• A quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator is a novel two-dimensional quantum state of matter that features quantized Hall conductance in the absence of magnetic field, resulting from topologically protected dissipationless edge states that bridge the energy gap opened by band inversion and strong spin-orbit coupling. By investigating electronic structure of epitaxially grown monolayer 1T'-WTe2 using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we observe clear signatures of the topological band inversion and the band gap opening, which are the hallmarks of a QSH state. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements further confirm the correct crystal structure and the existence of a bulk band gap, and provide evidence for a modified electronic structure near the edge that is consistent with the expectations for a QSH insulator. Our results establish monolayer 1T'-WTe2 as a new class of QSH insulator with large band gap in a robust two-dimensional materials family of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs).
  • The valley degree of freedom in two-dimensional (2D) crystals recently emerged as a novel information carrier in addition to spin and charge. The intrinsic valley lifetime in 2D transition metal dichalcoginides (TMD) is expected to be remarkably long due to the unique spin-valley locking behavior, where the inter-valley scattering of electron requires simultaneously a large momentum transfer to the opposite valley and a flip of the electron spin. The experimentally observed valley lifetime in 2D TMDs, however, has been limited to tens of nanoseconds so far. Here we report efficient generation of microsecond-long lived valley polarization in WSe2/MoS2 heterostructures by exploiting the ultrafast charge transfer processes in the heterostructure that efficiently creates resident holes in the WSe2 layer. These valley-polarized holes exhibit near unity valley polarization and ultralong valley lifetime: we observe a valley-polarized hole population lifetime of over 1 us, and a valley depolarization lifetime (i.e. inter-valley scattering lifetime) over 40 us at 10 Kelvin. The near-perfect generation of valley-polarized holes in TMD heterostructures with ultralong valley lifetime, orders of magnitude longer than previous results, opens up new opportunities for novel valleytronics and spintronics applications.
  • Electrostatic confinement of charge carriers in graphene is governed by Klein tunneling, a relativistic quantum process in which particle-hole transmutation leads to unusual anisotropic transmission at pn junction boundaries. Reflection and transmission at these novel potential barriers should affect the quantum interference of electronic wavefunctions near these boundaries. Here we report the use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to map the electronic structure of Dirac fermions confined by circular graphene pn junctions. These effective quantum dots were fabricated using a new technique involving local manipulation of defect charge within the insulating substrate beneath a graphene monolayer. Inside such graphene quantum dots we observe energy levels corresponding to quasi-bound states and we spatially visualize the quantum interference patterns of confined electrons. Dirac fermions outside these quantum dots exhibit Friedel oscillation-like behavior. Bolstered with a theoretical model describing relativistic particles in a harmonic oscillator potential, our findings yield new insight into the spatial behavior of electrostatically confined Dirac fermions.
  • Nanoscale control of charge doping in two-dimensional (2D) materials permits the realization of electronic analogs of optical phenomena, relativistic physics at low energies, and technologically promising nanoelectronics. Electrostatic gating and chemical doping are the two most common methods to achieve local control of such doping. However, these approaches suffer from complicated fabrication processes that introduce contamination, change material properties irreversibly, and lack flexible pattern control. Here we demonstrate a clean, simple, and reversible technique that permits writing, reading, and erasing of doping patterns for 2D materials at the nanometer scale. We accomplish this by employing a graphene/boron nitride (BN) heterostructure that is equipped with a bottom gate electrode. By using electron transport and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate that spatial control of charge doping can be realized with the application of either light or STM tip voltage excitations in conjunction with a gate electric field. Our straightforward and novel technique provides a new path towards on-demand graphene pn junctions and ultra-thin memory devices.
  • Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) forms a quasicrystal whose structural and electronic properties depend on the angle of rotation between its layers. Here we present a scanning tunneling microscopy study of gate-tunable tBLG devices supported by atomically-smooth and chemically inert hexagonal boron nitride (BN). The high quality of these tBLG devices allows identification of coexisting moir\'e patterns and moir\'e super-superlattices produced by graphene-graphene and graphene-BN interlayer interactions. Furthermore, we examine additional tBLG spectroscopic features in the local density of states beyond the first van Hove singularity. Our experimental data is explained by a theory of moir\'e bands that incorporates ab initio calculations and confirms the strongly non-perturbative character of tBLG interlayer coupling in the small twist-angle regime.
  • Monolayer molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) is a promising two-dimensional direct-bandgap semiconductor with potential applications in atomically thin and flexible electronics. An attractive insulating substrate or mate for MoS2 (and related materials such as graphene) is hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Stacked heterostructures of MoS2 and h-BN have been produced by manual transfer methods, but a more efficient and scalable assembly method is needed. Here we demonstrate the direct growth of single- and few-layer MoS2 on h-BN by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, which is scalable with suitably structured substrates. The growth mechanisms for single-layer and few-layer samples are found to be distinct, and for single-layer samples low relative rotation angles (<5 degree) between the MoS2 and h-BN lattices prevail. Moreover, MoS2 directly grown on h-BN maintains its intrinsic 1.89 eV bandgap. Our CVD synthesis method presents an important advancement towards controllable and scalable MoS2 based electronic devices.
  • Defects play a key role in determining the properties of most materials and, because they tend to be highly localized, characterizing them at the single-defect level is particularly important. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has a history of imaging the electronic structure of individual point defects in conductors, semiconductors, and ultrathin films, but single-defect electronic characterization at the nanometer-scale remains an elusive goal for intrinsic bulk insulators. Here we report the characterization and manipulation of individual native defects in an intrinsic bulk hexagonal boron nitride (BN) insulator via STM. Normally, this would be impossible due to the lack of a conducting drain path for electrical current. We overcome this problem by employing a graphene/BN heterostructure, which exploits graphene's atomically thin nature to allow visualization of defect phenomena in the underlying bulk BN. We observe three different defect structures that we attribute to defects within the bulk insulating boron nitride. Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we obtain charge and energy-level information for these BN defect structures. In addition to characterizing such defects, we find that it is also possible to manipulate them through voltage pulses applied to our STM tip.