• The ubiquity of clouds in the atmospheres of exoplanets, especially of super-Earths, is one of the outstanding issues for transmission spectra survey. The understanding about the formation process of clouds in super-Earths is necessary to interpret the observed spectra correctly. In this study, we investigate the vertical distributions of particle size and mass density of mineral clouds in super-Earths using a microphysical model that takes into account the vertical transport and growth of cloud particles in a self-consistent manner. We demonstrate that the vertical profiles of mineral clouds significantly vary with the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei and atmospheric metallicity. We find that the height of the cloud top increases with increasing metallicity as long as the metallicity is lower than a threshold. If the metallicity is larger than the threshold, the cloud-top height no longer increases appreciably with metallicity because coalescence yields larger particles of higher settling velocities. We apply our cloud model to GJ1214 b and GJ436 b for which recent transmission observations suggest the presence of high-altitude opaque clouds. For GJ436 b, we show that KCl particles can ascend high enough to explain the observation. For GJ1214 b, by contrast, the height of KCl clouds predicted from our model is too low to explain its flat transmission spectrum. Clouds made of highly porous KCl particles could explain the observations if the atmosphere is highly metal-rich, and hence the particle microstructure might be a key to interpret the flat spectrum of GJ1214 b.
  • The discovery of thousands of exoplanets over the last couple of decades has shown that the birth of planets is a very efficient process in nature. Theories invoke a multitude of mechanisms to describe the assembly of planets in the disks around pre-main-sequence stars, but observational constraints have been sparse on account of insufficient sensitivity and resolution. Understanding how planets form and interact with their parental disk is crucial also to illuminate the main characteristics of a large portion of the full population of planets that is inaccessible to current and near-future observations. This White Paper describes some of the main issues for our current understanding of the formation and evolution of planets, and the critical contribution expected in this field by the Next Generation Very Large Array.
  • Star formation in magnetically subcritical clouds is investigated using a three-dimensional non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics simulation. Since rapid cloud collapse is suppressed until the magnetic flux is sufficiently removed from the initially magnetically subcritical cloud by ambipolar diffusion, it takes > 5-10t_ff to form a protostar, where t_ff is the freefall timescale of the initial cloud. The angular momentum of the star forming cloud is efficiently transferred to the interstellar medium before the rapid collapse begins, and the collapsing cloud has a very low angular momentum. Unlike the magnetically supercritical case, no large-scale low-velocity outflow appears in such a collapsing cloud due to the short lifetime of the first core. Following protostar formation, a very weak high-velocity jet, which has a small momentum and might disappear at a later time, is driven near the protostar, while the circumstellar disc does not grow during the early mass accretion phase. The results show that the star formation process in magnetically subcritical clouds is qualitatively different from that in magnetically supercritical clouds.
  • We perform three-dimensional radiation non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics simulations and investigate the impact of the Hall effect on the angular momentum evolution in the collapsing cloud cores in which the magnetic field $\magB$ and angular momentum $\angJ$ are misaligned with each other. We find that the Hall effect notably changes the magnetic torques in the pseudo-disk, and strengthens and weakens the magnetic braking in cores with an acute and obtuse relative angles between $\magB$ and $\angJ$, respectively. This suggests that the bimodal evolution of the disk size may occur in early disk evolutionary phase even if $\magB$ and $\angJ$ are randomly distributed. We show that a counter-rotating envelope form in the upper envelope of the pseudo-disk in cloud cores with obtuse relative angles. We also find that a counter-rotating region forms at the midplane of the pseudo-disk in cloud cores with acute relative angles. The former and latter types of counter-rotating envelopes may be associated with the YSOs with a large ($r\sim100$ AU) and small ($r\lesssim10$ AU) disks, respectively.
  • Magnetorotational instability (MRI) has a potential to generate the vigorous turbulence in protoplanetary disks, although its turbulence strength and accretion stress remains debatable because of the uncertainty of MRI with low ionization fraction. We focus on the heating of electrons by strong electric fields which amplifies nonideal magnetohydrodynamic effects. The heated electrons frequently collide with and stick to dust grains, which in turn decreases the ionization fraction and is expected to weaken the turbulent motion driven by MRI. In order to quantitatively investigate the nonlinear evolution of MRI including the electron heating, we perform magnetohydrodynamical simulation with the unstratified shearing box. We introduce a simple analytic resistivity model depending on the current density by mimicking resistivity given by the calculation of ionization. Our simulation confirms that the electron heating suppresses magnetic turbulence when the electron heating occurs with low current density. We find a clear correlation between magnetic stress and its current density, which means that the magnetic stress is proportional to the squared current density. When the turbulent motion is completely suppressed, laminar accretion flow is caused by ordered magnetic field. We give an analytical description of the laminar state by using a solution of linear perturbation equations with resistivity. We also propose a formula that successfully predicts the accretion stress in the presence of the electron heating.
  • Recently, an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observation of the water snow line in the protoplanetary disk around the FU Orionis star V883 Ori was reported. The radial variation of the spectral index at mm-wavelengths around the snow line was interpreted as being due to a pileup of particles interior to the snow line. However, radial transport of solids in the outer disk operates on timescales much longer than the typical timescale of an FU Ori outburst ($10^{1}$--$10^{2}$ yr). Consequently, a steady-state pileup is unlikely. We argue that it is only necessary to consider water evaporation and re-coagulation of silicates to explain the recent ALMA observation of V883 Ori because these processes are short enough to have had their impact since the outburst. Our model requires the inner disk to have already been optically thick before the outburst, and our results suggest that the carbon content of pebbles is low.
  • The icy satellites around Jupiter are considered to have formed in a circumplanetary disk. While previous models focused on the formation of satellites starting from satellitesimals, the question of how satellitesimals form from smaller dust particles has not been addressed so far. In this work, we study the possibility that satellitesimals form in situ in a circumplanetary disk. We calculate the radial distribution of the surface density and representative size of icy dust particles that grow by colliding with each other and drift toward the central planet in a steady circumplanetary disk with a continuous supply of gas and dust from the parent protoplanetary disk. The radial drift barrier is overcome if the ratio of the dust to gas accretion rates onto the circumplanetary disk, $\dot{M}_{\mathrm{d}}/\dot{M}_{\mathrm{g}}$, is high and the strength of turbulence, $\alpha$, is not too low. The collision velocity is lower than the critical velocity of fragmentation when $\alpha$ is low. Taken together, we find that the conditions for satellitesimal formation via dust coagulation are given by $\dot{M}_{\mathrm{d}}/\dot{M}_{\mathrm{g}}\ge1$ and $10^{-4}\le\alpha<10^{-2}$. The former condition is generally difficult to achieve, suggesting that the in-situ satellitesimal formation via particle sticking is viable only under an extreme condition. We also show that neither satellitesimal formation via the collisional growth of porous aggregates nor via streaming instability is viable as long as $\dot{M}_{\mathrm{d}}/\dot{M}_{\mathrm{g}}$ is low.
  • The recent rapid progress in observations of circumstellar disks and extrasolar planets has reinforced the importance of understanding an intimate coupling between star and planet formation. Under such a circumstance, it may be invaluable to attempt to specify when and how planet formation begins in star-forming regions and to identify what physical processes/quantities are the most significant to make a link between star and planet formation. To this end, we have recently developed a couple of projects. These include an observational project about dust growth in Class 0 YSOs and a theoretical modeling project of the HL Tauri disk. For the first project, we utilize the archive data of radio interferometric observations, and examine whether dust growth, a first step of planet formation, occurs in Class 0 YSOs. We find that while our observational results can be reproduced by the presence of large ($\sim$ mm) dust grains for some of YSOs under the single-component modified blackbody formalism, an interpretation of no dust growth would be possible when a more detailed model is used. For the second project, we consider an origin of the disk configuration around HL Tauri, focusing on magnetic fields. We find that magnetically induced disk winds may play an important role in the HL Tauri disk. The combination of these attempts may enable us to move towards a comprehensive understanding of how star and planet formation are intimately coupled with each other.
  • The mechanism of angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks is fundamental to understand the distributions of gas and dust in the disks. The unprecedented, high spatial resolution ALMA observations taken toward HL Tau and subsequent radiative transfer modeling reveal that a high degree of dust settling is currently achieved at the outer part of the HL Tau disk. Previous observations however suggest a high disk accretion rate onto the central star. This configuration is not necessarily intuitive in the framework of the conventional viscous disk model, since efficient accretion generally requires a high level of turbulence, which can suppress dust settling considerably. We develop a simplified, semi-analytical disk model to examine under what condition these two properties can be realized in a single model. Recent, non-ideal MHD simulations are utilized to realistically model the angular momentum transport both radially via MHD turbulence and vertically via magnetically induced disk winds. We find that the HL Tau disk configuration can be reproduced well when disk winds are properly taken into account. While the resulting disk properties are likely consistent with other observational results, such an ideal situation can be established only if the plasma $\beta$ at the disk midplane is $\beta_0 \simeq 2 \times 10^4$ under the assumption of steady accretion. Equivalently, the vertical magnetic flux at 100 au is about 0.2 mG. More detailed modeling is needed to fully identify the origin of the disk accretion and quantitatively examine plausible mechanisms behind the observed gap structures in the HL Tau disk.
  • The total amount of dust (or "metallicity") and the dust distribution in protoplanetary disks are crucial for planet formation. Dust grains radially drift due to gas--dust friction, and the gas is affected by the feedback from dust grains. We investigate the effects of the feedback from dust grains on the viscous evolution of the gas, taking into account the vertical dust settling. The feedback from the grains pushes the gas outward. When the grains are small and the dust-to-gas mass ratio is much smaller than unity, the radial drift velocity is reduced by the feedback effect but the gas still drifts inward. When the grains are sufficiently large or piled-up, the feedback is so effective that forces the gas flows outward. Although the dust feedback is affected by dust settling, we found that the 2D approximation reasonably reproduces the vertical averaged flux of gas and dust. We also performed the 2D two-fluid hydrodynamic simulations to examine the effect of the feedback from the grains on the evolution of the gas disk. We show that when the feedback is effective, the gas flows outward and the gas density at the region within $\sim 10\ \mbox{AU}$ is significantly depleted. As a result, the dust-to-gas mass ratio at the inner radii may significantly excess unity, providing the environment where planetesimals are easily formed via, e.g., streaming instability. We also show that a simplified 1D model well reproduces the results of the 2D two-fluid simulations, which would be useful for future studies.
  • We analytically derive the expressions for the structure of the inner region of protoplanetary disks based on the results from the recent hydrodynamical simulations. The inner part of a disk can be divided into four regions: dust-free region with gas temperature in the optically thin limit, optically thin dust halo, optically thick condensation front and the classical optically thick region in order from the inside. We derive the dust-to-gas mass ratio profile in the dust halo using the fact that partial dust condensation regulates the temperature to the dust evaporation temperature. Beyond the dust halo, there is an optically thick condensation front where all the available silicate gas condenses out. The curvature of the condensation surface is determined by the condition that the surface temperature must be nearly equal to the characteristic temperature $\sim 1200{\,\rm K}$. We derive the mid-plane temperature in the outer two regions using the two-layer approximation with the additional heating by the condensation front for the outermost region. As a result, the overall temperature profile is step-like with steep gradients at the borders between the outer three regions. The borders might act as planet traps where the inward migration of planets due to gravitational interaction with the gas disk stops. The temperature at the border between the two outermost regions coincides with the temperature needed to activate magnetorotational instability, suggesting that the inner edge of the dead zone must lie at this border. The radius of the dead-zone inner edge predicted from our solution is $\sim$ 2-3 times larger than that expected from the classical optically thick temperature.
  • A number of transiting exoplanets have featureless transmission spectra that might suggest the presence of clouds at high altitudes. A realistic cloud model is necessary to understand the atmospheric conditions under which such high-altitude clouds can form. In this study, we present a new cloud model that takes into account the microphysics of both condensation and coalescence. Our model provides the vertical profiles of the size and density of cloud and rain particles in an updraft for a given set of physical parameters, including the updraft velocity and the number density of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). We test our model by comparing with observations of trade-wind cumuli on the Earth and ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter. For trade-wind cumuli, the model including both condensation and coalescence gives predictions that are consistent with observations, while the model including only condensation overestimates the mass density of cloud droplets by up to an order of magnitude. For Jovian ammonia clouds, the condensation-coalescence model simultaneously reproduces the effective particle radius, cloud optical thickness, and cloud geometric thickness inferred from Voyager observations if the updraft velocity and CCN number density are taken to be consistent with the results of moist convection simulations and Galileo probe measurements, respectively. These results suggest that the coalescence of condensate particles is important not only in terrestrial water clouds but also in Jovian ice clouds. Our model will be useful to understand how the dynamics, compositions, and nucleation processes in exoplanetary atmospheresaffects the vertical extent and optical thickness of exoplanetary clouds via cloud microphysics.
  • We report $\sim$3 au resolution imaging observations of the protoplanetary disk around TW Hya at 145 and 233 GHz with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. Our observations revealed two deep gaps ($\sim$25--50 \%) at 22 and 37~au and shallower gaps (a few \%) at 6, 28, and 44~au, as recently reported by Andrews et al. (2016). The central hole with a radius of $\sim3$~au was also marginally resolved. The most remarkable finding is that the spectral index $\alpha (R)$ between bands 4 and 6 peaks at the 22~au gap. The derived power-law index of the dust opacity $\beta (R)$ is $\sim1.7$ at the 22~au gap and decreases toward the disk center to $\sim0$. The most prominent gap at 22~au could be caused by the gravitational interaction between the disk and an unseen planet with a mass of $\lesssim$1.5 $M_\mathrm{Neptune}$ although other origins may be possible. The planet-induced gap is supported by the fact that $\beta (R)$ is enhanced at the 22~au gap, indicating a deficit of $\sim$mm-sized grains within the gap due to dust filtration by a planet.
  • In protoplanetary disks, micron-sized dust grains coagulate to form highly porous dust aggregates. Because the optical properties of these aggregates are not completely understood, it is important to investigate how porous dust aggregates scatter light. In this study, the light scattering properties of porous dust aggregates were calculated using a rigorous method, the T-matrix method, and the results were then compared with those obtained using the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye (RGD) theory and Mie theory with the effective medium approximation (EMT). The RGD theory is applicable to moderately large aggregates made of nearly transparent monomers. This study considered two types of porous dust aggregates, ballistic cluster-cluster agglomerates (BCCAs) and ballistic particle-cluster agglomerates (BPCAs). First, the angular dependence of the scattered intensity was shown to reflect the hierarchical structure of dust aggregates; the large-scale structure of the aggregates is responsible for the intensity at small scattering angles, and their small-scale structure determines the intensity at large scattering angles. Second, it was determined that the EMT underestimates the backward scattering intensity by multiple orders of magnitude, especially in BCCAs, because the EMT averages the structure within the size of the aggregates. It was concluded that the RGD theory is a very useful method for calculating the optical properties of BCCAs.
  • We report the first detection of a gap and a ring in 336 GHz dust continuum emission from the protoplanetary disk around TW Hya, using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). The gap and ring are located at around 25 and 41 au from the central star, respectively, and are associated with the CO snow line at ~30 au. The gap has a radial width of less than 15 au and a mass deficit of more than 23%, taking into account that the observations are limited to an angular resolution of ~15 au. In addition, the 13CO and C18O J = 3 - 2 lines show a decrement in CO line emission throughout the disk, down to ~10 au, indicating a freeze-out of gas-phase CO onto grain surfaces and possible subsequent surface reactions to form larger molecules. The observed gap could be caused by gravitational interaction between the disk gas and a planet with a mass less than super-Neptune (2M_{Neptune}), or could be the result of the destruction of large dust aggregates due to the sintering of CO ice.
  • Standard accretion disk models suggest that the snow line in the solar nebula migrated interior to the Earth's orbit in a late stage of nebula evolution. In this late stage, a significant amount of ice could have been delivered to 1 AU from outer regions in the form of mm to dm-sized pebbles. This raises the question why the present Earth is so depleted of water (with the ocean mass being as small as 0.023% of the Earth mass). Here we quantify the amount of icy pebbles accreted by terrestrial embryos after the migration of the snow line assuming that no mechanism halts the pebble flow in outer disk regions. We use a simplified version of the coagulation equation to calculate the formation and radial inward drift of icy pebbles in a protoplanetary disk. The pebble accretion cross section of an embryo is calculated using analytic expressions presented by recent studies. We find that the final mass and water content of terrestrial embryos strongly depends on the radial extent of the gas disk, the strength of disk turbulence, and the time at which the snow lines arrives at 1 AU. The disk's radial extent sets the lifetime of the pebble flow, while turbulence determines the density of pebbles at the midplane where the embryos reside. We find that the final water content of the embryos falls below 0.023 wt% only if the disk is compact (< 100 AU), turbulence is strong at 1 AU, and the snow line arrives at 1 AU later than 2-4 Myr after disk formation. If the solar nebula extended to 300 AU, initially rocky embryos would have evolved into icy planets of 1-10 Earth masses unless the snow-line migration was slow. If the proto-Earth contained water of ~ 1 wt% as might be suggested by the density deficit of the Earth's outer core, the formation of the proto-Earth was possible with weaker turbulence and with earlier (> 0.5-2 Myr) snow-line migration.
  • The latest observation of HL Tau by ALMA revealed spectacular concentric dust rings in its circumstellar disk. We attempt to explain the multiple ring structure as a consequence of aggregate sintering. Sintering is known to reduce the sticking efficiency of dust aggregates and occurs at temperatures slightly below the sublimation point of their constituent material. We here present a dust growth model incorporating sintering and use it to simulate global dust evolution due to sintering, coagulation, fragmentation, and radial inward drift in a modeled HL Tau disk. We show that aggregates consisting of multiple species of volatile ices experience sintering, collisionally disrupt, and pile up at multiple locations slightly outside the snow lines of the volatiles. At wavelengths of 0.87--1.3 mm, these sintering zones appear as bright, optically thick rings with a spectral slope of $\approx 2$, whereas the non-sintering zones as darker, optically thinner rings of a spectral slope of $\approx$ 2.3--2.5. The observational features of the sintering and non-sintering zones are consistent with those of the major bright and dark rings found in the HL Tau disk, respectively. Radial pileup and vertical settling occur simultaneously if disk turbulence is weak and if monomers constituting the aggregates are $\sim 1~{\rm \mu m}$ in radius. For the radial gas temperature profile of $T = 310(r/1~{\rm AU})^{-0.57}~{\rm K}$, our model perfectly reproduces the brightness temperatures of the optically thick bright rings, and reproduces their orbital distances to an accuracy of $\lesssim$ 30%.
  • When planetesimals grow via collisions in a turbulent disk, stirring through density fluctuation caused by turbulence effectively increases the relative velocities between planetesimals, which suppresses the onset of runaway growth. We investigate the onset of runaway growth in a turbulent disk through simulations that calculate the mass and velocity evolution of planetesimals. When planetesimals are small, the average relative velocity between planetesimals, $v_{\rm r}$, is much greater than their surface escape velocity, $v_{\rm esc}$, so that runaway growth does not occur. As planetesimals become large via collisional growth, $v_{\rm r}$ approaches $v_{\rm esc}$. When $v_{\rm r} \approx 1.5 v_{\rm esc}$, runaway growth of the planetesimals occurs. During the oligarchic growth subsequent to runaway growth, a small number of planetary embryos produced via runaway growth become massive through collisions with planetesimals with radii of that at the onset of runaway growth, $r_{\rm p,run}$. We analytically derive $r_{\rm p,run}$ as a function of the turbulent strength. Growing $\sim 10\,M_\oplus$ embryos that are suitable to become the cores of Jupiter and Saturn requires $r_{\rm p,run} \sim 100$\,km, which is similar to the proposed fossil feature in the size distribution of main belt asteroids. In contrast, the formation of Mars as quickly as suggested from Hf-W isotope studies requires small planetesimals at the onset of runaway growth. Thus, the conditions required to form Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn and the size distribution of the main-belt asteroids indicate that the turbulence increased in amplitude relative to the sound speed with increasing distance from the young Sun.
  • The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives vigorous turbulence in a region of protoplanetary disks where the ionization fraction is sufficiently high. It has recently been shown that the electric field induced by the MRI can heat up electrons and thereby affect the ionization balance in the gas. In particular, in a disk where abundant dust grains are present, the electron heating causes a reduction of the electron abundance, thereby preventing further growth of the MRI. By using the nonlinear Ohm's law that takes into account electron heating, we investigate where in protoplanetary disks this negative feedback between the MRI and ionization chemistry becomes important. We find that the "e-heating zone," the region where the electron heating limits the saturation of the MRI, extends out up to 80 AU in the minimum-mass solar nebula with abundant submicron-sized grains. This region is considerably larger than the conventional dead zone whose radial extent is $\sim20$ AU in the same disk model. Scaling arguments show that the MRI turbulence in the e-heating zone should have a significantly lower saturation level. Submicron-sized grains in the e-heating zone are so negatively charged that their collisional growth is unlikely to occur. Our present model neglects ambipolar and Hall diffusion, but our estimate shows that ambipolar diffusion would also affect the MRI in the e-heating zone.
  • Recent high-resolution, near-infrared images of protoplanetary disks have shown that these disks often present spiral features. Spiral arms are among the structures predicted decades ago by numerical simulations of disk-planet interaction and thus it is tempting to suspect that planetary perturbers are responsible for the observed signatures. However, such interpretation is not free of problems. The spirals are found to have large pitch angles, and in at least one case (HD 100546) the spiral feature appears effectively unpolarized, which implies thermal emission of the order of 1000K (465$\pm$40K at closer inspection). We have recently shown in two-dimensional models that shock dissipation in the supersonic wake of high-mass planets can lead to significant heating if the disk is sufficiently adiabatic. In this paper we extend this analysis to three dimensions in thermodynamically evolving disks. We use the Pencil Code in spherical coordinates for our models, with a prescription for thermal cooling based on the optical depth of the local vertical gas column. We use a 5$M_J$ planet, and show that shocks in the region around the planet where the Lindblad resonances occur heat the gas to substantially higher temperatures than the ambient disk gas at that radius. The gas is accelerated vertically away from the midplane by the shocks to form shock bores, and the gas falling back toward the midplane breaks up into a turbulent surf near the Lindblad resonances. This turbulence, although localized, has high $\alpha$ values, reaching 0.05 in the inner Lindblad resonance, and 0.1 in the outer one. We also find evidence that the disk regions heated up by the planetary shocks eventually becomes superadiabatic, generating convection far from the planet's orbit.
  • In this paper, we propose observational methods for detecting lightning in protoplanetary disks. We do so by calculating the critical electric field strength in the lightning matrix gas (LMG), the parts of the disk where the electric field is strong enough to cause lightning. That electric field accelerates multiple positive ion species to characteristic terminal velocities. In this paper, we present three distinct discharge models, with corresponding critical electric fields. We simulate the position-velocity diagrams and the integrated emission maps for the models. We calculate the measure of sensitivity values for detection of the models, and for distinguishing between the models. At the distance of TW-Hya (54pc), LMG that occupies $2\pi$ in azimuth and $25 \mathrm{au}<r<50 \mathrm{au}$ is $1200\sigma$- to $4000\sigma$-detectable. The lower limits of the radii of $5\sigma$-detectable LMG clumps are between 1.6 au and 5.3 au, depending on the models.
  • We investigate the formation and evolution of a first core, protostar, and circumstellar disc with a three-dimensional non-ideal (including both Ohmic and ambipolar diffusion) radiation magnetohydrodynamics simulation. We found that the magnetic flux is largely removed by magnetic diffusion in the first core phase and that the plasma $\beta$ of the centre of the first core becomes large, $\beta>10^4$. Thus, proper treatment of first core phase is crucial in investigating the formation of protostar and disc. On the other hand, in an ideal simulation, $\beta\sim 10$ at the centre of the first core. The simulations with magnetic diffusion show that the circumstellar disc forms at almost the same time of protostar formation even with a relatively strong initial magnetic field (the value for the initial mass-to-flux ratio of the cloud core relative to the critical value is $\mu=4$). The disc has a radius of $r \sim 1$ AU at the protostar formation epoch. We confirm that the disc is rotationally supported. We also show that the disc is massive ($Q\sim 1$) and that gravitational instability may play an important role in the subsequent disc evolution.
  • The ionization state of the gas plays a key role in the MHD of protoplanetary disks. However, the ionization state can depend on the gas dynamics, because electric fields induced by MHD turbulence can heat up plasmas and thereby affect the ionization balance. To study this nonlinear feedback, we construct an ionization model that includes plasma heating by electric fields and impact ionization by heated electrons, as well as charging of dust grains. We show that when plasma sticking onto grains is the dominant recombination process, the electron abundance in the gas decreases with increasing electric field strength. This is a natural consequence of electron-grain collisions whose frequency increases with electron's random velocity. The decreasing electron abundance may lead to a self-regulation of MHD turbulence. In some cases, not only the electron abundance but also the electric current decreases with increasing field strength in a certain field range. The resulting N-shaped current--field relation violates the fundamental assumption of the non-relativistic MHD that the electric field is uniquely determined by the current density. At even higher field strengths, impact ionization causes an abrupt increase of the electric current as expected by previous studies. We find that this discharge current is multi-valued (i.e., the current--field relation is S-shaped) under some circumstances, and that the intermediate branch is unstable. The N/S-shaped current--field relations may yield hysteresis in the evolution of MHD turbulence in some parts of protoplanetary disks.
  • We study the time evolution of a large-scale magnetic flux threading an accretion disk. Induction equation of the mean poloidal field is solved under the standard viscous disk model. Magnetic flux evolution is controlled by the two timescales: One is the timescale of the inward advection of the magnetic flux, tau_{adv}. This is induced by the dragging of the flux by the accreting gas. The other is the outward diffusion timescale of the magnetic flux tau_{dif}. We consider diffusion due to the Ohmic resistivity. These timescales can be significantly different from the disk viscous timescale tau_{disk}. The behaviors of the magnetic flux evolution is quite different depending on the magnitude relationship of the timescales tau_{adv}, \tau_{dif}, and tau_{disk}. The most interesting phenomena occurs when tau_{adv} << tau_{dif}, tau_{disk}. In such a case, the magnetic flux distribution approaches a quasi-steady profile much faster than the viscous evolution of the gas disk, and also the magnetic flux has been tightly bundled to the inner part of the disk. In the inner part, although the poloidal magnetic field becomes much stronger than the interstellar magnetic field, the field strength is limited to the maximum value that is analytically given by our previous work (Okuzumi et al. 2014, ApJ, 785, 127). We also find a condition for that the initial large magnetic flux, which is a fossil of the magnetic field dragging during the early phase of star formation, survives for a duration in which significant gas disk evolution proceeds.
  • Context. Dust grains coagulate to form dust aggregates in protoplanetary disks. Their porosity can be extremely high in the disks. Although disk emission may come from fluffy dust aggregates, the emission has been modeled with compact grains. Aims. We aim to reveal the mass opacity of fluffy aggregates from infrared to millimeter wavelengths with the filling factor ranging from 1 down to $10^{-4}$. Methods. We use Mie calculations with an effective medium theory. The monomers are assumed to be 0.1 ${\rm \mu m}$ sized grains, which is much shorter than the wavelengths that we focus on. Results. We find that the absorption mass opacity of fluffy aggregates are characterized by the product $a\times f$, where $a$ is the dust radius and $f$ is the filling factor, except for the interference structure. The scattering mass opacity is also characterized by $af$ at short wavelengths while it is higher in more fluffy aggregates at long wavelengths. We also derive the analytic formula of the mass opacity and find that it reproduces the Mie calculations. We also calculate the expected difference of the emission between compact and fluffy aggregates in protoplanetary disks with a simple dust growth and drift model. We find that compact grains and fluffy aggregates can be distinguished by the radial distribution of the opacity index $\beta$. The previous observation of the radial distribution of $\beta$ is consistent with the fluffy case, but more observations are required to distinguish between fluffy or compact. In addition, we find that the scattered light would be another way to distinguish between compact grains and fluffy aggregates.