• Gas-rich minor mergers contribute significantly to the gas reservoir of early-type galaxies (ETGs) at low redshift, yet the star formation efficiency (SFE; the star formation rate divided by the molecular gas mass) appears to be strongly suppressed following some of these events, in contrast to the more well-known merger-driven starbursts. We present observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of six ETGs, which have each recently undergone a gas-rich minor merger, as evidenced by their disturbed stellar morphologies. These galaxies were selected because they exhibit extremely low SFEs. We use the resolving power of ALMA to study the morphology and kinematics of the molecular gas. The majority of our galaxies exhibit spatial and kinematical irregularities, such as detached gas clouds, warps, and other asymmetries. These asymmetries support the interpretation that the suppression of the SFE is caused by dynamical effects stabilizing the gas against gravitational collapse. Through kinematic modelling we derive high velocity dispersions and Toomre Q stability parameters for the gas, but caution that such measurements in edge-on galaxies suffer from degeneracies. We estimate merger ages to be about 100~Myr based on the observed disturbances in the gas distribution. Furthermore, we determine that these galaxies lie, on average, two orders of magnitude below the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation for star-forming galaxies as well as below the relation for relaxed ETGs. We discuss potential dynamical processes responsible for this strong suppression of star formation surface density at fixed molecular gas surface density.
  • The protoplanetary disk around HL Tau is so far the youngest candidate of planet formation, and it is still embedded in a protostellar envelope with a size of thousands of au. In this work, we study the gas kinematics in the envelope and its possible influence on the embedded disk. We present our new ALMA cycle 3 observational results of HL Tau in the 13CO (2-1) and C18O (2-1) emission at resolutions of 0.8" (110 au), and we compare the observed velocity pattern with models of different kinds of gas motions. Both the 13CO and C18O emission lines show a central compact component with a size of 2" (280 au), which traces the protoplanetary disk. The disk is clearly resolved and shows a Keplerian motion, from which the protostellar mass of HL Tau is estimated to be 1.8+/-0.3 M$_\odot$, assuming the inclination angle of the disk to be 47 deg from the plane of the sky. The 13CO emission shows two arc structures with sizes of 1000-2000 au and masses of 3E-3 M$_\odot$ connected to the central disk. One is blueshifted and stretches from the northeast to the northwest, and the other is redshifted and stretches from the southwest to the southeast. We find that simple kinematical models of infalling and (counter-)rotating flattened envelopes cannot fully explain the observed velocity patterns in the arc structures. The gas kinematics of the arc structures can be better explained with three-dimensional infalling or outflowing motions. Nevertheless, the observed velocity in the northwestern part of the blueshifted arc structure is ~60-70% higher than the expected free-fall velocity. We discuss two possible origins of the arc structures: (1) infalling flows externally compressed by an expanding shell driven by XZ Tau and (2) outflowing gas clumps caused by gravitational instabilities in the protoplanetary disk around HL Tau.
  • We search for the gamma-ray counterparts of stellar-mass black holes using long-term Fermi archive to investigate the electrostatic acceleration of electrons and positrons in the vicinity of the event horizon, by applying the pulsar outer-gap model to their magnetosphere. When a black hole transient (BHT) is in a low-hard or quiescent state, the radiatively inefficient accretion flow cannot emit enough MeV photons that are required to sustain the force-free magnetosphere in the polar funnel via two-photon collisions. In this charge-starved gap region, an electric field arises along the magnetic field lines to accelerate electrons and positrons into ultra-relativistic energies. These relativistic leptons emit copious gamma-rays via the curvature and inverse-Compton (IC) processes. It is found that these gamma-ray emissions exhibit a flaring activity when the plasma accretion rate stays typically between 0.01 and 0.005 percent of the Eddington value for rapidly rotating, stellar-mass black holes. By analyzing the detection limit determined from archival Fermi/LAT data, we find that the 7-year averaged duty cycle of such flaring activities should be less than 5% and 10% for XTE J1118+480 and 1A 0620-00, respectively, and that the detection limit is comparable to the theoretical prediction for V404 Cyg. It is predicted that the gap emission can be discriminated from the jet emission, if we investigate the high-energy spectral behaviour or observe nearby BHTs during deep quiescence simultaneously in infrared wavelength and very-high energies.
  • We investigate the acceleration of electrons and positrons by magnetic-field-aligned electric fields in the polar funnel of an accreting black hole (BH). Applying the pulsar outer-gap theory to BH magnetospheres, we find that such a lepton accelerator arises in the immediate vicinity of the event horizon due to frame-dragging, and that their gamma-ray luminosity increases with decreasing accretion rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the gamma-ray flux is enhanced along the rotation axis by more than an order of magnitude if the BH spin increases from $a=0.90M$ to $a=0.9999M$. As a result, if a ten-solar-mass, almost-maximally rotating BH is located within 3 kpc, when its accretion rate is between 0.005% and 0.01% of the Eddington rate, its high-energy flare becomes detectable with the Fermi/Large Area Telescope, provided that the flare lasts longer than 1.2 months and that we view the source nearly along the rotation axis. In addition, its very-high-energy flux is marginally detectable with the Cherenkov Telescope Array, provided that the flare lasts longer than a night and that our viewing angle is about 45 degrees with respect to the rotation axis.
  • Around a rapidly rotating black hole (BH), when the plasma accretion rate is much less than the Eddington rate, the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) cannot supply enough MeV photons that are capable of materializing as pairs. In such a charge-starved BH magnetosphere, the force-free condition breaks down in the polar funnels. Applying the pulsar outer-magnetospheric lepton accelerator theory to super-massive BHs, we demonstrate that a strong electric field arises along the magnetic field lines in the direct vicinity of the event horizon in the funnels, that the electrons and positrons are accelerated up to 100~TeV in this vacuum gap, and that these leptons emit copious photons via inverse-Compton (IC) process between 0.1~TeV and 30~TeV for a distant observer. It is found that these IC fluxes will be detectable with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, provided that a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus is located within 1~Mpc for a million-solar-mass central BH or within 30~Mpc for a billion-solar-mass central BH. These very-high-energy fluxes are beamed in a relatively small solid angle around the rotation axis because of the inhomogeneous and anisotropic distribution of the RIAF photon field, and show an anti-correlation with the RIAF submillimeter fluxes. The gap luminosity little depends on the three-dimensional magnetic-field configuration, because the Goldreich-Julian charge density, and hence the exerted electric field is essentially governed by the frame-dragging effect, not by the magnetic field configuration.
  • We present new high-resolution ALMA (13CO J=1-0 and J= 2-1) and CARMA (12CO and 13CO J=1-0) observations of two Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs): Arp 55 and NGC 2623. The new data are complementary to published and archival Submillimeter Array observations of 12CO J=2-1 and J=3-2. We perform a Bayesian likelihood non-local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis to constrain the molecular gas physical conditions such as temperature, column and volume densities and the [12CO]/[13CO] abundance ratio. For Arp 55, an early/intermediate staged merger, the line measurements are consistent with cold (~10-20 K), dense (>10$^{3.5}$ cm$^{-3}$) molecular gas. For NGC 2623, the molecular gas is warmer (~110 K) and less dense (~10$^{2.7}$ cm$^{-3}$). Since Arp 55 is an early/intermediate stage merger while NGC 2623 is a merger remnant, the difference in physical conditions may be an indicator of merger stage. Comparing the temperature and volume density of several LIRGs shows that the molecular gas, averaged over ~kpc scale, of advanced mergers is in general warmer and less dense than early/intermediate stage mergers. We also find that the [12CO]/[13CO] abundance ratio of NGC 2623 is unusually high (>250) when compared to the Milky Way; however, it follows a trend seen with other LIRGs in literature. This high [12CO]/[13CO] value is very likely due to stellar nucleosynthesis enrichment of the interstellar medium. On the other hand, Arp 55 has a more Galactic [12CO]/[13CO] value with the most probable [12CO]/[13CO] value being 20-30. We measure the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, $\alpha_{CO}$, to be ~0.1 and ~0.7 (3x10$^{-4}$/x$_{CO}$) M$_{\odot}$ (K km s$^{-1}$ pc$^{2}$)$^{-1}$ for Arp 55 and NGC 2623, respectively. Since Arp 55 is an early/intermediate , this suggests that the transition from a Galactic conversion factor to a LIRG value happens at an even earlier merger stage.
  • We report the $4 \, \sigma$ detection of a faint object with a flux of ~ 0.3 mJy, in the vicinity of the quadruply lensed QSO MG0414+0534 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array (ALMA) Band 7. The object is most probably a dusty dark dwarf galaxy, which has not been detected in either the optical, near-infrared (NIR) or radio (cm) bands. An anomaly in the flux ratio of the lensed images observed in Band 7 and the mid-infrared (MIR) band and the reddening of the QSO light color can be simultaneously explained if we consider the object as a lensing substructure with an ellipticity ~ 0.7 at a redshift of $0.5 \lesssim z \lesssim 1$. Using the best-fit lens models with three lenses, we find that the dark matter plus baryon mass associated with the object is $\sim 10^9\, M_{\odot}$, the dust mass is $\sim 10^7\,M_{\odot}$ and the linear size is $\gtrsim 5\,$kpc. Thus our findings suggest that the object is a dusty dark dwarf galaxy. A substantial portion of faint submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the universe may be attributed to such dark objects.
  • This paper presents the first detailed investigation of the characteristics of mm/submm phase fluctuation and phase correction methods obtained using ALMA with baseline lengths up to ~15 km. Most of the spatial structure functions (SSFs) show that the phase fluctuation increases as a function of baseline length, with a power-law slope of ~0.6. In many cases, we find that the slope becomes shallower (average of ~0.2-0.3) at baseline lengths longer than ~1 km, namely showing a turn-over in SSF. The phase correction method using water vapor radiometers (WVRs) works well, especially for the cases where PWV >1 mm, which reduces the degree of phase fluctuations by a factor of two in many cases. However, phase fluctuations still remain after the WVR phase correction, suggesting the existence of other turbulent constituent that cause the phase fluctuation. This is supported by occasional SSFs that do not exhibit any turn-over; these are only seen when the PWV is low or after WVR phase correction. This means that the phase fluctuation caused by this turbulent constituent is inherently smaller than that caused by water vapor. Since there is no turn-over in the SSF up to the maximum baseline length of ~15 km, this turbulent constituent must have scale height of 10 km or more, and thus cannot be water vapor, whose scale height is around 1 km. This large scale height turbulent constituent is likely to be water ice or a dry component. Excess path length fluctuation after the WVR phase correction at a baseline length of 10 km is large (>200 micron), which is significant for high frequency (>450 GHz or <700 micron) observations. These results suggest the need for an additional phase correction method, such as fast switching, in addition to the WVR phase correction. We simulated the fast switching, and the result suggests that it works well, with shorter cycle times linearly improving the coherence.
  • We performed near-diffraction-limited (~0.4 FWHM) N-band imaging of one of the nearest Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) in M51 with 8.2m Subaru telescope to study the nuclear structure and spectral energy distribution (SED) at 8-13 um. We found that the nucleus is composed of an unresolved core (at ~13 pc resolution, or intrinsic size corrected for the instrumental effect of <6 pc) and an extended halo (at a few tens pc scale), and each of their SEDs is almost flat. We examined the SED by comparing with the archival Spitzer IRS spectrum processed to mimic our chopping observation of the nucleus, and the published radiative-transfer model SEDs of the AGN clumpy dusty torus. The halo SED is likely due to circumnuclear star formation showing little Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission due to the AGN. The core SED is likely dominated by the AGN because of the following two reasons. Firstly, the clumpy torus model SEDs can reproduce the red mid-infrared continuum with apparently moderate silicate 9.7 um absorption. Secondly, the core 12 um luminosity and the absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity at 2-10 keV in the literature follow the mid-infrared-X-ray luminosity correlation known for the nearby AGNs including the Compton-thick ones.
  • Since the ALMA North America Prototype Antenna was awarded to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), SAO and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics (ASIAA) are working jointly to relocate the antenna to Greenland. This paper shows the status of the antenna retrofit and the work carried out after the recommissioning and subsequent disassembly of the antenna at the VLA has taken place. The next coming months will see the start of the antenna reassembly at Thule Air Base. These activities are expected to last until the fall of 2017 when commissioning should take place. In parallel, design, fabrication and testing of the last components are taking place in Taiwan.
  • We present the 3.5-yr monitoring results of 225 GHz opacity at the summit of the Greenland ice sheet (Greenland Summit Camp) at an altitude of 3200 m using a tipping radiometer. We chose this site as our submillimeter telescope (Greenland Telescope; GLT) site, because its location offers favorable baselines to existing submillimeter telescopes for global-scale VLBI. The site shows a clear seasonal variation with the average opacity lower by a factor of two during winter. For the winter quartiles of 25% and 50%, the Greenland site is about 10%-30% worse than the ALMA or the South Pole sites. Estimated atmospheric transmission spectra in winter season are similar to the ALMA site at lower frequencies (<450 GHz), which are transparent enough to perform astronomical observations almost all of the winter time with opacities <0.5, but 10%-25% higher opacities at higher frequencies (>450 GHz) than those at the ALMA site. This is due to the lower altitude of the Greenland site. Nevertheless, half of the winter time at the Greenland site can be used for astronomical observations at frequencies between 450 GHz and 1000 GHz with opacities <1.2, and 10% of the time show >10% transmittance in the THz (1035 GHz, 1350 GHz, and 1500 GHz) windows. One major advantage of the Greenland site in winter is that there is no diurnal variation due to the polar night condition, and therefore the durations of low-opacity conditions are significantly longer than at the ALMA site. Opacities lower than 0.05 or 0.04 can continue for more than 100 hours. Such long stable opacity conditions do not occur as often even at the South Pole; it happens only for the opacity lower than 0.05. Since the opacity variation is directly related to the sky temperature (background) variation, the Greenland site is suitable for astronomical observations that need unusually stable sky background.
  • We investigate the electrostatic acceleration of electrons and positrons in the vicinity of the event horizon, applying the pulsar outer-gap model to black hole magnetospheres. During a low accretion phase, the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) cannot emit enough MeV photons that are needed to sustain the force-free magnetosphere via two-photon collisions. In such a charge-starved region (or a gap), an electric field arises along the magnetic field lines to accelerate electrons and positrons into ultra-relativistic energies. These relativistic leptons emit copious gamma-rays via curvature and inverse-Compton (IC) processes. Some of such gamma-rays collide with the submillimeter-IR photons emitted from the RIAF to materialize as pairs, which polarize to partially screen the original acceleration electric field. It is found that the gap gamma-ray luminosity increases with decreasing accretion rate. However, if the accretion rate decreases too much, the diminished RIAF soft photon field can no longer sustain a stationary pair production within the gap. As long as a stationary gap is formed, the magnetosphere becomes force-free outside the gap by the cascaded pairs, irrespective of the BH mass. If a nearby stellar-mass black hole (BH) is in quiescence, or if a galactic intermediate-mass BH is in a very low accretion state, its curvature and IC emissions are found to be detectable with Fermi/LAT and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT). If a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus is located within a few tens of Mpc, the IC emission from its super-massive BH is marginally detectable with IACT.
  • Baryons cycle into galaxies from the inter-galactic medium, are converted into stars, and a fraction of the baryons are ejected out of galaxies by stellar feedback. Here we present new high resolution (3.9"; 68 pc) CO(2-1) and CO(3-2) images that probe these three stages of the baryon cycle in the nearby starburst M 82. We combine these new observations with previous CO(1-0) and [Fe II] images to study the physical conditions within the molecular gas. Using a Bayesian analysis and the radiative transfer code RADEX, we model molecular Hydrogen temperatures and densities, as well as CO column densities. Besides the disc, we concentrate on two regions within the galaxy: an expanding super-bubble and the base of a molecular streamer. Shock diagnostics, kinematics, and optical extinction suggest that the streamer is an inflowing filament, with a molecular gas mass inflow rate of 3.5 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. We measure the molecular gas mass outflow rate of the expanding super-bubble to be 17 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, 5 times higher than the inferred inflow rate, and 1.3 times the star formation rate of the galaxy. The high mass outflow rate and large star formation rate will deplete the galaxy of molecular gas within eight million years, unless there are additional sources of molecular gas.
  • We report a new 1-pc (30") resolution CS($J=2-1$) line map of the central 30 pc of the Galactic Center (GC), made with the Nobeyama 45m telescope. We revisit our previous study of the extraplanar feature called polar arc (PA), which is a molecular cloud located above SgrA* with a velocity gradient perpendicular to the Galactic plane. We find that the PA can be traced back to the Galactic disk. This provides clues of the launching point of the PA , roughly $6\times10^{6}$ years ago. Implications of the dynamical time scale of the PA might be related to the Galactic Center Lobe (GCL) at parsec scale. Our results suggest that in the central 30 pc of the GC, the feedback from past explosions could alter the orbital path of the molecular gas down to the central tenth of parsec. In the follow-up work of our new CS($J=2-1$) map, we also find that near the systemic velocity, the molecular gas shows an extraplanar hourglass-shaped feature (HG-feature) with a size of $\sim$13 pc. The latitude-velocity diagrams show that the eastern edge of the HG-feature is associated with an expanding bubble B1, $\sim$7 pc away from SgrA*. The dynamical time scale of this bubble is $\sim3\times10^{5}$ years. This bubble is interacting with the 50 km s$^{-1}$ cloud. Part of the molecular gas from the 50 km s$^{-1}$ cloud was swept away by the bubble to $b=-0.2deg$. The western edge of the HG-feature seems to be the molecular gas entrained from the 20 km s$^{-1}$ cloud towards the north of the Galactic disk. Our results suggest a fossil explosion in the central 30 pc of the GC a few 10$^{5}$ years ago.
  • Our aim is to characterize the polarized continuum emission properties including intensity, polarization position angle, and polarization percentage of Sgr A* at $\sim$100 (3.0 mm), $\sim$230 (1.3 mm), $\sim$345 (0.87 mm), $\sim$500 (0.6 mm), and $\sim$700 GHz (0.43 mm). We report continuum emission properties of Sgr A* at the above frequency bands, based on the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations. We measured flux densities of Sgr A* from ALMA single pointing and mosaic observations. We performed sinusoidal fittings to the observed (XX-YY)/I intensity ratios, to derive the polarization position angles and polarization percentages. We successfully detect polarized continuum emission from all observed frequency bands. We observed lower Stokes I intensity at $\sim$700 GHz than that at $\sim$500 GHz, which suggests that emission at $\gtrsim$500 GHz is from optically thin part of a synchrotron emission spectrum. Both the Stokes I intensity and the polarization position angle at our highest observing frequency of $\sim$700 GHz, may be varying with time. However, we do not yet detect variation in the polarization percentage at $>$500 GHz. The polarization percentage at $\sim$700 GHz is likely lower than that at $\sim$500 GHz. By comparing the $\sim$500 GHz and $\sim$700 GHz observations with the observations at lower frequency bands, we suggest that the intrinsic polarization position angle of Sgr A* is varying with time. This paper also reports the measurable polarization properties from the observed calibration quasars. The future simultaneous multi-frequency polarization observations are required for clarifying the time and frequency variation of polarization position angle and polarization percentage.
  • We report linearly polarized continuum emission properties of Sgr A* at $\sim$492 GHz, based on the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations. We used the observations of the likely unpolarized continuum emission of Titan, and the observations of C\textsc{i} line emission, to gauge the degree of spurious polarization. The Stokes I flux of 3.6$\pm$0.72 Jy during our run is consistent with extrapolations from the previous, lower frequency observations. We found that the continuum emission of Sgr A* at $\sim$492 GHz shows large amplitude differences between the XX and the YY correlations. The observed intensity ratio between the XX and YY correlations as a function of parallactic angle may be explained by a constant polarization position angle of $\sim$158$^{\circ}$$\pm$3$^{\circ}$. The fitted polarization percentage of Sgr A* during our observational period is 14\%$\pm$1.2\%. The calibrator quasar J1744-3116 we observed at the same night can be fitted to Stokes I = 252 mJy, with 7.9\%$\pm$0.9\% polarization in position angle P.A. = 4.1$^{\circ}$$\pm$4.2$^{\circ}$. The observed polarization percentage and polarization position angle in the present work appear consistent with those expected from longer wavelength observations in the period of 1999-2005. In particular, the polarization position angle at 492 GHz, expected from the previously fitted 167$^{\circ}$$\pm$7$^{\circ}$ intrinsic polarization position angle and (-5.6$\pm$0.7)$\times$10$^{5}$ rotation measure, is 155$^{+9}_{-8}$, which is consistent with our new measurement of polarization position angle within 1$\sigma$. The polarization percentage and the polarization position angle may be varying over the period of our ALMA 12m Array observations, which demands further investigation with future polarization observations.
  • We present an analysis of the ALMA long baseline science verification data of the gravitational lens system SDP.81. We fit the positions of the brightest clumps at redshift z=3.042 and a possible AGN component of the lensing galaxy at redshift z=0.2999 in the band 7 continuum image using a canonical lens model, a singular isothermal ellipsoid plus an external shear. Then, we measure the ratio of fluxes in some apertures at the source plane where the lensed images are inversely mapped. We find that the aperture flux ratios of band 7 continuum image are perturbed by 10-20 percent with a significance at 2 ~ 3 sigma level. Moreover, we measure the astrometric shifts of multiply lensed images near the caustic using the CO(8-7) line. Using a lens model best-fitted to the band 7 continuum image, we reconstruct the source image of the CO(8-7) line by taking linear combination of inverted quadruply lensed images. At the 50th channel (rest-frame velocity 28.6 km/s) of the CO(8-7) line, we find an imprint of astrometric shifts of the order of 0.01 arcsec in the source image. Based on a semi-analytic calculation, we find that the observed anomalous flux ratios and the astrometric shifts can be explained by intergalactic dark structures in the line of sight. A compensated homogeneous spherical clump with a mean surface mass density of the order of 10^8 solar mass h^-1 arcsec^-2 can explain the observed anomaly and astrometric shifts simultaneously.
  • Compiling data from literature and the ALMA archive, we show enhanced HCN(4-3)/HCO$^+$(4-3) and/or HCN(4-3)/CS(7-6) integrated intensity ratios in circumnuclear molecular gas around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) compared to those in starburst (SB) galaxies (submillimeter HCN-enhancement). The number of sample galaxies is significantly increased from our previous work. We expect this feature could potentially be an extinction-free energy diagnostic tool of nuclear regions of galaxies. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelings of the above molecular emission lines involving both collisional and radiative excitation, as well as a photon trapping effect were conducted to investigate the cause of the high line ratios in AGNs. As a result, we found that enhanced abundance ratios of HCN-to-HCO$^+$ and HCN-to-CS in AGNs as compared to SB galaxies by a factor of a few to even $>$ 10 is a plausible explanation for the submillimeter HCN-enhancement. However, a counter argument of a systematically higher gas density in AGNs than in SB galaxies can also be a plausible scenario. Although we could not fully discriminate these two scenarios at this moment due to insufficient amount of multi-transition, multi-species data, the former scenario equivalently claims for abnormal chemical composition in AGNs. Regarding the actual mechanism to realize the composition, we suggest it is difficult with conventional gas phase X-ray dominated region (XDR) ionization models to reproduce the observed high line ratios. We might have to take into account other mechanisms such as neutral-neutral reactions that are efficiently activated at high temperature environments and/or mechanically heated regions to further understand the high line ratios in AGNs.
  • Ground-based observations at terahertz (THz) frequencies are a newly explorable area of astronomy for the next ten years. We discuss science cases for a first-generation 10-m class THz telescope, focusing on the Greenland Telescope as an example of such a facility. We propose science cases and provide quantitative estimates for each case. The largest advantage of ground-based THz telescopes is their higher angular resolution (~ 4 arcsec for a 10-m dish), as compared to space or airborne THz telescopes. Thus, high-resolution mapping is an important scientific argument. In particular, we can isolate zones of interest for Galactic and extragalactic star-forming regions. The THz windows are suitable for observations of high-excitation CO lines and [N II] 205 um lines, which are scientifically relevant tracers of star formation and stellar feedback. Those lines are the brightest lines in the THz windows, so that they are suitable for the initiation of ground-based THz observations. THz polarization of star-forming regions can also be explored since it traces the dust population contributing to the THz spectral peak. For survey-type observations, we focus on ``sub-THz'' extragalactic surveys, whose uniqueness is to detect galaxies at redshifts z ~ 1--2, where the dust emission per comoving volume is the largest in the history of the Universe. Finally we explore possibilities of flexible time scheduling, which enables us to monitor active galactic nuclei, and to target gamma-ray burst afterglows. For these objects, THz and submillimeter wavelength ranges have not yet been explored.
  • We present ALMA Cycle 1 observations of the central kpc region of the luminous type-1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469 with unprecedented high resolution (0.5$"$ $\times$ 0.4$"$ = 165 pc $\times$ 132 pc) at submillimeter wavelengths. Utilizing the wide-bandwidth of ALMA, we simultaneously obtained HCN(4-3), HCO$^+$(4-3), CS(7-6), and partially CO(3-2) line maps, as well as the 860 $\mu$m continuum. The region consists of the central $\sim$ 1$"$ component and the surrounding starburst ring with a radius of $\sim$ 1.5$"$-2.5$"$. Several structures connect these components. Except for CO(3-2), these dense gas tracers are significantly concentrated towards the central $\sim$ 1$"$, suggesting their suitability to probe the nuclear regions of galaxies. Their spatial distribution resembles well those of centimeter and mid-infrared continuum emissions, but it is anti-correlated with the optical one, indicating the existence of dust obscured star formation. The integrated intensity ratios of HCN(4-3)/HCO$^+$(4-3) and HCN(4-3)/CS(7-6) are higher at the AGN position than at the starburst ring, which is consistent to our previous findings (submm-HCN enhancement). However, the HCN(4-3)/HCO$^+$(4-3) ratio at the AGN position of NGC 7469 (1.11$\pm$0.06) is almost half of the corresponding value of the low-luminosity type-1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 1097 (2.0$\pm$0.2), despite the more than two orders of magnitude higher X-ray luminosity of NGC 7469. But the ratio is comparable to that of the close vicinity of the AGN of NGC 1068 ($\sim$ 1.5). Based on these results, we speculate that some other heating mechanisms than X-ray (e.g., mechanical heating due to AGN jet) can contribute significantly for shaping the chemical composition in NGC 1097.
  • We present an unprecedented measurement of the disc stability and local instability scales in the luminous infrared Seyfert 1 host, NGC7469, based on ALMA observations of dense gas tracers and with a synthesized beam of 165 x 132 pc. While we confirm that non-circular motions are not significant in redistributing the dense interstellar gas in this galaxy, we find compelling evidence that the dense gas is a suitable tracer for studying the origin of its intensely high-mass star forming ring-like structure. Our derived disc stability parameter accounts for a thick disc structure and its value falls below unity at the radii in which intense star formation is found. Furthermore, we derive the characteristic instability scale and find a striking agreement between our measured scale of ~ 180 pc, and the typical sizes of individual complexes of young and massive star clusters seen in high-resolution images.
  • We present high angular resolution observations of the HCN(1-0) emission (at ~1" or ~34 pc), together with CO J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 observations, toward the Seyfert 2 nucleus of M51 (NGC 5194). The overall HCN(1-0) distribution and kinematics are very similar to that of the CO lines, which have been indicated as the jet-entrained molecular gas in our past observations. In addition, high HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio of about unity is observed along the jets, similar to that observed at the shocked molecular gas in our Galaxy. These results strongly indicate that both diffuse and dense gases are entrained by the jets and outflowing from the AGN. The channel map of HCN(1-0) at the systemic velocity shows a strong emission right at the nucleus, where no obvious emission has been detected in the CO lines. The HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio at this region reaches >2, a value that cannot be explained considering standard physical/chemical conditions. Based on our calculations, we suggest infrared pumping and possibly weak HCN masing, but still requiring an enhanced HCN abundance for the cause of this high ratio. This suggests the presence of a compact dense obscuring molecular gas in front of the nucleus of M51, which remains unresolved at our ~1" (~34 pc) resolution, and consistent with the Seyfert 2 classification picture.
  • We present the phase characteristics study of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) long (up to 3 km) baseline, which is the longest baseline tested so far using ALMA. The data consist of long time-scale (10 - 20 minutes) measurements on a strong point source (i.e., bright quasar) at various frequency bands (bands 3, 6, and 7, which correspond to the frequencies of about 88 GHz, 232 GHz, and 336 GHz). Water vapor radiometer (WVR) phase correction works well even at long baselines, and the efficiency is better at higher PWV (>1 mm) condition, consistent with the past studies. We calculate the spatial structure function of phase fluctuation, and display that the phase fluctuation (i.e., rms phase) increases as a function of baseline length, and some data sets show turn-over around several hundred meters to 1 km and being almost constant at longer baselines. This is the first millimeter/submillimeter structure function at this long baseline length, and to show the turn-over of the structure function. Furthermore, the observation of the turn-over indicates that even if the ALMA baseline length extends to the planned longest baseline of 15 km, fringes will be detected at a similar rms phase fluctuation as that at a few km baseline lengths. We also calculate the coherence time using the 3 km baseline data, and the results indicate that the coherence time for band 3 is longer than 400 seconds in most of the data (both in the raw and WVR-corrected data). For bands 6 and 7, WVR-corrected data have about twice longer coherence time, but it is better to use fast switching method to avoid the coherence loss.
  • We present high-resolution archival Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) CO J=3-2 and J=6-5 and HCO+ J=4-3 observations and new CARMA CO and 13CO J=1-0 observations of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 1614. The high-resolution maps show the previously identified ring-like structure while the CO J=3-2 map shows extended emission that traces the extended dusty features. We combined these new observations with previously published Submillimeter Array CO and 13CO J=2-1 observations to constrain the physical conditions of the molecular gas at a resolution of 230 pc using a radiative transfer code and a Bayesian likelihood analysis. At several positions around the central ring-like structure, the molecular gas is cold (20-40 K) and dense (> 10^{3.0} cm^{-3}) . The only region that shows evidence of a second molecular gas component is the "hole" in the ring. The CO-to-13CO abundance ratio is found to be greater than 130, more than twice the local interstellar medium value. We also measure the CO-to-H_{2} conversion factor, alpha_{CO}, to range from 0.9 to 1.5 M_sol (K km/s pc^{2})^{-1}.
  • We present first results of the study of a set of exceptional HI sources identified in the 40% ALFALFA extragalactic HI survey catalog alpha.40 as being both HI massive (M_HI > 10^10 Msun) and having high gas fractions for their stellar masses: the HIghMass galaxy sample. We analyze UV- and optical-broadband and Halpha images to understand the nature of their relatively underluminous disks in optical and to test whether their high gas fractions can be tracked to higher dark matter halo spin parameters or late gas accretion. Estimates of their star formation rates (SFRs) based on SED-fitting agree within uncertainties with the Halpha luminosity inferred SFRs. The HII region luminosity functions have standard slopes at the luminous end. The global SFRs demonstrate that the HIghMass galaxies exhibit active ongoing star formation (SF) with moderate SF efficiency, but relative to normal spirals, a lower integrated SFR in the past. Because the SF activity in these systems is spread throughout their extended disks, they have overall lower SFR surface densities and lower surface brightness in the optical bands. Relative to normal disk galaxies, the majority of HIghMass galaxies have higher Halpha equivalent widths and are bluer in their outer disks, implying an inside-out disk growth scenario. Downbending double exponential disks are more frequent than upbending disks among the gas-rich galaxies, suggesting that SF thresholds exist in the downbending disks, probably as a result of concentrated gas distribution.