• Helioseismology and asteroseismology of red giant stars have shown that the distribution of angular momentum in stellar interiors, and its evolution with time remains an open issue in stellar physics. Owing to the unprecedented quality of Kepler photometry, we are able to seismically infer internal rotation rates in \gamma Doradus stars, which provide the MS counterpart to the red-giants puzzle. We confront these internal rotation rates to stellar evolution models with rotationally induced transport of angular momentum, in order to test angular momentum transport mechanisms. We used a stellar model-independent method developed by Christophe et al. in order to obtain seismically inferred, buoyancy radii and near-core rotation for 37 \gamma Doradus stars observed by Kepler. We show that the buoyancy radius can be used as a reliable evolution indicator for field stars on the MS. We computed rotating evolutionary models including transport of angular momentum in radiative zones, following Zahn and Maeder, with the CESTAM code. This code calculates the rotational history of stars from the birth line to the tip of the RGB. The initial angular momentum content has to be set initially, which is done by fitting rotation periods in young stellar clusters. We show a clear disagreement between the near-core rotation rates measured in the sample and the rotation rates obtained from evolutionary models including rotationally induced transport following Zahn (1992). These results show a disagreement similar to that of the Sun and red giant stars. This suggests the existence of missing mechanisms responsible for the braking of the core before and along the MS. The efficiency of the missing mechanisms is investigated. The transport of angular momentum as formalized by Zahn and Maeder cannot explain the measurements of near-core rotation in main-sequence intermediate-mass stars we have at hand.
  • The {\gamma} Dor pulsating stars present high-order gravity modes, which make them important targets in the intermediate-and low-mass main-sequence region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Whilst we have only access to rotation in the envelope of the Sun, the g modes of {\gamma} Dor stars can in principle deliver us constraints on the inner layers. With the puzzling discovery of unexpectedly low rotation rates in the core of red giants, the {\gamma} Dor stars appear now as unique targets to explore internal angular momentum transport in the progenitors of red giants. Yet, the {\gamma} Dor pulsations remain hard to detect from the ground for their periods are close to 1 day. While the CoRoT space mission first revealed intriguing frequency spectra, the almost uninterrupted 4-year photometry from the Kepler mission eventually shed a new light on them. It revealed regularities in the spectra, expected to bear signature of physical processes, including rotation, in the shear layers close to the convective core. We present here the first results of our effort to derive exploitable seismic diagnosis for mid- to fast rotators among {\gamma} Dor stars. We confirm their potential to explore the rotation history of this early phase of stellar evolution.
  • With four years of nearly-continuous photometry from Kepler, we are finally in a good position to apply asteroseismology to $\gamma$ Doradus stars. In particular several analyses have demonstrated the possibility to detect non-uniform period spacings, which have been predicted to be directly related to rotation. In the present work, we define a new seismic diagnostic for rotation in $\gamma$ Doradus stars that are too rapidly rotating to present rotational splittings. Based on the non uniformity of their period spacings, we define the observable $\Sigma$ as the slope of the period spacing when plotted as a function of period. We provide a one-to-one relation between this observable $\Sigma$ and the internal rotation, which applies widely in the instability strip of $\gamma$ Doradus stars. We apply the diagnostic to a handful of stars observed by Kepler. Thanks to g-modes in $\gamma$ Doradus stars, we are now able to determine the internal rotation of stars on the lower main sequence, which is still not possible for Sun-like stars.
  • Asteroseismology is a powerful tool to access the internal structure of stars. Apart from the important impact of theoretical developments, progress in this field has been commonly associated with the analysis of time-resolved observations. Recently, the so-called macroturbulent broadening has been proposed to be a complementary and less expensive way -- in terms of observational time -- to investigate pulsations in massive stars. We assess to what extent this ubiquitous non-rotational broadening component shaping the line profiles of O stars and B supergiants is a spectroscopic signature of pulsation modes driven by a heat mechanism. We compute stellar main sequence and post-main sequence models from 3 to 70Msun with the ATON stellar evolution code and determine the instability domains for heat-driven modes for degrees l=1-20 using the adiabatic and non-adiabatic codes LOSC and MAD. We use the observational material presented in Sim\'on-D\'iaz et al. (2016) to investigate possible correlations between the single snapshot line-broadening properties of a sample of ~260 O and B-type stars and their location inside/outside the various predicted instability domains. We present an homogeneous prediction for the non-radial instability domains of massive stars for degree l up to 20. We provide a global picture of what to expect from an observational point of view in terms of frequency range of excited modes, and investigate the behavior of the instabilities with stellar evolution and increasing degree of the mode. Furthermore, our pulsational stability analysis, once compared to the empirical results of Sim\'on-D\'iaz et al. (2016), indicates that stellar oscillations originated by a heat mechanism can not explain alone the occurrence of the large non-rotational line-broadening component commonly detected in the O star and B supergiant domain.
  • A recent photometric survey in the NGC~3766 cluster led to the detection of stars presenting an unexpected variability. They lie in a region of the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram where no pulsation are theoretically expected, in between the $\delta$ Scuti and slowly pulsating B (SPB) star instability domains. Their variability periods, between $\sim$0.1--0.7~d, are outside the expected domains of these well-known pulsators. The NCG~3766 cluster is known to host fast rotating stars. Rotation can significantly affect the pulsation properties of stars and alter their apparent luminosity through gravity darkening. Therefore we inspect if the new variable stars could correspond to fast rotating SPB stars. We carry out instability and visibility analysis of SPB pulsation modes within the frame of the traditional approximation. The effects of gravity darkening on typical SPB models are next studied. We find that at the red border of the SPB instability strip, prograde sectoral (PS) modes are preferentially excited, with periods shifted in the 0.2--0.5~d range due to the Coriolis effect. These modes are best seen when the star is seen equator-on. For such inclinations, low-mass SPB models can appear fainter due to gravity darkening and as if they were located between the $\delta$~Scuti and SPB instability strips.