• The CP phases associated with the sterile neutrino cannot be measured in the dedicated short-baseline experiments being built to test the sterile neutrino hypothesis. On the other hand, these phases can be measured in long-baseline experiments, even though the main goal of these experiments is not to test or measure sterile neutrino parameters. In particular, the sterile neutrino phase $\delta_{24}$ affects the charged-current electron appearance data in long-baseline experiment. In this paper we show for the first time how well the sterile neutrino phase $\delta_{24}$ can be measured by the next-generation long-baseline experiments DUNE, T2HK (and T2HKK). We also show the expected precision with which this sterile phase can be measured by combining the DUNE data with data from T2HK or T2HKK. We also present the sensitivity of these experiments to the sterile mixing angles, both by themselves, as well as when DUNE is combined with T2HK or T2HKK.
  • We probe for evidence of invisible neutrino decay in the latest NOvA and T2K data. It is seen that both NOvA and T2K data sets are better fitted when one allows for invisible neutrino decay. We consider a scenario where only the third neutrino mass eigenstate $\nu_3$ is unstable and decays into invisible components. The best-fit value for the $\nu_3$ lifetime is obtained as $\tau_{3}/m_{3} = 3.16\times 10^{-12}$ s/eV from the analysis of the NOvA neutrino data and $\tau_{3}/m_{3} = 1.0\times 10^{-11}$ s/eV from the analysis of the T2K neutrino and anti-neutrino data. The combined analysis of NOvA and T2K gives $\tau_{3}/m_{3} = 5.01\times 10^{-12}$ s/eV as the best-fit lifetime. However, the statistical significance for this preference is weak with the no-decay hypothesis still allowed at close to 1.5$\sigma$ C.L. from the combined data sets, while the two experiment individually are consistent with no-decay even at the 1$\sigma$ C.L. At 3$\sigma$ C.L., the NOvA and T2K data give a lower limit on the neutrino lifetime of $\tau_{3}/m_{3}$ is $\tau_{3}/m_{3} \geq 7.22 \times 10^{-13}$ s/eV and $\tau_{3}/m_{3} \geq 1.41 \times 10^{-12}$ s/eV, respectively, while NOvA and T2K combined constrain $\tau_{3}/m_{3} \geq 1.50 \times 10^{-12}$ s/eV. We also show that in presence of decay the best-fit value in the $\sin^{2}\theta_{23}$ vs $\Delta m^{2}_{32}$ plane changes significantly and the allowed regions increase significantly towards higher $\sin^{2}\theta_{23}$.
  • The annihilation of Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMP) in the centre of the sun could give rise to neutrino fluxes. We study the prospects of searching for these neutrinos at the upcoming Iron CALorimeter (ICAL) detector to be housed at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We perform ICAL simulations to obtain the detector efficiencies and resolutions in order to simulate muon events in ICAL due to neutrinos coming from annihilation of WIMP in the mass range $m_\chi = (3-100)$ GeV. The atmospheric neutrinos pose a major background for these indirect detection studies and can be reduced using the fact that the signal comes only from the direction of the sun. For a given WIMP mass, we find the opening angle $\theta_{90}$ such that 90 \% of the signal events are contained within this angle and use this cone-cut criteria to reduce the atmospheric neutrino background. The reduced background is then weighted by the solar exposure function at INO to obtain the final background spectrum for a given WIMP mass. We perform a $\chi^2$ analysis and present expected exclusion regions in the $\sigma_{SD}-m_\chi$ and $\sigma_{SI}-m_\chi$, where $\sigma_{SD}$ and $\sigma_{SI}$ are the WIMP-nucleon Spin-Dependent (SD) and Spin-Independent (SI) scattering cross-section, respectively. For a 10 years exposure and $m_\chi=25$ GeV, the expected 90 \% C.L. exclusion limit is found to be $\sigma_{SD} < 6.87\times 10^{-41}$ cm$^2$ and $\sigma_{SI} < 7.75\times 10^{-43}$ cm$^2$ for the $\tau^{+} \tau^{-}$ annihilation channel and $\sigma_{SD} < 1.14\times 10^{-39}$ cm$^2$ and $\sigma_{SI} < 1.30\times 10^{-41}$ cm$^2$ for the $b~\bar b $ channel, assuming 100 \% branching ratio for each of the WIMP annihilation channel.
  • We propose a model which generates neutrino masses by the inverse seesaw mechanism, provides a viable dark matter candidate and explains the muon ($g-2$) anomaly. The Standard Model (SM) gauge group is extended with a gauged U(1)$_{\rm B-L}$ as well as a gauged U(1)$_{\rm L_{\mu} - L_{\tau}}$. While U(1)$_{\rm L_{\mu} - L_{\tau}}$ is anomaly free, the anomaly introduced by U(1)$_{\rm B-L}$ is cancelled between the six SM singlet fermions introduced for the inverse seesaw mechanism and four additional chiral fermions introduced in this model. After spontaneous symmetry breaking the four chiral fermionic degrees of freedom combine to give two Dirac states. The lightest Dirac fermion becomes stable and hence the dark matter candidate. We focus on the region of the parameter space where the dark matter annihilates to the right-handed neutrinos, relating the dark matter sector with the neutrino sector. The U(1)$_{\rm L_{\mu} - L_{\tau}}$ gauge symmetry provides a flavour structure to the inverse seesaw framework, successfully explaining the observed neutrino masses and mixings. We study the model parameters in the light of neutrino oscillation data and find correlation between them. Values of some of the model parameters are shown to be mutually exclusive between normal and inverted ordering of the neutrino mass eigenstates. Moreover, the muon ($g-2$) anomaly can be explained by the additional contribution arising from U(1)$_{\rm L_{\mu} - L_{\tau}}$ gauge boson.
  • It is well known that for the pure standard model triplet fermionic WIMP-type dark matter (DM), the relic density is satisfied around 2 TeV. For such a heavy mass particle, the production cross-section at 13 TeV run of LHC will be very small. Extending the model further with a singlet fermion and a triplet scalar, DM relic density can be satisfied for even much lower masses. The lower mass DM can be copiously produced at LHC and hence the model can be tested at collider. For the present model we have studied the multi jet ($\geq 2\,j$) + missing energy ($\cancel{E}_{T}$) signal and show that this can be detected in the near future of the LHC 13 TeV run. We also predict that the present model is testable by the earth based DM direct detection experiments like Xenon-1T and in future by Darwin.
  • We study the consequences of invisible decay of neutrinos in the context of the DUNE experiment. We assume that the third mass eigenstate is unstable and decays to a light sterile neutrino and a scalar or a pseudo-scalar. We consider DUNE running in 5 years neutrino and 5 years antineutrino mode and a detector volume of 40 kt. We obtain the bounds on the rest frame life time $\tau_3$ normalized to the mass $m_3$ as $\tau_3/m_3 > 4.50\times 10^{-11}$ s/eV at 90\% C.L. for a normal hierarchical mass spectrum. We also find that DUNE can discover neutrino decay for $\tau_3/m_3 > 4.27\times 10^{-11}$ s/eV at 90\% C.L. In addition, for an unstable $\nu_3$ with an illustrative value of $\tau_3/m_3$ = $1.2 \times 10^{-11}$ s/eV, the no decay case gets disfavoured at the $3\sigma$ C.L. At 90\% C.L. the allowed range for this true value is obtained as $1.71 \times 10^{-11} > \tau_3/m_3 > 9.29\times 10^{-12}$ in units of s/eV. We also study the correlation between a non-zero $\tau_3/m_3$ and standard oscillation parameters and find an interesting correlation in the appearance channel probability with the mixing angle $\theta_{23}$. This alters the octant sensitvity of DUNE, favorably (unfavorably) for true $\theta_{23}$ in the lower (higher) octant. The effect of a decaying neutrino does not alter the hierarchy or CP discovery sensitivity of DUNE in a discernible way.
  • We explain the existence of neutrino masses and their flavor structure, dark matter relic abundance and the observed 3.5 keV X-ray line within the framework of a gauged $U(1)_{L_{\mu} - L_{\tau}}$ extension of the "scotogenic" model. In the $U(1)_{L_{\mu} - L_{\tau}}$ symmetric limit, two of the the RH neutrinos are degenerate in mass, while the third is heavier. The $U(1)_{L_{\mu} - L_{\tau}}$ symmetry is broken spontaneously. Firstly, this breaks the $\mu-\tau$ symmetry in the light neutrino sector. Secondly, this results in mild splitting of the two degenerate RH neutrinos, with their mass difference given in terms of the $U(1)_{L_{\mu} - L_{\tau}}$ breaking parameter. Finally, we get a massive $Z_{\mu\tau}$ gauge boson. Due to the added $Z_2$ symmetry under which the RH neutrinos and the inert doublet are odd, the canonical Type-I seesaw is forbidden and the tiny neutrino masses are generated radiatively at one loop. The same $Z_2$ symmetry also ensures that the lightest RH neutrino is stable and the other two can only decay into the lightest one. This makes the two nearly-degenerate lighter neutrinos a two-component dark matter, which in our model are produced by the freeze-in mechanism via the decay of the $Z_{\mu\tau}$ gauge boson in the early universe. We show that the next-to-lightest RH neutrino has a very long lifetime and decays into the lightest one at the present epoch explaining the observed 3.5 keV line.
  • Sensitivity of the magnetised Iron CALorimeter (ICAL) detector at the proposed India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) to invisible decay of the mass eigenstate $\nu_3$ using atmospheric neutrinos is explored. A full three-generation analysis including earth matter effects is performed in a framework with both decay and oscillations. The wide energy range and baselines offered by atmospheric neutrinos are shown to be excellent for constraining the $\nu_3$ lifetime. We find that with an exposure of 500 kton-yr the ICAL atmospheric experiment could constrain the $\nu_3$ lifetime to $\tau_3/m_3>1.51\times10^{-10}$ s/eV at the 90\% C.L. This is two orders of magnitude tighter than the bound from MINOS. The effect of invisible decay on the precision measurement of $\theta_{23}$ and $|\Delta{m^2_{32}}|$ is also studied.
  • We evaluate the impact of sterile neutrino oscillations in the so-called 3+1 scenario on the proposed long baseline experiment in USA and Japan. There are two proposals for the Japan experiment which are called T2HK and T2HKK. We show the impact of sterile neutrino oscillation parameters on the expected sensitivity of T2HK and T2HKK to mass hierarchy, CP violation and octant of $\theta_{23}$ and compare it against that expected in the case of standard oscillations. We add the expected ten years data from DUNE and present the combined expected sensitivity of T2HKK+DUNE to the oscillation parameters. We do a full marginalisation over the relevant parameter space and show the effect of the magnitude of the true sterile mixing angles on the physics reach of these experiments. We show that if one assumes that the source of CP violation is the standard CP phase alone in the test case, then it appears that the expected CP violation sensitivity decreases due to sterile neutrinos. However, if we give up this assumption, then the CP sensitivity could go in either direction. The impact on expected octant of $\theta_{23}$ and mass hierarchy sensitivity is shown to depend on the magnitude of the sterile mixing angles in a nontrivial way.
  • We discuss inflation and dark matter in the inert doublet model coupled non-minimally to gravity where the inert doublet is the inflaton and the neutral scalar part of the doublet is the dark matter candidate. We calculate the various inflationary parameters like $n_s$, $r$ and $P_s$ and then proceed to the reheating phase where the inflaton decays into the Higgs and other gauge bosons which are non-relativistic owing to high effective masses. These bosons further decay or annihilate to give relativistic fermions which are finally responsible for reheating the universe. At the end of the reheating phase, the inert doublet which was the inflaton enters into thermal equilibrium with the rest of the plasma and its neutral component later freezes out as cold dark matter with a mass of about 2 TeV.
  • The study has been carried out on the prospects of probing the sterile neutrino mixing with the magnetized Iron CALorimeter (ICAL) at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO), using atmospheric neutrinos as a source. The so-called 3~$+$~1 scenario is considered for active-sterile neutrino mixing and lead to projected exclusion curves in the sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle plane. The analysis is performed using the neutrino event generator NUANCE, modified for ICAL, and folded with the detector resolutions obtained by the INO collaboration from a full GEANT4 based detector simulation. A comparison has been made between the results obtained from the analysis considering only the energy and zenith angle of the muon and combined with the hadron energy due to the neutrino induced event. A small improvement has been observed with the addition of the hadron information to the muon. In the analysis we consider neutrinos coming from all zenith angles and the Earth matter effects are also included. The inclusion of events from all zenith angles improves the sensitivity to sterile neutrino mixing by about 35$\%$ over the result obtained using only down-going events. The improvement mainly stems from the impact of Earth matter effects on active-sterile mixing. The expected precision of ICAL on the active-sterile mixing is explored and allowed confidence level (C.L.) contours presented. At the assumed true value of $10^\circ$ for the sterile mixing angles and marginalization over $\Delta m^2_{41}$ and the sterile mixing angles, the upper bound at 90\% C.L. (from 2 parameter plots) is around $20^\circ$ for $\theta_{14}$ and $\theta_{34}$, and about $12^\circ$ for $\theta_{24}$.
  • The ICAL Collaboration: Shakeel Ahmed, M. Sajjad Athar, Rashid Hasan, Mohammad Salim, S. K. Singh, S. S. R. Inbanathan (The American College), Venktesh Singh, V. S. Subrahmanyam, Shiba Prasad Behera, Vinay B. Chandratre, Nitali Dash, Vivek M. Datar, V. K. S. Kashyap, Ajit K. Mohanty, Lalit M. Pant, Animesh Chatterjee, Sandhya Choubey, Raj Gandhi, Anushree Ghosh, Deepak Tiwari (HRI, Allahabad), Ali Ajmi, S. Uma Sankar, Prafulla Behera, Aleena Chacko, Sadiq Jafer, James Libby, K. Raveendrababu, K. R. Rebin, D. Indumathi, K. Meghna, S. M. Lakshmi, M. V. N. Murthy, Sumanta Pal, G. Rajasekaran, Nita Sinha, Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla, Amina Khatun, Poonam Mehta, Vipin Bhatnagar, R. Kanishka, A. Kumar, J. S. Shahi, J. B. Singh, Monojit Ghosh, Pomita Ghoshal, Srubabati Goswami, Chandan Gupta, Sushant Raut, Sudeb Bhattacharya, Suvendu Bose, Ambar Ghosal, Abhik Jash, Kamalesh Kar, Debasish Majumdar, Nayana Majumdar, Supratik Mukhopadhyay, Satyajit Saha (Saha Inst. Nucl. Phys., Kolkata), B. S. Acharya, Sudeshna Banerjee, Kolahal Bhattacharya, Sudeshna Dasgupta, Moon Moon Devi, Amol Dighe, Gobinda Majumder, Naba K. Mondal, Asmita Redij, Deepak Samuel, B. Satyanarayana, Tarak Thakore, C. D. Ravikumar, A. M. Vinodkumar, Gautam Gangopadhyay, Amitava Raychaudhuri, Brajesh C. Choudhary, Ankit Gaur, Daljeet Kaur, Ashok Kumar, Sanjeev Kumar, Md. Naimuddin, Waseem Bari, Manzoor A. Malik, S. Krishnaveni, H. B. Ravikumar, C. Ranganathaiah, Saikat Biswas, Subhasis Chattopadhyay, Rajesh Ganai, Tapasi Ghosh, Y. P. Viyogi
    May 9, 2017 hep-ph, hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies and path lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial to address some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations. We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected response of the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substantially. Its charge identification capability, and hence its ability to distinguish neutrinos from antineutrinos, makes it an efficient detector for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy. In this report, we outline the analyses carried out for the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and precision measurements of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters at ICAL, and give the expected physics reach of the detector with 10 years of runtime. We also explore the potential of ICAL for probing new physics scenarios like CPT violation and the presence of magnetic monopoles.
  • The Standard Model (SM) is unable to explain the origin of tiny neutrino masses, dark matter and matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. In this work, we propose a model that can address all these three observations. Our model extends the SM by a local U$(1)_{\rm B-L}$ gauge symmetry, three right-handed (RH) neutrinos to cancel the gauge anomalies, and two scalars, one of which is charged under U$(1)_{\rm B-L}$ while the other is not. The U$(1)_{\rm B-L}$ symmetry is broken spontaneously when the scalar charged under this gauge group picks up a VEV. This results in making both the additional neutral gauge boson as well as the RH neutrinos massive. The light neutrino masses can be generated easily in this model by the Type I seesaw mechanism. Here we consider phenomenologically interesting TeV scale RH Majorana neutrinos and two of them are nearly degenerate, which allows us to generate a lepton asymmetry via resonant leptogenesis. This lepton asymmetry is converted to the baryon asymmetry through sphaleron processes allowing us to correctly reproduce the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. Finally, the second new scalar which is neutral under the SM as well as U$(1)_{\rm B-L}$ gauge group is made stable by adding a $\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry. We show that this particle can easily play the role of the dark matter of the Universe. Null results from direct detection experiments force us to think about the beyond thermal WIMP scenario. Thus, we consider our dark matter candidate to be very feebly interacting with the cosmic soup and hence it is called the FIMP which never attains thermal equilibrium. We study in detail the production of the dark matter via freeze-in mechanism before and after electroweak symmetry breaking and use the observed dark matter relic abundance to put constraints on relevant model parameters.
  • The tightening of the constraints on the standard thermal WIMP scenario has forced physicists to propose alternative dark matter (DM) models. One of the most popular alternate explanations of the origin of DM is the non-thermal production of DM via freeze-in. In this scenario the DM never attains thermal equilibrium with the thermal soup because of its feeble coupling strength ($\sim 10^{-12}$) with the other particles in the thermal bath and is generally called the Feebly Interacting Massive Particle (FIMP). In this work, we present a gauged U(1)$_{L_{\mu}-L_{\tau}}$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) which has a scalar FIMP DM candidate and can consistently explain the DM relic density bound. In addition, the spontaneous breaking of the U(1)$_{L_{\mu}-L_{\tau}}$ gauge symmetry gives an extra massive neutral gauge boson $Z_{\mu\tau}$ which can explain the muon ($g-2$) data through its additional one-loop contribution to the process. Lastly, presence of three right-handed neutrinos enable the model to successfully explain the small neutrino masses via the Type-I seesaw mechanism. The presence of the spontaneously broken U(1)$_{L_{\mu}-L_{\tau}}$ gives a particular structure to the light neutrino mass matrix which can explain the peculiar mixing pattern of the light neutrinos.
  • DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) is a proposed long-baseline neutrino experiment in the US with a baseline of 1300 km from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) to Sanford Underground Research Facility, which will house a 40 kt Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) as the far detector. The experiment will also have a fine grained near detector for accurately measuring the initial fluxes. We show that the energy range of the fluxes and baseline of the DUNE near detector is conducive for observing $\nu_\mu \to \nu_e$ oscillations of $\Delta m^2 \sim$ eV$^2$ scale sterile neutrinos, and hence can be effectively used for testing to very high accuracy the reported oscillation signal seen by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments. We study the sensitivity of the DUNE near detector to sterile neutrino oscillations by varying the baseline, detector fiducial mass and systematic uncertainties. We find that the detector mass and baseline of the currently proposed near detector at DUNE will be able to test the entire LSND parameter region with good precision. The dependence of sensitivity on baseline and detector mass is seen to give interesting results, while dependence on systematic uncertainties is seen to be small.
  • The observation of neutrino masses, mixing and the existence of dark matter are amongst the most important signatures of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). In this paper, we propose to extend the SM by a local $L_\mu - L_\tau$ gauge symmetry, two additional complex scalars and three right-handed neutrinos. The $L_\mu - L_\tau$ gauge symmetry is broken spontaneously when one of the scalars acquires a vacuum expectation value. The $L_\mu - L_\tau$ gauge symmetry is known to be anomaly free and can explain the beyond SM measurement of the anomalous muon $({\rm g-2})$ through additional contribution arising from the extra $Z_{\mu\tau}$ mediated diagram. Small neutrino masses are explained naturally through the Type-I seesaw mechanism, while the mixing angles are predicted to be in their observed ranges due to the broken $L_\mu-L_\tau$ symmetry. The second complex scalar is shown to be stable and becomes the dark matter candidate in our model. We show that while the $Z_{\mu\tau}$ portal is ineffective for the parameters needed to explain the anomalous muon $({\rm g-2})$ data, the correct dark matter relic abundance can easily be obtained from annihilation through the Higgs portal. Annihilation of the scalar dark matter in our model can also explain the Galactic Centre gamma ray excess observed by Fermi-LAT. We show the predictions of our model for future direct detection experiments and neutrino oscillation experiments.
  • In this work, we have considered a gauged $U(1)_{\rm B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) with three right handed neutrinos for anomaly cancellation and two additional SM singlet complex scalars with non-trivial B-L charges. One of these is used to spontaneously break the $U(1)_{\rm B-L}$ gauge symmetry, leading to Majorana masses for the neutrinos through the standard Type I seesaw mechanism, while the other becomes the dark matter (DM) candidate in the model. We test the viability of the model to simultaneously explain the DM relic density observed in the CMB data as well as the Galactic Centre (GC) $\gamma$-ray excess seen by Fermi-LAT. We show that for DM masses in the range 40-55 GeV and for a wide range of $U(1)_{\rm B-L}$ gauge boson masses, one can satisfy both these constraints if the additional neutral Higgs scalar has a mass around the resonance region. In studying the dark matter phenomenology and GC excess, we have taken into account theoretical as well as experimental constraints coming from vacuum stability condition, PLANCK bound on DM relic density, LHC and LUX and present allowed areas in the model parameter space consistent with all relevant data, calculate the predicted gamma ray flux from the GC and discuss the related phenomenology.
  • We simultaneously investigate source, detector and matter non-standard neutrino interactions at the proposed DUNE experiment. Our analysis is performed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo exploring the full parameter space. We find that the sensitivity of DUNE to the standard oscillation parameters is worsened due to the presence of non-standard neutrino interactions. In particular, there are degenerate solutions in the leptonic mixing angle $\theta_{23}$ and the Dirac CP-violating phase $\delta$. We also compute the expected sensitivities at DUNE to the non-standard interaction parameters. We find that the sensitivities to the matter non-standard interaction parameters are substantially stronger than the current bounds (up to a factor of about 15). Furthermore, we discuss correlations between the source/detector and matter non-standard interaction parameters and find a degenerate solution in $\theta_{23}$. Finally, we explore the effect of statistics on our results.
  • We present an overview of the current status of neutrino oscillation studies at atmospheric neutrino experiments. While the current data gives some tentalising hints regarding the neutrino mass hierarchy, octant of $\theta_{23}$ and $\delta_{CP}$, the hints are not statistically significant. We summarise the sensitivity to these sub-dominant three-generation effects from the next-generation proposed atmospheric neutrino experiments. We next present the prospects of new physics searches such as non-standard interactions, sterile neutrinos and CPT violation studies at these experiments.
  • We investigate source and detector non-standard neutrino interactions at the proposed ESS$\nu$SB experiment. We analyze the effect of non-standard physics at the probability level, the event-rate level and by a full computation of the ESS$\nu$SB setup. We find that the precision measurement of the leptonic mixing angle $\theta_{23}$ at ESS$\nu$SB is robust in the presence of non-standard interactions, whereas that of the leptonic CP-violating phase $\delta$ is worsened at most by a factor of two. We compute sensitivities to all the relevant source and decector non-standard interaction parameters and find that the sensitivities to the parameters $\varepsilon^s_{\mu e}$ and $\varepsilon^d_{\mu e}$ are comparable to the existing limits in a realistic scenario, while they improve by a factor of two in an optimistic scenario. Finally, we show that the absence of a near detector compromises the sensitivity of ESS$\nu$SB to non-standard interactions.
  • Non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) involved in neutrino propagation inside Earth matter could potentially alter atmospheric neutrino fluxes. In this work, we look at the impact of these NSI on the signal at the ICAL detector to be built at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We show how the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy of ICAL changes in the presence of NSI. The mass hierarchy sensitivity is shown to be rather sensitive to the NSI parameters $\epsilon_{e\mu}$ and $\epsilon_{e\tau}$, while the dependence on $\epsilon_{\mu\tau}$ and $\epsilon_{\tau\tau}$ is seen to be very mild, once the $\chi^2$ is marginalised over oscillation and NSI parameters. If the NSI are large enough, the event spectrum at ICAL is expected to be altered and this can be used to discover new physics. We calculate the lower limit on NSI parameters above which ICAL could discover NSI at a given C.L. from 10 years of data. If NSI were too small, the null signal at ICAL can constrain the NSI parameters. We give upper limits on the NSI parameters at any given C.L. that one is expected to put from 10 years of running of ICAL. Finally, we give C.L. contours in the NSI parameter space that is expected to be still allowed from 10 years of running of the experiment.
  • We report on a detailed simulation study of the hadron energy resolution as a function of the thickness of the absorber plates for the proposed Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We compare the hadron resolutions obtained with absorber thicknesses in the range 1.5--8 cm for neutrino interactions in the energy range 2--15 GeV, which is relevant to hadron production in atmospheric neutrino interactions. We find that at lower energies, the thickness dependence of energy resolution is steeper than at higher energies, however there is a thickness-independent contribution that dominates at the lower thicknesses discussed in this work. As a result, the gain in hadron energy resolution with decreasing plate thickness is marginal. We present the results in the form of fits to a function with energy-dependent exponent.
  • A high-power neutrino superbeam experiment at the ESS facility has been proposed such that the source-detector distance falls at the second oscillation maximum, giving very good sensitivity towards establishing CP violation. In this work, we explore the comparative physics reach of the experiment in terms of leptonic CP-violation, precision on atmospheric parameters, non-maximal theta23, and its octant for a variety of choices for the baselines. We also vary the neutrino vs. the anti-neutrino running time for the beam, and study its impact on the physics goals of the experiment. We find that for the determination of CP violation, 540 km baseline with 7 years of neutrino and 3 years of anti-neutrino (7nu+3nubar) run-plan performs the best and one expects a 5sigma sensitivity to CP violation for 48% of true values of deltaCP. The projected reach for the 200 km baseline with 7nu+3nubar run-plan is somewhat worse with 5sigma sensitivity for 34% of true values of deltaCP. On the other hand, for the discovery of a non-maximal theta23 and its octant, the 200 km baseline option with 7nu+3nubar run-plan performs significantly better than the other baselines. A 5sigma determination of a non-maximal theta23 can be made if the true value of sin^2theta23 lesssim 0.45 or sin^2theta23 gtrsim 0.57. The octant of theta23 could be resolved at 5sigma if the true value of sin^2theta23 lesssim 0.43 or gtrsim 0.59, irrespective of deltaCP.
  • We investigate the impact of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSIs) on atmospheric neutrinos using the proposed PINGU experiment. In particular, we focus on the matter NSI parameters $\varepsilon_{\mu\tau}$ and $|\varepsilon_{\tau\tau} - \varepsilon_{\mu\mu}|$ that have previously been constrained by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. First, we present approximate analytical formulas for the difference of the muon neutrino survival probability with and without the above-mentioned NSI parameters. Second, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino events at PINGU in the energy range (2-100) GeV, which follow the trend outlined on probability level. Finally, we perform a statistical analysis of PINGU. Using three years of data, we obtain bounds from PINGU given by $-0.0043~(-0.0048) < \varepsilon_{\mu\tau} < 0.0047~(0.0046)$ and $-0.03~(-0.016) < \varepsilon_{\tau\tau} < 0.017~(0.032)$ at 90 % confidence level for normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, which improve the Super-Kamiokande bounds by one order of magnitude. In addition, we show the expected allowed contour region in the $\varepsilon_{\mu\tau}$-$\varepsilon_{\tau\tau}$ plane if NSIs exist in Nature and the result suggests that there is basically no correlation between $\varepsilon_{\mu\tau}$ and $\varepsilon_{\tau\tau}$.
  • The results of a Monte Carlo simulation study of the hadron energy response for the magnetized Iron CALorimeter detector, ICAL, proposed to be located at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is presented. Using a GEANT4 modeling of the detector ICAL, interactions of atmospheric neutrinos with target nuclei are simulated. The detector response to hadrons propagating through it is investigated using the hadron hit multiplicity in the active detector elements. The detector response to charged pions of fixed energy is studied first, followed by the average response to the hadrons produced in atmospheric neutrino interactions using events simulated with the NUANCE event generator. The shape of the hit distribution is observed to fit the Vavilov distribution, which reduces to a Gaussian at high energies. In terms of the parameters of this distribution, we present the hadron energy resolution as a function of hadron energy, and the calibration of hadron energy as a function of the hit multiplicity. The energy resolution for hadrons is found to be in the range 85% (for 1GeV) -- 36% (for 15 GeV).