• This report records and discusses the Fourth Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE4). The report includes a description of the keynote presentation of the workshop, the mission and vision statements that were drafted at the workshop and finalized shortly after it, a set of idea papers, position papers, experience papers, demos, and lightning talks, and a panel discussion. The main part of the report covers the set of working groups that formed during the meeting, and for each, discusses the participants, the objective and goal, and how the objective can be reached, along with contact information for readers who may want to join the group. Finally, we present results from a survey of the workshop attendees.
  • This report records and discusses the Third Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE3). The report includes a description of the keynote presentation of the workshop, which served as an overview of sustainable scientific software. It also summarizes a set of lightning talks in which speakers highlighted to-the-point lessons and challenges pertaining to sustaining scientific software. The final and main contribution of the report is a summary of the discussions, future steps, and future organization for a set of self-organized working groups on topics including developing pathways to funding scientific software; constructing useful common metrics for crediting software stakeholders; identifying principles for sustainable software engineering design; reaching out to research software organizations around the world; and building communities for software sustainability. For each group, we include a point of contact and a landing page that can be used by those who want to join that group's future activities. The main challenge left by the workshop is to see if the groups will execute these activities that they have scheduled, and how the WSSSPE community can encourage this to happen.
  • Novel technologies in genomics allow creating data in exascale dimension with relatively minor effort of human and laboratory and thus monetary resources compared to capabilities only a decade ago. While the availability of this data salvage to find answers for research questions, which would not have been feasible before, maybe even not feasible to ask before, the amount of data creates new challenges, which obviously need new software and data management systems. Such new solutions have to consider integrative approaches, which are not only considering the effectiveness and efficiency of data processing but improve reusability, reproducibility and usability especially tailored to the target user communities of genomic big data. In our opinion, current solutions tackle part of the challenges and have each their strengths but lack to provide a complete solution. We present in this paper the key challenges and the characteristics cutting-edge developments should possess for fulfilling the needs of the user communities to allow for seamless sharing and data analysis on a large scale.
  • The Grid and Cloud User Support Environment (gUSE) enables users convenient and easy access to grid and cloud infrastructures by providing a general purpose, workflow-oriented graphical user interface to create and run workflows on various Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCIs). Its arrangements for creating and modifying existing workflows are, however, non-intuitive and cumbersome due to the technologies and architecture employed by gUSE. In this paper, we outline the first integrated web-based workflow editor for gUSE with the aim of improving the user experience for those with industrial data workflows and the wider gUSE community. We report initial assessments of the editor's utility based on users' feedback. We argue that combining access to diverse scalable resources with improved workflow creation tools is important for all big data applications and research infrastructures.