• Faint X-ray emission from hot plasma (T > 1 MK) has been detected extending outward a few arcseconds along the optically-delineated jets of some classical T Tauri stars including RY Tau. The mechanism and location where the jet is heated to X-ray temperatures is unknown. We present high spatial resolution HST far-ultraviolet long-slit observations of RY Tau with the slit aligned along the jet. The primary objective was to search for C IV emission from warm plasma at T(CIV) ~ 10$^{5}$ K within the inner jet (<1 arcsec) that cannot be fully-resolved by X-ray telescopes. Spatially-resolved C IV emission is detected in the blueshifted jet extending outward from the star to 1 arcsec and in the redshifted jet out to 0.5 arcsec. C IV line centroid shifts give a radial velocity in the blueshifted jet of -136 $\pm$ 10 km/s at an offset of 0.29 arcsec (39 au) and deceleration outward is detected. The deprojected jet speed is subject to uncertainties in the jet inclination but values >200 km/s are likely. The mass-loss rate in the blueshifted jet is at least 2.3 $\times$ 10$^{-9}$ M_sun yr$^{-1}$, consistent with optical determinations. We use the HST data along with optically-determined jet morphology to place meaningful constraints on candidate jet-heating models including a hot-launch model in which the jet is heated near the base to X-ray temperatures by an unspecified (but probably magnetic) process, and downstream heating from shocks or a putative jet magnetic field.
  • The short-period (1.64 d) near-contact eclipsing WN6+O9 binary system CQ Cep provides an ideal laboratory for testing the predictions of X-ray colliding wind shock theory at close separation where the winds may not have reached terminal speeds before colliding. We present results of a Chandra X-ray observation of CQ Cep spanning ~1 day during which a simultaneous Chandra optical light curve was acquired. Our primary objective was to compare the observed X-ray properties with colliding wind shock theory, which predicts that the hottest shock plasma (T > 20 MK) will form on or near the line-of-centers between the stars. The X-ray spectrum is strikingly similar to apparently single WN6 stars such as WR 134 and spectral lines reveal plasma over a broad range of temperatures T ~ 4 - 40 MK. A deep optical eclipse was seen as the O star passed in front of the Wolf-Rayet star and we determine an orbital period P = 1.6412400 d. Somewhat surprisingly, no significant X-ray variability was detected. This implies that the hottest X-ray plasma is not confined to the region between the stars, at odds with the colliding wind picture and suggesting that other X-ray production mechanisms may be at work. Hydrodynamic simulations that account for such effects as radiative cooling and orbital motion will be needed to determine if the new Chandra results can be reconciled with the colliding wind picture.
  • {Abridged version for ArXiv}. We provide direct constraints on the origin of the [Ne II] emission in 15 young stars using high-spatial and spectral resolution observations with VISIR at the VLT that allow us to study the kinematics of the emitting gas. In addition we compare the [Ne II] line with optical forbidden lines observed for three stars with UVES. The [Ne II] line was detected in 7 stars, among them the first confirmed detection of [Ne II] in a Herbig Be star, V892 Tau. In four cases, the large blueshifted lines indicate an origin in a jet. In two stars, the small shifts and asymmetric profiles indicate an origin in a photo-evaporative wind. CoKu Tau 1, seen close to edge-on, shows a spatially unresolved line centered at the stellar rest velocity, although cross-dispersion centroids move within 10 AU from one side of the star to the other as a function of wavelength. The line profile is symmetric with wings extending up to about +-80 km/s. The origin of the [Ne II] line could either be due to the bipolar jet or to the disk. For the stars with VLT-UVES observations, in several cases, the optical forbidden line profiles and shifts are very similar to the profile of the [Ne II] line, suggesting that the lines are emitted in the same region. A general trend observed with VISIR is a lower line flux when compared with the fluxes obtained with Spitzer. We found no correlation between the line full-width at half maximum and the line peak velocity. The [Ne II] line remains undetected in a large part of the sample, an indication that the emission detected with Spitzer in those stars is likely extended.
  • We report results of a sensitive Chandra ACIS-S observation of the classical T Tauri star RY Tau. Previous studies have shown that it drives a spectacular bipolar jet whose blueshifted component is traced optically along P.A. approximately 295 degrees at separations of 1.5 - 31 arcseconds from the star. Complex X-ray emission is revealed, including a very soft non-variable spectral component (some of which may originate in shocks), a superhot flaring component (T >= 100 MK), and faint extended structure near the star. The structure is visible in deconvolved images and extends northwestward out to a separation of 1.7 arcseconds, overlapping the inner part of the optical jet. Image analysis suggests that most of the extension is real, but some contamination by PSF-induced structure within the central arcsecond may be present. The predicted temperature for a shock-heated jet based on jet speed and shock speed estimates from optical measurements is too low to explain the extended X-ray structure. Either higher speed material within the jet has escaped optical detection or other mechanisms besides shock-heating are involved. Alternative mechanisms that could produce higher temperature plasma at small offsets to the northwest of RY Tau include magnetic heating in the jet, hot plasmoids ejected at high speeds, or X-ray emission from a putative close companion whose presence has been inferred from Hipparcos variations.
  • We report on new X-ray observations of the classical T Tauri star DG Tau. DG Tau drives a collimated bi-polar jet known to be a source of X-ray emission perhaps driven by internal shocks. The rather modest extinction permits study of the jet system to distances very close to the star itself. Our initial results presented here show that the spatially resolved X-ray jet has been moving and fading during the past six years. In contrast, a stationary, very soft source much closer (~ 0.15-0.2") to the star but apparently also related to the jet has brightened during the same period. We report accurate temperatures and absorption column densities toward this source, which is probably associated with the jet base or the jet collimation region.
  • We summarize new X-ray detections of four nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars obtained in a limited survey aimed at establishing the X-ray properties of WN stars across their full range of spectral subtypes. None of the detected stars is so far known to be a close binary. We report Chandra detections of WR 2 (WN2), WR 18 (WN4), and WR 134 (WN6), and an XMM-Newton detection of WR79a (WN9ha). These observations clearly demonstrate that both WNE and WNL stars are X-ray sources. We also discuss Chandra archive detections of the WN6h stars WR 20b, WR 24, and WR 136 and ROSAT non-detections of WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). The X-ray spectra of all WN detections show prominent emission lines and an admixture of cool (kT < 1 keV) and hot (kT > 2 keV) plasma. The hotter plasma is not predicted by radiative wind shock models and other as yet unidentified mechanisms are at work. Most stars show X-ray absorption in excess of that expected from visual extinction (Av), likely due to their strong winds or cold circumstellar gas. Existing data suggest a falloff in X-ray luminosity toward later WN7-9 subtypes, which have higher Lbol but slower, denser winds than WN2-6 stars. This provides a clue that wind properties may be a more crucial factor in determining emergent X-ray emission levels than bolometric luminosity.
  • Abriged version for astroph: The young late-type star V1118 Orionis was in outburst from 2005 to 2006. We followed the outburst with optical and near-infrared photometry; the X-ray emission was further probed with observations taken with XMM-Newton and Chandra during and after the outburst. In addition, we obtained mid-infrared photometry and spectroscopy with Spitzer at the peak of the outburst and in the post-outburst phase. The spectral energy distribution of V1118 Ori varied significantly over the course of the outburst. The optical flux showed the largest variations, most likely due to enhanced emission by a hot spot. The latter dominated the optical and near-infrared emission at the peak of the outburst, while the disk emission dominated in the mid-infrared. The X-ray flux correlated with the optical and infrared fluxes, indicating that accretion affected the magnetically active corona and the stellar magnetosphere. The thermal structure of the corona was variable with some indication of a cooling of the coronal temperature in the early phase of the outburst with a gradual return to normal values. Color-color diagrams in the optical and infrared showed variations during the outburst, with no obvious signature of reddening due to circumstellar matter. Using MC realizations of star+disk+hotspot models to fit the SED in ``quiescence'' and at the peak of the outburst, we determined that the mass accretion rate varied from about 2.5E-7 Msun/yr to 1E-6 Msun/yr; in addition the fractional area of the hotspot increased significantly as well. The multi-wavelength study of the V1118 Ori outburst helped us to understand the variations in spectral energy distributions and demonstrated the interplay between the disk and the stellar magnetosphere in a young, strongly accreting star.
  • We present results of a sensitive Chandra X-ray observation and Spitzer mid-IR observations of the infrared cluster lying north of the NGC 2071 reflection nebula in the Orion B molecular cloud. We focus on the dense cluster core known as NGC 2071-IR which contains at least nine IR sources within a 40 x 40 arcsecond region. This region shows clear signs of active star formation including powerful molecular outflows, Herbig-Haro objects, and both OH and H2O masers. We use Spitzer IRAC images to aid in X-ray source identification and to determine YSO classes using mid-IR colors. Spitzer IRAC colors show that the luminous source IRS 1 is a class I protostar. IRS 1 is believed to be driving a powerful bipolar molecular outflow and may be an embedded B-type star or its progenitor. Its X-ray spectrum reveals a fluorescent Fe emission line at 6.4 keV, arising in cold material near the protostar. The line is present even in the absence of large flares, raising questions about the nature of the ionizing mechanism responsible for producing the 6.4 keV fluorescent line. Chandra also detects X-ray sources at or near the positions of IRS 2, IRS 3, IRS 4, and IRS 6 and a variable X-ray source coincident with the radio source VLA 1, located just 2 arcsec north of IRS 1. No IR data are yet available to determine a YSO classification for VLA 1, but its high X-ray absorption shows that it is even more deeply-embedded than IRS 1, suggesting that it could be an even younger, less-evolved protostar.
  • We present the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and Keck observations of HDE 245059, a young weak-lined T Tauri star (WTTS), member of the pre-main sequence group in the Lambda Orionis Cluster. Our high spatial resolution, near-infrared observations with Keck reveal that HDE 245059 a binary separated by 0.87". Based on this new information we have obtained an estimate of the masses of the binary components; 3M_{sun} and 2.5M_{sun} for the north and south components, respectively. We have estimated the age of the system to be ~2-3 Myr. We detect both components of the binary in the zeroth order Chandra image and in the grating spectra. Our fits to the spectrum of the binary have shown that the emission is dominated by a plasma between 8 and 15 MK, a soft component at 4 MK and a hard component at 50 MK are also detected. The value of the hydrogen column density was low, 8 x 10^{19} cm^{-2}, likely due to the clearing of the inner region of the Lambda Orionis cloud. The abundance pattern shows an inverse First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect for all elements from O to Fe, the only exception being Ca. A 3-T model was fitted to the individual zeroth order spectra using the abundances derived for the binary. We have also obtained several lines fluxes from the grating spectra. The fits to the triplets show no evidence of high densities. We conclude that the X-ray properties of the weak-lined T Tau binary HDE 245059 are similar to those generally observed in other weak-lined T Tau stars. Although its accretion history may have been affected by the clearing of the interstellar material around Lambda Ori, its coronal properties appears not to have been strongly modified.
  • The variable star V1735 Cyg (= Elias 1-12) lies in the IC 5146 dark cloud and is a member of the class of FU Orionis objects whose dramatic optical brightenings are thought to be linked to episodic accretion. We report the first X-ray detections of V1735 Cyg and a deeply-embedded class I protostar lying 24 arcsecs to its northeast. X-ray spectra obtained with EPIC on XMM-Newton reveal very high-temperature plasma (kT > 5 keV) in both objects, but no large flares. Such hard X-ray emission is not anticipated from accretion shocks and is a signature of magnetic processes. We place these new results into the context of what is presently known about the X-ray properties of FU Orionis stars and other accreting young stellar objects.
  • We present results of a 90 ksec Chandra X-ray observation of the young sigma Orionis cluster (age ~3 Myr) obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. We use the high resolution grating spectrum and moderate resolution CCD spectrum of the massive central star sigma Ori AB (O9.5V + B0.5V) to test wind shock theories of X-ray emission and also analyze the high spatial resolution zero-order ACIS-S image of the central cluster region. Chandra detected 42 X-ray sources on the primary CCD (ACIS-S3). All but five have near-IR or optical counterparts and about one-fourth are variable. Notable high-mass stellar detections are sigma Ori AB, the magnetic B star sigma Ori E, and the B5V binary HD 37525. Most of the other detections have properties consistent with lower mass K or M-type stars. We present the first X-ray spectrum of the unusual infrared source IRS1 located 3.3 arc-sec north of sigma Ori AB, which is likely an embedded T Tauri star whose disk/envelope is being photoevaporated by sigma Ori AB. We focus on the radiative wind shock interpretation of the soft luminous X-ray emission from sigma Ori AB, but also consider possible alternatives including magnetically-confined wind shocks and colliding wind shocks. Its emission lines show no significant asymmetries or centroid shifts and are moderately broadened to HWHM ~ 264 km/s, or one-fourth the terminal wind speed. Forbidden lines in He-like ions are formally undetected, implying strong UV suppression. The Mg XI triplet forms in the wind acceleration zone within one stellar radius above the surface. These X-ray properties are consistent in several respects with the predictions of radiative wind shock theory for an optically thin wind, but explaining the narrow line widths presents a challenge to the theory.
  • Most stars form as members of large associations within dense, very cold (10-100 K) molecular clouds. The nearby giant molecular cloud in Orion hosts several thousand stars of ages less than a few million years, many of which are located in or around the famous Orion Nebula, a prominent gas structure illuminated and ionized by a small group of massive stars (the Trapezium). We present X-ray observations obtained with the X-ray Multi-Mirror satellite XMM-Newton revealing that a hot plasma with a temperature of 1.7-2.1 million K pervades the southwest extension of the nebula. The plasma, originating in the strong stellar winds from the Trapezium, flows into the adjacent interstellar medium. This X-ray outflow phenomenon must be widespread throughout our Galaxy.
  • We present results of a 20 ksec X-ray observation of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) binary system WR 147 obtained with XMM-Newton. Previous studies have shown that this system consists of a nitrogen-type WN8 star plus an OB companion whose winds are interacting to produce a colliding wind shock. X-ray spectra from the pn and MOS detectors confirm the high extinction reported from IR studies and reveal hot plasma including the first detection of the Fe K-alpha line complex at 6.67 keV. Spectral fits with a constant-temperature plane-parallel shock model give a shock temperature kT(shock) = 2.7 keV [T(shock) ~ 31 MK], close to but slightly hotter than the maximum temperature predicted for a colliding wind shock. Optically thin plasma models suggest even higher temperatures, which are not yet ruled out. The X-ray spectra are harder than can be accounted for using 2D numerical colliding wind shock models based on nominal mass-loss parameters. Possible explanations include: (i) underestimates of the terminal wind speeds or wind abundances, (ii) overly simplistic colliding wind models, or (iii) the presence of other X-ray emission mechanisms besides colliding wind shocks. Further improvement of the numerical models to include potentially important physics such as non-equilibrium ionization will be needed to rigorously test the colliding wind interpretation.
  • Two sensitive Chandra X-ray observations of the heavily-reddened galactic starburst cluster Westerlund 1 in May and June 2005 detected a previously unknown X-ray pulsar (CXO J164710.20-455217). Its slow 10.6 s pulsations, moderate X-ray temperature kT $\approx$ 0.5 keV, and apparent lack of a massive companion tentatively suggest that it is an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP). An isothermal blackbody model yields an acceptable spectral fit but the inferred source radius is much less than that of a neutron star, a result that has also been found for other AXPs. We analyze the X-ray spectra with more complex models including a model that assumes the pulsar is a strongly magnetized neutron star (``magnetar'') with a light element atmosphere. We conclude that the observed X-ray emission cannot be explained as global surface emission arising from the surface of a cooling neutron star or magnetar. The emission likely arises in one or more localized regions (``hot spots'') covering a small fraction of the surface. We discuss these new results in the context of both accretion and magnetar interpretations for the X-ray emission.
  • FU Orionis stars (FUors) are young low-mass eruptive stars that are thought to be accreting at high rates. They could give rise to soft X-ray emission from accretion shocks, but their X-ray properties are largely unknown. We report the first X-ray detection of the prototype star FU Orionis with XMM-Newton. Its X-ray spectrum is unusual compared to those of classical T Tauri stars (cTTS). The cool and hot components typically detected in cTTS are present but are seen through different absorption column densities. A heavily-absorbed hot component at kT > 5 keV accounts for most of the observed flux and a strong Fe K emission line is present. Such high temperatures are characteristic of magnetic processes rather than shock emission. We discuss possible origins of the unusual spectrum in the context of a complex physical environment that likely includes disk accretion, a strong wind, magnetic activity, and close binarity.
  • Recent optical and IR studies have revealed that the heavily-reddened starburst cluster Westerlund 1 (Wd 1) contains at least 22 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, comprising the richest WR population of any galactic cluster. We present results of a senstive Chandra X-ray observation of Wd 1 which detected 12 of the 22 known WR stars and the mysterious emission line star W9. The fraction of detected WN stars is nearly identical to that of WC stars. The WN stars WR-A and WR-B as well as W9 are exceptionally luminous in X-rays and have similar hard heavily-absorbed spectra with strong Si XIII and S XV emission lines. The luminous high-temperature X-ray emission of these three stars is characteristic of colliding wind binary systems but their binary status remains to be determined. Spectral fits of the X-ray bright sources WR-A and W9 with isothermal plane-parallel shock models require high absorption column densities log N$_{H}$ = 22.56 (cm$^{-2}$) and yield characteristic shock temperatures kT_shock ~ 3 keV (T ~ 35 MK).
  • We present evidence for an X-ray jet in the T Tau star DG Tau A based on Chandra ACIS data. DG Tau A, a jet-driving classical T Tau star with a flat infrared spectrum, reveals an unusual X-ray spectrum that requires two thermal components with different intervening absorption column densities. The softer component shows a low temperature of T \approx 2.9 MK, and its absorption is compatible with the stellar optical extinction (hydrogen column density N_H \approx 5x10^21 cm^-2). In contrast, the harder component reveals a temperature (22 MK) characteristic for active T Tau stars but its emission is more strongly absorbed (N_H \approx 2.8x10^22 cm^-2). Furthermore, the high-resolution ACIS-S image reveals a weak excess of soft (0.5-2 keV) counts at distances of 2-4" from the star precisely along the optical jet, with a suggestive concentration at 4" where a bow-shock-like structure has previously been identified in optical line observations. The energy distribution of these photons is similar to those of the stellar soft component. We interpret the soft spectral component as originating from shocks at the base of the jet, with shock heating continuing out to a distance of at least 500 AU along the jet, whereas the hard component is most likely coronal/magnetospheric as in other young stellar systems.
  • A 90 ks Chandra HETG observation of the young stellar cluster NGC 6193 in the southern Ara OB1 association detected 43 X-ray sources in a 2' x 2' core region centered on the young O stars HD 150135 (O6.5V) and HD 150136 (O3+O6V). The cluster is dominated by exceptionally bright X-ray emission from the two O stars, which are separated by only 10 arcsecs. The X-ray luminosity of HD 150136 is log Lx = 33.39 (ergs/s), making it one of the most luminous O-star X-ray sources known. All of the fainter X-ray sources in the core region have near-IR counterparts, but JHK photometry provides little evidence for near-IR excesses. These core sources have typical mean photon energies of 2 keV and about one-third are variable. It is likely that some are young low-mass stars in the cluster, but cluster membership remains to be determined. Grating spectra show that the X-ray properties of HD 150135 and HD 150136 are similar, but not identical. Both have moderately broadened unshifted emission lines and their emission is dominated by cool plasma, pointing to a wind shock origin. However, the emission of HD 150136 is slightly hotter and 4 times more luminous than its optical twin HD 150135. We discuss the possibility that a radiative colliding wind shock contributes to the prodigious X-ray output of the short-period (2.66 d) binary HD 150136. A surprising result is that the X-ray emission of HD 150136 is slowly variable on a timescale of less than one day. The origin of the variability is not yet known, but the observed behavior suggests that it is an occultation effect.
  • We present XMM-Newton observations of gamma^2 Velorum (WR 11, WC8+O7.5III, P = 78.53 d), a nearby Wolf-Ray binary system, at its X-ray high and low states. At high state, emission from a hot collisional plasma dominates from about 1 to 8 keV. At low state, photons between 1 and 4 keV are absorbed. The hot plasma is identified with the shock zone between the winds of the primary Wolf-Rayet star and the secondary O giant. The absorption at low state is interpreted as photoelectric absorption in the Wolf-Rayet wind. This absorption allows us to measure the absorbing column density and to derive a mass loss rate 8x10^{-6} M_sun/yr for the WC8 star. This mass loss rate, in conjunction with a previous Wolf-Rayet wind model, provides evidence for a clumped WR wind. A clumping factor of 16 is required. The X-ray spectra below 1 keV (12 Ang) show no absorption and are essentially similar in both states. There is a rather clear separation in that emission from a plasma hotter than 5 MK is heavily absorbed in low state while the cooler plasma is not. This cool plasma must come from a much more extended region than the hot material. The Neon abundance in the X-ray emitting material is 2.5 times the solar value. The unexpected detection of CV (25.3 Ang) and CVI (31.6 Ang) radiative recombination continua at both phases indicates the presence of a cool (~40,000 K) recombination region located far out in the binary system.
  • We present new X-ray and radio observations of the WR star EZ CMa (HD 50896) obtained with XMM-Newton and the VLA. This WN4 star shows optical/UV variability at a period of 3.76 d whose cause is unknown. VLA flux measurements at five frequencies show the radio spectral energy distribution is well-described by a power law with spectral index +0.69 (+-0.05), as expected for free-free wind emission. The derived ionized mass loss rate allowing for distance uncertainties is M(dot) = 3.8 (+-2.6)e-5 M_sun/yr. The CCD X-ray spectra show prominent Si XIII and S XV emission lines and can be acceptably modeled as an absorbed multi-temperature optically thin plasma. Nonsolar abundances are inferred with Fe notably deficient. The X-ray emission is dominated by cool plasma at kT_cool = 0.6 keV, but a harder component is also detected with a derived temperature kT_hot = 3.0 - 4.2 keV if the emission is thermal. This is too high to be explained by radiative wind shock models and the luminosity of the hard component is 3 orders of magnitude lower than expected for accretion onto a neutron star companion. We argue that the hard emission could be produced by the WR wind shocking onto a normal (nondegenerate) stellar companion at close separation. Using comparable data sets, we show that the X-ray and radio properties of EZ CMa are strikingly similar to those of the WN5-6 star WR110. This similarity points to common X-ray and radio emission processes in WN stars and discredits the idea that EZ CMa is anomalous within its class.
  • We analyze new high-resolution Chandra X-ray images of the Wolf-Rayet binary system WR147. This system contains a WN8 star with an early-type companion located 0.6'' to its north, and is the only known early-type binary with a separation on the sky large enough for the wind-wind collision between the stars to currently be resolved at X-ray energies. The 5 ksec Chandra HRC-I image provides the first direct evidence for spatially extended X-ray emission in an early-type binary system. The X-ray emission peaks close to the position of the radio bow shock and north of the WN8 star. A deeper X-ray image is needed to accurately determine the degree of spatial extension, to exactly align the X-ray and optical/radio frames, and to determine whether part of the detected X-ray emission arises in the individual stellar winds. Simulated X-ray images of the wind-wind collision have a FWHM consistent with the data, and maximum likelihood fits suggest that a deeper observation may also constrain the inclination and wind momentum ratio of this system. However, as the WR wind dominates the colliding wind X-ray emission it appears unlikely that the mass-loss rate and the terminal velocity of the companion wind can be separately determined from X-ray observations. We also note an inconsistency between numerical and analytical estimates of the X-ray luminosity ratio of the stronger and weaker wind components, and conclude that the analytical results are in error.