• We observed an arch filament system (AFS) in a sunspot group with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph attached to the GREGOR solar telescope. The AFS was located between the leading sunspot of negative polarity and several pores of positive polarity forming the following part of the sunspot group. We recorded five spectro-polarimetric scans of this region. The spectral range included the spectral lines Si I 1082.7 nm, He I 1083.0 nm, and Ca I 1083.9 nm. In this work we concentrate on the silicon line which is formed in the upper photosphere. The line profiles are inverted with the code `Stokes Inversion based on Response functions' to obtain the magnetic field vector. The line-of-sight velocities are determined independently with a Fourier phase method. Maximum velocities are found close to the ends of AFS fibrils. These maximum values amount to 2.4 km/s next to the pores and to 4 km/s at the sunspot side. Between the following pores, we encounter an area of negative polarity that is decreasing during the five scans. We interpret this by new emerging positive flux in this area canceling out the negative flux. In summary, our findings confirm the scenario that rising magnetic flux tubes cause the AFS.
  • The Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) is a spectropolarimeter built by four institutions in Spain that flew on board the Sunrise balloon-borne telesocope in June 2009 for almost six days over the Arctic Circle. As a polarimeter IMaX uses fast polarization modulation (based on the use of two liquid crystal retarders), real-time image accumulation, and dual beam polarimetry to reach polarization sensitivities of 0.1%. As a spectrograph, the instrument uses a LiNbO3 etalon in double pass and a narrow band pre-filter to achieve a spectral resolution of 85 mAA. IMaX uses the high Zeeman sensitive line of Fe I at 5250.2 AA and observes all four Stokes parameters at various points inside the spectral line. This allows vector magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and intensity frames to be produced that, after reconstruction, reach spatial resolutions in the 0.15-0.18 arcsec range over a 50x50 arcsec FOV. Time cadences vary between ten and 33 seconds, although the shortest one only includes longitudinal polarimetry. The spectral line is sampled in various ways depending on the applied observing mode, from just two points inside the line to 11 of them. All observing modes include one extra wavelength point in the nearby continuum. Gauss equivalent sensitivities are four Gauss for longitudinal fields and 80 Gauss for transverse fields per wavelength sample. The LOS velocities are estimated with statistical errors of the order of 5-40 m/s. The design, calibration and integration phases of the instrument, together with the implemented data reduction scheme are described in some detail.
  • Context: Except for the Ca II resonance lines, fibrils are ubiquitously present in most high-resolution observations of chromospheric lines. Aims: We show that fibrils are also a prevailing feature in Ca II K, provided the spatial-resolution is sufficiently high. Methods: We present high spatial resolution observations of an active region in the Ca I} K line from the Swedish Solar Telescope. Through a comparison between photospheric intensity and magnetic field data, we study the connection between bright chromospheric fibrils and photospheric structures. Additionally, using Fourier analysis we study how the fibrils are linked to the observed dynamics. Results: We find that very narrow, bright fibrils are a prevailing feature over large portions of the observed field. We also find a clear connection between the fibril footpoints and photospheric magnetic features. We show that the fibrils play two distinct roles in the observed dynamics: depending on their location they can act as a canopy suppressing oscillations or they can channel low-frequency oscillations into the chromosphere. Conclusions: The Ca II K fibrils share many characteristics with fibrils observed in other chromospheric lines, but some features, such as the very small widths, are unique to these observations.