We discuss our search method in the context of the recent afterglow detection from GW 170817 and radio follow-up in future gravitational wave observing runs.
  • We present the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project based on 384 hours of observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz (10 cm) toward the two square degree Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The final mosaic reaches a median rms of 2.3 uJy/beam over the two square degrees at an angular resolution of 0.75". To fully account for the spectral shape and resolution variations across the broad (2 GHz) band, we image all data with a multiscale, multifrequency synthesis algorithm. We present a catalog of 10,830 radio sources down to 5 sigma, out of which 67 are combined from multiple components. Comparing the positions of our 3 GHz sources with those from the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA)-COSMOS survey, we estimate that the astrometry is accurate to 0.01" at the bright end (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N_3GHz > 20). Survival analysis on our data combined with the VLA-COSMOS 1.4~GHz Joint Project catalog yields an expected median radio spectral index of alpha=-0.7. We compute completeness corrections via Monte Carlo simulations to derive the corrected 3 GHz source counts. Our counts are in agreement with previously derived 3 GHz counts based on single-pointing (0.087 square degrees) VLA data. In summary, the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project simultaneously provides the largest and deepest radio continuum survey at high (0.75") angular resolution to date, bridging the gap between last-generation and next-generation surveys.
  • We have commenced a multi-year program, the Caltech-NRAO Stripe 82 Survey (CNSS), to search for radio transients with the Jansky VLA in the SDSS Stripe 82 region. The CNSS will deliver five epochs over the entire $\sim$270 deg$^2$ of Stripe 82, an eventual deep combined map with a rms noise of $\sim$40 $\mu$Jy and catalogs at a frequency of 3 GHz, and having a spatial resolution of 3". This first paper presents the results from an initial pilot survey of a 50 deg$^2$ region of Stripe 82, involving four epochs spanning logarithmic timescales between one week and 1.5 years, with the combined map having a median rms noise of 35 $\mu$Jy. This pilot survey enabled the development of the hardware and software for rapid data processing, as well as transient detection and follow-up, necessary for the full 270 deg$^2$ survey. Classification of variable and transient sources relied heavily on the wealth of multi-wavelength data in the Stripe 82 region, supplemented by repeated mapping of the region by the Palomar Transient Factory. $3.9^{+0.5}_{-0.9}$% of the detected point sources were found to vary by greater than 30%, consistent with similar studies at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz. Multi-wavelength photometric data and light curves suggest that the variability is mostly due to shock-induced flaring in the jets of AGN. Although this was only a pilot survey, we detected two bona fide transients, associated with an RS CVn binary and a dKe star. Comparison with existing radio survey data revealed additional highly variable and transient sources on timescales between 5-20 years, largely associated with renewed AGN activity. The rates of such AGN possibly imply episodes of enhanced accretion and jet activity occurring once every $\sim$40,000 years in these galaxies. We compile the revised radio transient rates and make recommendations for future transient surveys and joint radio-optical experiments. (Abridged)
  • We outline the prospects for performing pioneering radio weak gravitational lensing analyses using observations from a potential forthcoming JVLA Sky Survey program. A large-scale survey with the JVLA can offer interesting and unique opportunities for performing weak lensing studies in the radio band, a field which has until now been the preserve of optical telescopes. In particular, the JVLA has the capacity for large, deep radio surveys with relatively high angular resolution, which are the key characteristics required for a successful weak lensing study. We highlight the potential advantages and unique aspects of performing weak lensing in the radio band. In particular, the inclusion of continuum polarisation information can greatly reduce noise in weak lensing reconstructions and can also remove the effects of intrinsic galaxy alignments, the key astrophysical systematic effect that limits weak lensing at all wavelengths. We identify a VLASS "deep fields" program (total area ~10-20 square degs), to be conducted at L-band and with high-resolution (A-array configuration), as the optimal survey strategy from the point of view of weak lensing science. Such a survey will build on the unique strengths of the JVLA and will remain unsurpassed in terms of its combination of resolution and sensitivity until the advent of the Square Kilometre Array. We identify the best fields on the JVLA-accessible sky from the point of view of overlapping with existing deep optical and near infra-red data which will provide crucial redshift information and facilitate a host of additional compelling multi-wavelength science.
  • The 100-m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) 40-m radio telescope have been used to conduct a survey of 3165 known extragalactic radio sources over 143 square degrees of the sky. Target sources were selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey in fields observed by the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI); most are extragalactic active galactic nuclei (AGN) with 1.4 GHz flux densities of 3 to 10 mJy. The resulting 31 GHz catalogs are presented in full online. Using a Maximum-Likelihood analysis to obtain an unbiased estimate of the distribution of the 1.4 to 31 GHz spectral indices of these sources, we find a mean 31 to 1.4 GHz flux ratio of 0.110 +/- 0.003 corresponding to a spectral index of alpha=-0.71 +/- 0.01 (S ~ nu^alpha); 9.0 +/- 0.8 % of sources have alpha > -0.5 and 1.2 +/- 0.2 % have alpha > 0. By combining this spectral index distribution with 1.4 GHz source counts we predict 31 GHz source counts in the range 1 mJy < S_31 < 4 mJy, N(>S_31) = (16.7 +/- 1.7) deg^2 (S_31/1 mJy)^(-0.80 +/- 0.07). We also assess the contribution of mJy-level (S_1.4 < 3.4 mJy) radio sources to the 31 GHz CMB power spectrum, finding a mean power of ell (ell+1) C^src_ell/(2 pi) = 44 +/- 14 micro-Kelvin^2 and a 95% upper limit of 80 micro-Kelvin^2 at ell = 2500. Including an estimated contribution of 12 micro-Kelvin^2 from the population of sources responsible for the turn-up in counts below S_1.4 = 1 mJy this amounts to 21 +/- 7 % of what is needed to explain the CBI high-ell excess signal, 275 +/- 63 micro-Kelvin^2. These results are consistent with other measurements of the 31 GHz point source foreground.
  • We are learning much about how structure forms, in particular how clusters as nodes in the cosmic web evolve and accrete matter, and about the physical processes within these objects. In the next decade, the study of clusters will enable us to tackle important questions regarding the nature of Dark Matter and Dark Energy, how clusters co-evolve with super-massive black holes at their centers, and to advance our knowledge about fundamental plasma astrophysics. This science white paper outlines the key questions and research opportunities in cluster astrophysics that are emerging in the coming decade and beyond, and serves as an overview to other cluster related white papers.
  • We present new measurements of the power spectra of the E-mode of CMB polarization, the temperature T, the cross-correlation of E and T, and upper limits on the B-mode from 2.5 years of dedicated Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) observations. Both raw maps and optimal signal images in the uv-plane and real space show strong detections of the E-mode (11.7 sigma for the EE power spectrum overall) and no detection of the B-mode. The power spectra are used to constrain parameters of the flat tilted adiabatic Lambda-CDM models: those determined from EE and TE bandpowers agree with those from TT, a powerful consistency check. There is little tolerance for shifting polarization peaks from the TT-forecast locations, as measured by the angular sound crossing scale theta = 100 ell_s = 1.03 +/- 0.02 from EE and TE cf. 1.044 +/- 0.005 with the TT data included. The scope for extra out-of-phase peaks from subdominant isocurvature modes is also curtailed. The EE and TE measurements of CBI, DASI and BOOMERANG are mutually consistent, and, taken together rather than singly, give enhanced leverage for these tests.
  • We present coincident observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from the Very Small Array (VSA) and Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) telescopes. The consistency of the full datasets is tested in the map plane and the Fourier plane, prior to the usual compression of CMB data into flat bandpowers. Of the three mosaics observed by each group, two are found to be in excellent agreement. In the third mosaic, there is a 2 sigma discrepancy between the correlation of the data and the level expected from Monte Carlo simulations. This is shown to be consistent with increased phase calibration errors on VSA data during summer observations. We also consider the parameter estimation method of each group. The key difference is the use of the variance window function in place of the bandpower window function, an approximation used by the VSA group. A re-evaluation of the VSA parameter estimates, using bandpower windows, shows that the two methods yield consistent results.
  • We present full polarization Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 5 GHz and 15 GHz of 24 compact active galactic nuclei (AGN). These sources were observed as part of a pilot project to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting a large VLBI survey to further our understanding of the physical properties and temporal evolution of AGN jets. The sample is drawn from the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) where it overlaps with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at declinations north of 15 degrees. There are 2100 CLASS sources brighter than 50 mJy at 8.4 GHz, of which we have chosen 24 for this pilot study. All 24 sources were detected and imaged at 5 GHz with a typical dynamic range of 500:1, and 21 of 24 sources were detected and imaged at 15 GHz. Linear polarization was detected in 8 sources at both 5 and 15 GHz, allowing for the creation of Faraday rotation measure (RM) images. The core RMs for the sample were found to have an average absolute value of 390 +/- 100 rad/m^2. We also present the discovery of a new Compact Symmetric Object, J08553+5751. All data were processed automatically using pipelines created or adapted for the survey.
  • We discuss the nature of the possible high-l excess in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum observed by the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI). We probe the angular structure of the excess in the CBI deep fields and investigate whether it could be due to the scattering of CMB photons by hot electrons within clusters, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. We estimate the density fluctuation parameters for amplitude, sigma_8, and shape, Gamma, from CMB primary anisotropy data and other cosmological data. We use the results of two separate hydrodynamical codes for Lambda-CDM cosmologies, consistent with the allowed sigma_8 and Gamma values, to quantify the expected contribution from the SZ effect to the bandpowers of the CBI experiment and pass simulated SZ effect maps through our CBI analysis pipeline. The result is very sensitive to the value of sigma_8, and is roughly consistent with the observed power if sigma_8 ~ 1. We conclude that the CBI anomaly could be a result of the SZ effect for the class of Lambda-CDM concordance models if sigma_8 is in the upper range of values allowed by current CMB and Large Scale Structure (LSS) data.
  • Polarization observations of the cosmic microwave background with the Cosmic Background Imager from September 2002 to May 2004 provide a significant detection of the E-mode polarization and reveal an angular power spectrum of polarized emission showing peaks and valleys that are shifted in phase by half a cycle relative to those of the total intensity spectrum. This key agreement between the phase of the observed polarization spectrum and that predicted based on the total intensity spectrum provides support for the standard model of cosmology, in which dark matter and dark energy are the dominant constituents, the geometry is close to flat, and primordial density fluctuations are predominantly adiabatic with a matter power spectrum commensurate with inflationary cosmological models.
  • Two years of microwave background observations with the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) have been combined to give a sensitive, high resolution angular power spectrum over the range 400 < l < 3500. This power spectrum has been referenced to a more accurate overall calibration derived from WMAP. The data cover 90 deg^2 including three pointings targeted for deep observations. The uncertainty on the l > 2000 power previously seen with the CBI is reduced. Under the assumption that any signal in excess of the primary anisotropy is due to a secondary Sunyaev-Zeldovich anisotropy in distant galaxy clusters we use CBI, ACBAR, and BIMA data to place a constraint on the present-day rms mass fluctuation sigma_8. We present the results of a cosmological parameter analysis on the l < 2000 primary anisotropy data which show significant improvements in the parameters as compared to WMAP alone, and we explore the role of the small-scale cosmic microwave background data in breaking parameter degeneracies.
  • The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) is an international collaborative program which has obtained high-resolution radio images of over 10000 flat-spectrum radio sources in order to create the largest and best studied statistical sample of radio-loud gravitationally lensed systems. With this survey, combined with detailed studies of the lenses found therein, constraints can be placed on the expansion rate, matter density, and dark energy (e.g. cosmological constant, quintessence) content of the Universe that are complementary to and independent of those obtained through other methods. CLASS is aimed at identifying lenses where multiple images are formed from compact flat-spectrum radio sources, which should be easily identifiable in the radio maps. Because CLASS is radio-based, dust obscuration in lensing galaxies is not a factor, and the relative insensitivity of the instrument to environmental conditions leads to nearly uniform sensitivity and resolution over the entire survey. In four observing seasons from 1994-1999, CLASS has observed 13783 radio sources with the VLA at 8.4 GHz at 0.2 arcsecond resolution. When combined with the JVAS survey, the CLASS sample contains over 16,000 images. A complete sample of 11685 flat-spectrum sources was observed, selected from GB6 catalogue at 4.85 GHz and the NVSS at 1.4 GHz. So far, CLASS has found 16 new gravitational lens systems, and the JVAS/CLASS survey contains a total of 22 lenses. (Abridged)
  • We derive cosmological parameters from the CBI measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) angular power spectrum. Our results provide an independent confirmation of the standard $\Omega_{\rm tot}=1$ $\Lambda$CDM model within the adiabatic, inflationary paradigm. Above $\ell=2000$ the observations show evidence of power in excess of that expected in the standard models. We use hydrodynamical simulations to show how Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect (SZE) may account for the excess power for models with fluctuation amplitude $\sigma_8\sim 1$ which is in the high end of the range allowed by the primary CMB observations.
  • We describe an algorithm for the extraction of the angular power spectrum of an intensity field, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB), from interferometer data. This new method, based on the gridding of interferometer visibilities in the aperture plane followed by a maximum likelihood solution for bandpowers, is much faster than direct likelihood analysis of the visibilities, and deals with foreground radio sources, multiple pointings, and differencing. The gridded aperture-plane estimators are also used to construct Wiener-filtered images using the signal and noise covariance matrices used in the likelihood analysis. Results are shown for simulated data. The method has been used to determine the power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background from observations with the Cosmic Background Imager, and the results are given in companion papers.
  • Design and performance details are given for the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI), an interferometer array that is measuring the power spectrum of fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) for multipoles in the range 400 < l < 3500. The CBI is located at an altitude of 5000 m in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. It is a planar synthesis array with 13 0.9-m diameter antennas on a 6-m diameter tracking platform. Each antenna has a cooled, low-noise receiver operating in the 26-36 GHz band. Signals are cross-correlated in an analog filterbank correlator with ten 1 GHz bands. This allows spectral index measurements which can be used to distinguish CMBR signals from diffuse galactic foregrounds. A 1.2 kHz 180-deg phase switching scheme is used to reject cross-talk and low-frequency pick-up in the signal processing system. The CBI has a 3-axis mount which allows the tracking platform to be rotated about the optical axis, providing improved (u,v) coverage and a powerful discriminant against false signals generated in the receiving electronics. Rotating the tracking platform also permits polarization measurements when some of the antennas are configured for the orthogonal polarization.
  • We report a measurement of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) on 7-22 arcminute scales. Observations of 36 fields near the North Celestial Pole (NCP) were made at 31.7 and 14.5 GHz, using the 5.5-meter and 40-meter telescopes at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) from 1993 to 1996. Multi-epoch VLA observations at 8.5 and 15 GHz allow removal of discrete source contamination. After point-source subtraction, we detect significant structure, which we identify with emission from a combination of a steep-spectrum foreground and the CMBR. The foreground component is found to correlate with IRAS 100 micron dust emission. Lack of H-alpha emission near the NCP suggests that this foreground is either high-temperature thermal bremsstrahlung (T_e ~ 10^6 K), flat-spectrum synchrotron or an exotic component of dust emission. On the basis of low-frequency maps of the NCP, we can restrict the spectral index of the foreground to beta >= -2.2. Although the foreground signal dominates at 14.5 GHz, the extracted CMBR component contributes 88\% of the variance at 31.7 GHz, yielding an rms fluctuation amplitude of 82^{+12.1}_{-9.1} microKelvin, including 4.3% calibration uncertainty and 12% sample variance (68% confidence). The equivalent broadband amplitude is dT_{l_e} = 59^{+8.6}_{-6.5} microKelvin at l_e = 589. This measurement, when combined with small angular-scale upper limits obtained at the OVRO, indicates that the CMBR angular power spectrum decreases between l ~ 600 and l ~ 2000 and is consistent with flat cosmological models.
  • The third phase of the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) has recently been completed, bringing the total number of sources imaged to over 15000 in the CLASS and JVAS combined survey. In the VLA observations carried out in March and April of 1998, two new candidate lensed systems were discovered: CLASS B1152+199 and B1359+154. B1152+199 is a 1.6 arcsecond double, with a background quasar at z=1.019 lensed by a foreground galaxy at z=0.439. The relatively flat radio spectra of the lensed images, combined with a previous ROSAT detection of the source, make B1152+199 a strong candidate for time delay studies at both radio and X-ray wavelengths. B1359+154 is a quadruply lensed quasar at z=3.235, with a maximum image separation of 1.7 arcseconds. As yet, the redshift of the lensing object in this system is undetermined. The steep spectral index of the source suggests that B1359+154 will not exhibit strong variability, and is therefore unlikely to be useful for determining the Hubble constant from measured time delays.
  • The JVAS (Jodrell Bank-VLA Astrometric Survey) and CLASS (Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey) are well-defined surveys containing about ten thousand flat-spectrum radio sources. For many reasons, flat-spectrum radio sources are particularly well-suited as a population from which one can obtain unbiased samples of gravitational lenses. These are by far the largest gravitational (macro)lens surveys, and particular attention was paid to constructing a cleanly-defined sample for the survey itself and for the underlying luminosity function. Here we present the constraints on cosmological parameters, particularly the cosmological constant, derived from JVAS and combine them with constraints from optical gravitational lens surveys, `direct' measurements of $\Omega_{0}$, $H_{0}$ and the age of the universe, and constraints derived from CMB anisotropies, before putting this final result into the context of the latest results from other, independent cosmological tests.
  • We report the discovery of the most complex arcsec-scale radio gravitational lens system yet known. B1933+503 was found during the course of the CLASS survey and MERLIN and VLA radio maps reveal up to 10 components. Four of these are compact and have flat spectra; the rest are more extended and have steep spectra. The background lensed object appears to consist of a flat spectrum core (quadruply imaged) and two compact "lobes" symmetrically disposed relative to the core. One of the lobes is quadruply imaged while the other is doubly imaged. An HST observation of the system with the WFPC2 shows a galaxy with an axial ratio of 0.5, but none of the images of the background object are detected. A redshift of 0.755 has been measured for the lens galaxy.
  • We present results from microwave background observations at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory. These observations, at 14.5 and 32 GHz, are designed to detect intrinsic anisotropy on scales of 7'. After point source removal, we detect significant emission with temperature spectral index beta ~ -2 towards the North Celestial Pole (NCP). Comparison of our data with the IRAS 100 micron map of the same fields reveals a strong correlation between this emission and the infrared dust emission. From the lack of detectable H-alpha emission, we conclude that the signals are consistent either with flat-spectrum synchrotron radiation, or with free-free emission from T_e ~ 10^6 K gas, probably associated with a large HI feature known as the NCP Loop. Assuming beta = -2.2, our data indicate a conversion T_f/I_(100 micron) = 0.075*nu(GHz)^-2.2 K/(MJy/sr). The detection of such a component suggests that we should be cautious in any assumptions made regarding foregrounds when designing experiments to map the microwave background radiation.
  • This paper reports the measurement of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) in the nearby clusters A478, A2142 and A2256 at 32 GHz. These clusters are part of a complete X-ray flux limited sample, which includes the previously measured Coma cluster. We find surface baryonic mass densities for the hot IGM within the 7.35' FWHM Gaussian beam of the OVRO 5.5-m telescope projected on the cluster centers. This is used to place lower limits on the ratio of the SZE determined baryonic mass to the gravitational binding mass. When combined with available X-ray models, the data from these three clusters and Coma yields a sample average value for the Hubble constant of 54 +/- 14 km/s/Mpc.