• At the future high luminosity electron-positron collider FCC-ee proposed for CERN, the precise measurement of the charge asymmetry in $e^+ e^- \to \mu^+ \mu^-$ near the Z resonance is of special interest. In particular, such a measurement at $M_Z \pm 3.5$ GeV may provide a very precise measurement of the electromagnetic coupling at the scale $\sim M_Z$, a fundamental constant of the Standard Model. However, this charge asymmetry is plagued by a large trivial contribution from the interference of photon emission from initial state electrons and final state muons. We address the question whether this interference can be reliably calculated and subtracted with the help of a resummed QED calculation.
  • GRB060505 and GRB060614 are nearby long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) without accompanying supernovae (SNe) down to very strict limits. They thereby challenge the conventional LGRB-SN connection and naturally give rise to the question: are there other peculiar features in their afterglows which would help shed light on their progenitors? To answer this question, we combine new observational data with published data and investigate the multi-band temporal and spectral properties of the two afterglows. We find that both afterglows can be well interpreted within the framework of the jetted standard external shock wave model, and that the afterglow parameters for both bursts fall well within the range observed for other LGRBs. Hence, from the properties of the afterglows there is nothing to suggest that these bursts should have another progenitor than other LGRBs. Recently, Swift-discovered GRB080503 also has the spike + tail structure during its prompt gamma-ray emission seemingly similar to GRB060614. We analyse the prompt emission of this burst and find that this GRB is actually a hard-spike + hard-tail burst with a spectral lag of 0.8$\pm$0.4 s during its tail emission. Thus, the properties of the prompt emission of GRB060614 and GRB080503 are clearly different, motivating further thinking of GRB classification. Finally we note that, whereas the progenitor of the two SN-less bursts remains uncertain, the core-collapse origin for the SN-less bursts would be quite certain if a wind-like environment can be observationally established, e.g, from an optical decay faster than the X-ray decay in the afterglow's slow cooling phase.
  • The optical afterglow of long-duration GRB 071003 is among the brightest yet to be detected from any GRB, with R ~ 12 mag in KAIT observations starting 42 s after the GRB trigger, including filtered detections during prompt emission. However, our high S/N ratio afterglow spectrum displays only extremely weak absorption lines at what we argue is the host redshift of z = 1.60435 - in contrast to the three other, much stronger Mg II absorption systems observed at lower redshifts. Together with Keck adaptive optics observations which fail to reveal a host galaxy coincident with the burst position, our observations suggest a halo progenitor and offer a cautionary tale about the use of Mg II for GRB redshift determination. We present early through late-time observations spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, constrain the connection between the prompt emission and early variations in the light curve (we observe no correlation), and discuss possible origins for an unusual, marked rebrightening that occurs a few hours after the burst: likely either a late-time refreshed shock or a wide-angle secondary jet. Analysis of the late-time afterglow is most consistent with a wind environment, suggesting a massive star progenitor. Together with GRB 070125, this may indicate that a small but significant portion of star formation in the early universe occurred far outside what we consider a normal galactic disk.
  • At z=0.1055, the gamma-ray burst GRB 031203 is one of the two nearest GRBs known. Using observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) and Chandra X-ray Observatory, we derive sub-arcsecond localizations of the radio and X-ray afterglow of this GRB. We present near-infrared observations of the supernova SN 2003lw, which exploded in the host galaxy of the GRB 031203. Our deep, high resolution Magellan/PANIC data establish that this SN is spatially coincident with the radio and X-ray localizations of the afterglow of GRB 031203 to sub-arcsecond precision, and is thus firmly associated with the GRB. We use image differencing to subtract the bright emission from the host galaxy, and measure the time evolution of the SN between ~5 and ~50 days after the GRB. The resulting light curve has a shape which is quite different from that of the two SNe previously associated with GRBs, SN 1998bw and SN 2003dh. With SN 2003lw securely associated with this burst, we confirm that all three GRBs with redshifts z<0.3 were accompanied by SN explosions.
  • Studies of the cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their host galaxies are starting to provide interesting or even unique new insights in observational cosmology. GRBs represent a new way of identifying a population of star-forming galaxies at cosmological redshifts. GRB hosts are broadly similar to the normal field galaxy populations at comparable redshifts and magnitudes, and indicate at most a mild luminosity evolution out to z ~ 1.5 - 2. GRB optical afterglows seen in absorption provide a powerful new probe of the ISM in dense, central regions of their host galaxies, complementary to the traditional studies using QSO absorbers. Some GRB hosts are heavily obscured, and provide a new way to select a population of cosmological sub-mm sources, and a novel constraint on the total obscured fraction of star formation over the history of the universe. Finally, detection of GRB afterglows at z > 6 may provide a unique way to probe the primordial star formation, massive IMF, early IGM, and chemical enrichment at the end of the cosmic reionization era.
  • Studies of the cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their host galaxies are now starting to provide interesting or even unique new insights in observational cosmology. Observed GRB host galaxies have a median magnitude R ~ 25 mag, and show a range of luminosities, morphologies, and star formation rates, with a median redshift z ~ 1. They represent a new way of identifying a population of star-forming galaxies at cosmological redshifts, which is mostly independent of the traditional selection methods. They seem to be broadly similar to the normal field galaxy populations at comparable redshifts and magnitudes, and indicate at most a mild luminosity evolution over the redshift range they probe. Studies of GRB optical afterglows seen in absorption provide a powerful new probe of the ISM in dense, central regions of their host galaxies, which is complementary to the traditional studies using QSO absorption line systems. Some GRB hosts are heavily obscured, and provide a new way to select a population of cosmological sub-mm sources. A census of detected optical tranistents may provide an important new way to constrain the total obscured fraction of star formation over the history of the universe. Finally, detection of GRB afterglows at high redshifts (z > 6) may provide a unique way to probe the primordial star formation, massive IMF, early IGM, and chemical enrichment at the end of the cosmic reionization era.
  • We present multi-color light-curves of the optical afterglow of GRB 000926. Beginning ~1.5 days after the burst, the light-curves of this GRB steepen measurably. The existence of such achromatic breaks are usually taken to be an important observational signature that the ejecta are not expanding isotropically, but rather have a collimated jet-like geometry. If we interpret the data in this context, we derive an opening angle of 5 degrees, which reduces the energy release compared to an isotropic model by a factor of ~275, to 1.7 x 10^51 erg. To fit the data with a simple jet model requires extinction along the line of sight. The derived A_V is in the range 0.11 - 0.82 mag, depending on the adopted extinction law and whether the electrons giving rise to the optical emission are undergoing synchrotron cooling or not. Since this is in excess of the expected extinction from our Galaxy, we attribute this to the GRB host. We note that this extinction is typical of a galactic disk, and therefore the event likely took place in the disk of its host.