• Early observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) provide a unique probe of their progenitor systems and explosion physics. Here we report the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) discovery of an extraordinarily young SN Ia, iPTF 16abc. By fitting a power law to our early light curve, we infer that first light for the SN, that is when the SN could have first been detected by our survey, occurred only $0.15\pm_{0.07}^{0.15}$ days before our first detection. In the $\sim$24 hr after discovery, iPTF 16abc rose by $\sim$2 mag, featuring a near-linear rise in flux for $\gtrsim$3 days. Early spectra show strong C II absorption, which disappears after $\sim$7 days. Unlike the extensivelyobserved SN Ia SN 2011fe, the $(B-V)_0$ colors of iPTF 16abc are blue and nearly constant in the days after explosion. We show that our early observations of iPTF 16abc cannot be explained by either SN shock breakout and the associated, subsequent cooling or the SN ejecta colliding with a stellar companion. Instead, we argue that the early characteristics of iPTF 16abc, including (i) the rapid, near-linear rise, (ii) the nonevolving blue colors, and (iii) the strong C II absorption, are the result of either ejecta interaction with nearby, unbound material or vigorous mixing of radioactive $^{56}$Ni in the SN ejecta, or a combination of the two. In the next few years, dozens of very young \textit{normal} SNe Ia will be discovered, and observations similar to those presented here will constrain the white dwarf explosion mechanism.
  • We present basic data and modeling for a survey of the cool, photo-ionized Circum-Galactic Medium (CGM) of low-redshift galaxies using far-UV QSO absorption line probes. This survey consists of "targeted" and "serendipitous" CGM subsamples, originally described in Stocke et al. (2013, Paper 1). The targeted subsample probes low-luminosity, late-type galaxies at $z<0.02$ with small impact parameters ($\langle\rho\rangle = 71$ kpc), and the serendipitous subsample probes higher luminosity galaxies at $z\lesssim0.2$ with larger impact parameters ($\langle\rho\rangle = 222$ kpc). HST and FUSE UV spectroscopy of the absorbers and basic data for the associated galaxies, derived from ground-based imaging and spectroscopy, are presented. We find broad agreement with the COS-Halos results, but our sample shows no evidence for changing ionization parameter or hydrogen density with distance from the CGM host galaxy, probably because the COS-Halos survey probes the CGM at smaller impact parameters. We find at least two passive galaxies with H I and metal-line absorption, confirming the intriguing COS-Halos result that galaxies sometimes have cool gas halos despite no on-going star formation. Using a new methodology for fitting H I absorption complexes, we confirm the CGM cool gas mass of Paper 1, but this value is significantly smaller than found by the COS-Halos survey. We trace much of this difference to the specific values of the low-$z$ meta-galactic ionization rate assumed. After accounting for this difference, a best-value for the CGM cool gas mass is found by combining the results of both surveys to obtain $\log{(M/M_{\odot})}=10.5\pm0.3$, or ~30% of the total baryon reservoir of an $L \geq L^*$, star-forming galaxy.
  • We present post-cryogenic Spitzer imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 micron with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) of the Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey. SHELA covers $\sim$deg$^2$ of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey "Stripe 82" region, and falls within the footprints of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Dark Energy Survey. The HETDEX blind R $\sim$ 800 spectroscopy will produce $\sim$ 200,000 redshifts from the Lyman-$\alpha$ emission for galaxies in the range 1.9 < z < 3.5, and an additional $\sim$200,000 redshifts from the [OII] emission for galaxies at z < 0.5. When combined with deep ugriz images from the Dark Energy Camera, K-band images from NEWFIRM, and other ancillary data, the IRAC photometry from Spitzer will enable a broad range of scientific studies of the relationship between structure formation, galaxy stellar mass, halo mass, AGN, and environment over a co-moving volume of $\sim$0.5 Gpc$^3$ at 1.9 < z < 3.5. Here, we discuss the properties of the SHELA IRAC dataset, including the data acquisition, reduction, validation, and source catalogs. Our tests show the images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 $\mu$Jy at both 3.6 and 4.5 micron (1$\sigma$, for R=2 arcsec circular apertures). As a demonstration of science, we present IRAC number counts, examples of highly temporally variable sources, and galaxy surface density profiles of rich galaxy clusters. In the spirit of Spitzer Exploratory programs we provide all images and catalogs as part of the publication.
  • Molecular gas constitutes the dominant mass component of protoplanetary discs. To date, these sources have not been studied comprehensively at the longest far-infrared and shortest submillimetre wavelengths. This paper presents Herschel SPIRE FTS spectroscopic observations toward 18 protoplanetary discs, covering the entire 450-1540 GHz (666-195 $\mu$m) range at R~400-1300. The spectra reveal clear detections of the dust continuum and, in six targets, a significant amount of spectral line emission primarily attributable to $^{12}$CO rotational lines. Other targets exhibit little to no detectable spectral lines. Low signal-to-noise detections also include signatures from $^{13}$CO, [CI] and HCN. For completeness, we present upper limits of non-detected lines in all targets, including low-energy transitions of H2O and CH$^+$ molecules. The ten $^{12}$CO lines that fall within the SPIRE FTS bands trace energy levels of ~50-500 K. Combined with lower and higher energy lines from the literature, we compare the CO rotational line energy distribution with detailed physical-chemical models, for sources where these are available and published. Our 13CO line detections in the disc around Herbig Be star HD 100546 exceed, by factors of ~10-30, the values predicted by a model that matches a wealth of other observational constraints, including the SPIRE $^{12}$CO ladder. To explain the observed $^{12}$CO/$^{13}$CO ratio, it may be necessary to consider the combined effects of optical depth and isotope selective (photo)chemical processes. Considering the full sample of 18 objects, we find that the strongest line emission is observed in discs around Herbig Ae/Be stars, although not all show line emission. In addition, two of the six T Tauri objects exhibit detectable $^{12}$CO lines in the SPIRE range.
  • We derive the star formation history in four regions of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using the deepest VI color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) ever obtained for this galaxy. The images were obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope and are located at projected distances of 0.5-2 degrees from the SMC center, probing the main body and the wing of the galaxy. We derived the star-formation histories (SFH) of the four fields using two independent procedures to fit synthetic CMDs to the data. We compare the SFHs derived here with our earlier results for the SMC bar to create a deep pencil-beam survey of the global history of the central SMC. We find in all the six fields observed with HST a slow star formation pace from 13 to 5-7 Gyr ago, followed by a ~ 2-3 times higher activity. This is remarkable because dynamical models do not predict a strong influence of either the LMC or the Milky Way (MW) at that time. The level of the intermediate-age SFR enhancement systematically increases towards the center, resulting in a gradient in the mean age of the population, with the bar fields being systematically younger than the outer ones. Star formation over the most recent 500 Myr is strongly concentrated in the bar, the only exception being the area of the SMC wing. The strong current activity of the latter is likely driven by interaction with the LMC. At a given age, there is no significant difference in metallicity between the inner and outer fields, implying that metals are well mixed throughout the SMC. The age-metallicity relations we infer from our best fitting models are monotonically increasing with time, with no evidence of dips. This may argue against the major merger scenario proposed by Tsujimoto and Bekki 2009, although a minor merger cannot be ruled out.
  • We combine high-resolution HST/WFC3 images with multi-wavelength photometry to track the evolution of structure and activity of massive (log(M*) > 10) galaxies at redshifts z = 1.4 - 3 in two fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). We detect compact, star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) whose number densities, masses, sizes, and star formation rates qualify them as likely progenitors of compact, quiescent, massive galaxies (cQGs) at z = 1.5 - 3. At z > 2 most cSFGs have specific star-formation rates (sSFR = 10^-9 yr^-1) half that of typical, massive SFGs at the same epoch, and host X-ray luminous AGN 30 times (~30%) more frequently. These properties suggest that cSFGs are formed by gas-rich processes (mergers or disk-instabilities) that induce a compact starburst and feed an AGN, which, in turn, quench the star formation on dynamical timescales (few 10^8 yr). The cSFGs are continuously being formed at z = 2 - 3 and fade to cQGs by z = 1.5. After this epoch, cSFGs are rare, thereby truncating the formation of new cQGs. Meanwhile, down to z = 1, existing cQGs continue to enlarge to match local QGs in size, while less-gas-rich mergers and other secular mechanisms shepherd (larger) SFGs as later arrivals to the red sequence. In summary, we propose two evolutionary scenarios of QG formation: an early (z > 2), fast-formation path of rapidly-quenched cSFGs that evolve into cQGs that later enlarge within the quiescent phase, and a slow, late-arrival (z < 2) path for SFGs to form QGs without passing through a compact state.
  • The Bar is the most productive region of the Small Magellanic Cloud in terms of star formation but also the least studied one. In this paper we investigate the star formation history of two fields located in the SW and in the NE portion of the Bar using two independent and well tested procedures applied to the color-magnitude diagrams of their stellar populations resolved by means of deep HST photometry. We find that the Bar experienced a negligible star formation activity in the first few Gyr, followed by a dramatic enhancement from 6 to 4 Gyr ago and a nearly constant activity since then. The two examined fields differ both in the rate of star formation and in the ratio of recent over past activity, but share the very low level of initial activity and its sudden increase around 5 Gyr ago. The striking similarity between the timing of the enhancement and the timing of the major episode in the Large Magellanic Cloud is suggestive of a close encounter triggering star formation.
  • One of the conundrums in extragalactic astronomy is the discrepancy in observed metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) between the two prime stellar components of early-type galaxies-globular clusters (GCs) and halo field stars. This is generally taken as evidence of highly decoupled evolutionary histories between GC systems and their parent galaxies. Here we show, however, that new developments in linking the observed GC colors to their intrinsic metallicities suggest nonlinear color-to-metallicity conversions, which translate observed color distributions into strongly-peaked, unimodal MDFs with broad metal-poor tails. Remarkably, the inferred GC MDFs are similar to the MDFs of resolved field stars in nearby elliptical galaxies and those produced by chemical evolution models of galaxies. The GC MDF shape, characterized by a sharp peak with a metal-poor tail, indicates a virtually continuous chemical enrichment with a relatively short timescale. The characteristic shape emerges across three orders of magnitude in the host galaxy mass, suggesting a universal process of chemical enrichment among various GC systems. Given that GCs are bluer than field stars within the same galaxy, it is plausible that the chemical enrichment processes of GCs ceased somewhat earlier than that of field stellar population, and if so, GCs preferentially trace the major, vigorous mode of star formation events in galactic formation. We further suggest a possible systematic age difference among GC systems, in that the GC systems in more luminous galaxies are older. This is consistent with the downsizing paradigm of galaxies and supports additionally the similar nature shared by GCs and field stars. Our findings suggest that GC systems and their parent galaxies have shared a more common origin than previously thought, and hence greatly simplify theories of galaxy formation.
  • We present the properties of an extensive sample of molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) mapped at 11 pc resolution in the CO(1-0) line. We identify clouds as regions of connected CO emission, and find that the distributions of cloud sizes, fluxes and masses are sensitive to the choice of decomposition parameters. In all cases, however, the luminosity function of CO clouds is steeper than dN/dL \propto L^{-2}, suggesting that a substantial fraction of mass is in low-mass clouds. A correlation between size and linewidth, while apparent for the largest emission structures, breaks down when those structures are decomposed into smaller structures. We argue that the correlation between virial mass and CO luminosity is the result of comparing two covariant quantities, with the correlation appearing tighter on larger scales where a size-linewidth relation holds. The virial parameter (the ratio of a cloud's kinetic to self-gravitational energy) shows a wide range of values and exhibits no clear trends with the CO luminosity or the likelihood of hosting young stellar object (YSO) candidates, casting further doubt on the assumption of virialization for molecular clouds in the LMC. Higher CO luminosity increases the likelihood of a cloud harboring a YSO candidate, and more luminous YSOs are more likely to be coincident with detectable CO emission, confirming the close link between giant molecular clouds and massive star formation.
  • We use the multi-epoch, mid-infrared Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey to investigate the variability of 474,179 objects in 8.1 deg^2 of the NDWFS Bootes field. We perform a Difference Image Analysis of the four available epochs between 2004 and 2008, focusing on the deeper 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands. We find that 1.1% of the studied sample meet our standard selection criteria for being classed as a variable source. We require that the 3.6 and 4.5 micron light-curves are strongly correlated (r>0.8) and that their joint variance exceeds that for all sources with the same magnitude by 2 sigma. We then examine the mid-IR colors of the variable sources and match them with X-ray sources from the XBootes survey, radio catalogs, 24 micron-selected AGN candidates, and spectroscopically identified AGNs from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES). Based on their mid-IR colors, most of the variable sources are AGNs (76%), with smaller contributions from stars (11%), galaxies (6%), and unclassified objects. Most of the stellar, galaxy and unclassified sources are false positives. For our standard selection criteria, 11-12% of the mid-IR counterparts to X-ray sources, 24 micron-selected AGN candidates and spectroscopically identified AGNs show variability. Mid-IR AGN variability can be well described by a single power-law structure function with a power-law index of 0.5 at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns, and an amplitude of 0.1 mag on rest-frame time scales of 2 years. The variability amplitude is higher for shorter rest-frame wavelengths and lower luminosities. (Abridged)
  • Through the combination of high-order Adaptive Optics and coronagraphy, we report the discovery of a faint stellar companion to the A3V star zeta Virginis. This companion is ~7 magnitudes fainter than its host star in the H-band, and infrared imaging spanning 4.75 years over five epochs indicates this companion has common proper motion with its host star. Using evolutionary models, we estimate its mass to be 0.168+/-.016 solar masses, giving a mass ratio for this system q = 0.082. Assuming the two objects are coeval, this mass suggests a M4V-M7V spectral type for the companion, which is confirmed through integral field spectroscopic measurements. We see clear evidence for orbital motion from this companion and are able to constrain the semi-major axis to be greater than 24.9 AU, the period > 124$ yrs, and eccentricity > 0.16. Multiplicity studies of higher mass stars are relatively rare, and binary companions such as this one at the extreme low end of the mass ratio distribution are useful additions to surveys incomplete at such a low mass ratio. Moreover, the frequency of binary companions can help to discriminate between binary formation scenarios that predict an abundance of low-mass companions forming from the early fragmentation of a massive circumstellar disk. A system such as this may provide insight into the anomalous X-ray emission from A stars, hypothesized to be from unseen late-type stellar companions. Indeed, we calculate that the presence of this M-dwarf companion easily accounts for the X-ray emission from this star detected by ROSAT.
  • We introduce the SMC in space and time, a large coordinated space and ground-based program to study star formation processes and history, as well as variable stars, structure, kinematics and chemical evolution of the whole SMC. Here, we present the Colour-Magnitude Diagrams(CMDs) resulting from HST/ACS photometry, aimed at deriving the star formation history (SFH) in six fields of the SMC. The fields are located in the central regions, in the stellar halo, and in the wing toward the LMC. The CMDs are very deep, well beyond the oldest Main Sequence Turn-Off, and will allow us to derive the SFH over the entire Hubble time.
  • In recent papers Mannucci et al. (2005, 2006) suggested, on the basis of observational arguments, that there is a bimodal distribution of delay times for the explosion of Type Ia SNe. In this paper, we test this hypothesis in models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type: ellipticals, spirals and irregulars. We show that this proposed scenario is compatible also with the main chemical properties of galaxies. When the new rate is introduced in the two-infall model for the Milky Way, the derived Type Ia SN rate as a function of cosmic time shows a high and broad peak at very early epochs thus influencing the chemical evolution of the galactic halo more than in the previous widely adopted formulations for the SNIa rate. As a consequence of this, the [O/Fe] ratio decreases faster for [Fe/H] > -2.0 dex, relative to the old models. For a typical elliptical of 10^11 M_sun of luminous mass, the new rate produces average [alpha/ Fe] ratios in the dominant stellar population still in agreement with observations. The Type Ia SN rate also in this case shows an earlier peak and a subsequent faster decline relative to the previous results, but the differences are smaller than in the case of our Galaxy. We have also checked the effects of the new Type Ia SN rate on the evolution of the Fe content in the ICM, as a consequence of its production from cluster ellipticals and we found that less Fe in the ICM is produced with the new rate, due to the higher fraction of Fe synthesized at early times and remaining locked into the stars in ellipticals. For dwarf irregular galaxies suffering few bursts of star formation we obtain [O/Fe] ratios larger by 0.2 dex relative to the previous models.
  • We analyze extensive data on NGC1377 from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). Within the category of nascent starbursts, that we previously selected by their infrared to radio continuum ratios in large excess of the average and their hot dust, NGC1377 has the largest infrared excess yet measured. Optical imaging reveals a morphological distortion suggestive of a recent accretion event. Infrared spectroscopy reveals a compact and opaque source dominated by a hot, self-absorbed continuum (tau ~ 20 in the 10 micron silicate band). We provide physical evidence against non-stellar activity being the heating source. HII regions are detected through the single [NeII] line, probing <1% of the ionizing radiation. Not only is the optical depth very high, but >85% of ionizing photons are suppressed by dust. The only other detected emission features are molecular hydrogen lines, arguably excited mainly by shocks, besides photodissociation regions, and weak aromatic bands. The new observations support our interpretation in terms of an extremely young starburst (<1 Myr). More generally, galaxies deficient in radio synchrotron are likely observed within a few Myr of the onset of a starburst and after a long quiescence, prior to the replenishment of the ISM with cosmic rays. The similar infrared-radio properties of NGC1377 and some infrared-luminous galaxies suggest that NGC1377 constitutes an archetype to better understand starburst evolution. Although rare locally because observed in a brief evolutionary stage, nascent starbursts may represent a non-negligible fraction of merger-induced starbursts dominating deep infrared counts. Since they differ dramatically from usual starburst templates, they bear important consequences for the interpretation of deep surveys.
  • We present near-infrared K-band spectroscopy of 21 elliptical or cD Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs), for which we have measured the strength of the 2.293 micron CO stellar absorption feature. We find that the strength of this feature is remarkably uniform among these galaxies, with a smaller scatter in equivalent width than for the normal elliptical population in the field or clusters. The scatter for BCGs is 0.156 nm, compared with 0.240 nm for Coma cluster ellipticals, 0.337 nm for ellipticals from a variety of other clusters, and 0.422 nm for field ellipticals. We interpret this homogeneity as being due to a greater age, or more uniform history, of star formation in BCGs than in other ellipticals; only a small fraction of the scatter can be due to metallicity variations, even in the BCGs. Notwithstanding the small scatter, correlations are found between CO strength and various galaxy properties, including R-band absolute magnitude, which could improve the precision of these galaxies as distance indicators in measurements of cosmological parameters and velocity flows.
  • Results from an analysis of low resolution (R~250) near-IR long-slit spectra covering simultaneously the I, J, H, and K bands, for a sample of 15 Seyfert galaxies and the N5253 starburst nucleus, are presented. The Seyfert galaxies were selected as presenting `linear' or cone-like high excitation emission line in the optical, most probably due to the collimation of the central source's radiation by a dusty molecular torus. Our goal was to look for signatures of this torus, and to investigate the gaseous distribution, excitation and reddening. The IR emission lines are spatially extended in most cases, and we have used the [FeII]/Pa(beta) ratio as a measure of the gaseous excitation in Mrk573, N1386, and N7582. Values for this ratio between 1.5 and 6 are found, suggesting excitation of [FeII] by X-rays or shock waves in some regions. Nuclear Pa(beta) in N1365, and possibly nuclear Br(gama) in Mrk573, are broad. From analysis of the spatial distribution of the continuum (J-H) and (H-K) colours derived from our spectra, we find redder colours for the nucleus than the nearby bulge in most of the Seyfert 2s observed. Comparison with models including emission from dust and stars shows that hot (T~1000 K) dust emission dominates the nuclear continuum in N1365, N2110, N3281, N7582, and ESO362-G18. In N1386, N5643, and N5728 the main contributor is the underlying stellar population, combined with some foreground reddening and/or cool dust emission. In a few cases, the (J-H) colours on opposite sides of the nucleus differ by 0.3-0.8 mag, an effect that we interpret as partly due to differences in the local stellar population, and possibly extinction gradients.
  • High resolution ultraviolet spectra with HST-GHRS of two stars in the direction of the supergiant shell LMC4 unambiguously show absorption by substantial quantities of CIV gas at velocities near the the systemic velocity of the LMC. In combination with the detection of diffuse X-rays from the LMC4 by ROSAT and other supporting data, this demonstrates that the interior of LMC4 is filled with tenuous hot gas. CIV interstellar absorption is seen over a large velocity range, having at least 2 components at about 280 and 320 km/s. The strong component at 280 km/s has a width of 40 km/s and a column density in the order of 3 times 10^13 cm^-2. The width of the absorption is best explained by bulk motions of CIV-containing gas clouds inside LMC4. These hot clouds or layers around cold clouds have to have a relatively high filling factor inside LMC4 to fit the observations. The characteristics of the CIV gas component at 320 km/s are such that they trace a blast wave from a recent supernova within the LMC4 cavity. Galactic CIV absorption is also present, as to be expected for these lines of sight.