• Massive stars shape their surroundings with mass loss from winds during their lifetimes. Fast ejecta from supernovae, from these massive stars, shocks this circumstellar medium. Emission generated by this interaction provides a window into the final stages of stellar evolution, by probing the history of mass loss from the progenitor. Here we use Chandra and Swift x-ray observations of the type II-P/L SN 2013ej to probe the history of mass loss from its progenitor. We model the observed x-rays as emission from both heated circumstellar matter and supernova ejecta. The circumstellar density profile probed by the supernova shock reveals a history of steady mass loss during the final 400 years. The inferred mass loss rate of $3 \times 10^{-6} {\rm \; M_\odot \; yr^{-1}}$ points back to a 14 $M_\odot$ progenitor. Soon after the explosion we find significant absorption of reverse shock emission by a cooling shell. The column depth of this shell observed in absorption provides an independent and consistent measurement of the circumstellar density seen in emission. We also determine the efficiency of cosmic ray acceleration from x-rays produced by Inverse Compton scattering of optical photons by relativistic electrons. Only about 1 percent of the thermal energy is used to accelerate electrons. Our x-ray observations and modeling provides stringent tests for models of massive stellar evolution and micro-physics of shocks.
  • Type Ia supernovae, with their remarkably homogeneous light curves and spectra, have been used as standardizable candles to measure the accelerating expansion of the Universe. Yet, their progenitors remain elusive. Common explanations invoke a degenerate star (white dwarf) which explodes upon reaching close to the Chandrasekhar limit, by either steadily accreting mass from a companion star or violently merging with another degenerate star. We show that circumstellar interaction in young Galactic supernova remnants can be used to distinguish between these single and double degenerate progenitor scenarios. Here we propose a new diagnostic, the Surface Brightness Index, which can be computed from theory and compared with Chandra and VLA observations. We use this method to demonstrate that a double degenerate progenitor can explain the decades-long flux rise and size increase of the youngest known Galactic SNR G1.9+0.3. We disfavor a single degenerate scenario. We attribute the observed properties to the interaction between a steep ejecta profile and a constant density environment. We suggest using the upgraded VLA to detect circumstellar interaction in the remnants of historical Type Ia supernovae in the Local Group of galaxies. This may settle the long-standing debate over their progenitors.
  • We present radio and X-ray observations of the nearby Type IIb Supernova 2013df in NGC4414 from 10 to 250 days after the explosion. The radio emission showed a peculiar soft-to-hard spectral evolution. We present a model in which inverse Compton cooling of synchrotron emitting electrons can account for the observed spectral and light curve evolution. A significant mass loss rate, $\dot{M} \approx 8 \times 10^{-5}\,\rm M_{\odot}/yr$ for a wind velocity of 10 km/s, is estimated from the detailed modeling of radio and X-ray emission, which are primarily due to synchrotron and bremsstrahlung, respectively. We show that SN 2013df is similar to SN 1993J in various ways. The shock wave speed of SN 2013df was found to be average among the radio supernovae; $v_{sh}/c \sim 0.07$. We did not find any significant deviation from smooth decline in the light curve of SN 2013df. One of the main results of our self-consistent multiband modeling is the significant deviation from energy equipartition between magnetic fields and relativistic electrons behind the shock. We estimate $\epsilon_{e} = 200 \epsilon_{B}$. In general for Type IIb SNe, we find that the presence of bright optical cooling envelope emission is linked with free-free radio absorption and bright thermal X-ray emission. This finding suggests that more extended progenitors, similar to that of SN 2013df, suffer from substantial mass loss in the years before the supernova.
  • We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of supernova 2013ej. It is one of the brightest type II supernovae exploded in a nearby ($\sim 10$ Mpc) galaxy NGC 628. The light curve characteristics are similar to type II SNe, but with a relatively shorter ($ \sim85 $ day) and steeper ($ \sim1.7 $ mag (100 d)$^{-1} $ in V) plateau phase. The SN shows a large drop of 2.4 mag in V band brightness during plateau to nebular transition. The absolute ultraviolet (UV) light curves are identical to SN 2012aw, showing a similar UV plateau trend extending up to 85 days. The radioactive $^{56}$Ni mass estimated from the tail luminosity is $ 0.02 $M$_{\odot}$ which is significantly lower than typical type IIP SNe. The characteristics of spectral features and evolution of line velocities indicate that SN 2013ej is a type II event. However, light curve characteristics and some spectroscopic features provide strong support in classifying it as a type IIL event. A detailed SYNOW modelling of spectra indicates the presence of some high velocity components in H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ profiles, implying possible ejecta-CSM interaction. The nebular phase spectrum shows an unusual notch in the H$\alpha$ emission which may indicate bipolar distribution of $^{56}$Ni. Modelling of the bolometric light curve yields a progenitor mass of $ \sim14 $M$_{\odot}$ and a radius of $ \sim450 $R$_{\odot}$, with a total explosion energy of $ \sim2.3\times10^{51} $ erg.
  • Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are characterized by ultra-relativistic outflows, while supernovae are generally characterized by non-relativistic ejecta. GRB afterglows decelerate rapidly usually within days, because their low-mass ejecta rapidly sweep up a comparatively larger mass of circumstellar material. However supernovae, with heavy ejecta, can be in nearly free expansion for centuries. Supernovae were thought to have non-relativistic outflows except for few relativistic ones accompanied by GRBs. This clear division was blurred by SN 2009bb, the first supernova with a relativistic outflow without an observed GRB. Yet the ejecta from SN 2009bb was baryon loaded, and in nearly-free expansion for a year, unlike GRBs. We report the first supernova discovered without a GRB, but with rapidly decelerating mildly relativistic ejecta, SN 2012ap. We discovered a bright and rapidly evolving radio counterpart driven by the circumstellar interaction of the relativistic ejecta. However, we did not find any coincident GRB with an isotropic fluence of more than a sixth of the fluence from GRB 980425. This shows for the first time that central engines in type Ic supernovae, even without an observed GRB, can produce both relativistic and rapidly decelerating outflows like GRBs.
  • We present the radio observations and modeling of an optically bright Type II-P supernova (SN), SN 2012aw which exploded in the nearby galaxy Messier 95 (M95) at a distance of $10\ \rm Mpc$. The spectral index values calculated using $C$, $X$ & $K$ bands are smaller than the expected values for optically thin regime. During this time the optical bolometric light curve stays in the plateau phase. We interpret the low spectral index values to be a result of electron cooling. On the basis of comparison between Compton cooling timescale and Synchrotron cooling timescale we find that inverse Compton cooling process dominates over synchrotron cooling process. We therefore model the radio emission as synchrotron emission from a relativistic electron population with a high energy cutoff. The cutoff is determined by comparing the electron cooling time scale $t_{cool}$ and the acceleration time scale $\tilde t_{acc}$. We constrain the mass loss rate in the wind ($\dot M\sim 1.9\times10^{-6}\ \rm M_{\odot}yr^{-1}$) and the equipartition factor between relativistic electrons and the magnetic field ($\tilde \alpha=\epsilon_e/\epsilon_B\sim 1.12\times10^2$) through our modeling of radio emission. Although the time of explosion is fairly well constrained by optical observations within about $2\ \rm days$, we explore the effect of varying the time of explosion to best fit the radio light curves. The best fit is obtained for the explosion date as 2012 March 15.3 UT.
  • In the last three decades, about 50 radio supernovae have been detected as a result of targeted searches of optically discovered supernovae in the local universe. Despite this relatively small number some diversity among them has already been identified which is an indication of the underlying richness of radio supernovae waiting to be discovered. For example, comparison of star formation and supernova discovery rate imply that as many as half of the supernovae remain undetected in the traditional optical searches, either because of intrinsic dimness or due to dust obscuration. This has far reaching consequences to the models of stellar and galaxy evolution. A radio sky survey would be ideal to uncover larger supernova population. Transient radio sky would benefit significantly from such a survey. With the advent of advanced gravitational wave detectors a new window is set to open on the local Universe. Localization of these gravitational detectors is poor to identify electromagnetic counterparts of the gravitational wave sources. However, the longer lasting radio emission accompanied in these sources could be effectively identified in a radio sky survey. We advocate a medium area ($\approx$ a few thousand $\rm deg^{2}$) radio sky survey at C-band. Alternatively, a survey at S-band has advantage of larger sky coverage without serious loss of the science case as presented here. Understanding the background in radio sky will be of paramount importance for the upcoming sensitive radio facilities including the Square Kilometer Array.
  • We present extensive radio and X-ray observations of SN\, 2012au, the energetic radio luminous supernova of type Ib that may be a link between subsets of hydrogen-poor superluminous and normal core-collapse supernovae. The observations closely follow models of synchrotron emission from shock heated circum-burst medium that has a wind density profile ($\rho \propto r^{-2}$). We infer a sub-relativistic velocity for the shock wave $v \approx 0.2\,c$ and a radius of $r \approx 1.4 \times 10^{16} \rm cm$ at 25 days after the estimated date of explosion. For a constant wind velocity of 1000 km/s we determine the constant mass loss rate of the progenitor to be $\dot{M} = 3.6 \times 10^{-6} \rm M_{\odot} yr^{-1}$, consistent with the estimates from X-ray observations. We estimate the total internal energy of the radio emitting material to be $E \approx 10^{47} \rm erg$, which is intermediate to SN\,1998bw and SN\,2002ap. Evolution of the radio light curves of SN\,2012au is consistent with interaction with a smoothly distributed circum-burst medium and absence of stellar shells ejected from previous outbursts out to $r \approx 10^{17} \rm cm$ from the supernova site. Based on this we conclude that the evolution of the SN\,2012au progenitor star was relatively quiet during the final years preceding explosion. We find that the bright radio emission from SN2012au was not dissimilar from other core collapse supernovae despite it's extraordinary optical properties. We speculate that it was the nature of the explosion that led to the unusual demise of the SN2012au progenitor star.
  • We present densely-sampled UBVRI/griz photometric and low-resolution (6-10A) optical spectroscopic observations from 4 to 270 days after explosion of a newly discovered type II SN 2012aw in a nearby (~9.9 Mpc) galaxy M95. The light-curve characteristics of apparent magnitudes, colors, bolometric luminosity and the presence and evolution of prominent spectral features are found to have striking similarity with the archetypal IIP SNe 1999em, 1999gi and 2004et. The early time observations of SN 2012aw clearly detect minima in the light-curve of V, R and I bands near 37 days after explosion and this we suggest to be an observational evidence for emergence of recombination phase. The mid-plateau MV magnitude (-16.67 $\pm$ 0.04) lies in between the bright (~ -18) and subluminous (~ -15) IIP SNe. The mass of nickel is 0.06$\pm$0.01 M_sun. The SYNOW modelling of spectra indicate that the value and evolution of photospheric velocity is similar to SN 2004et, but about ~600 km/s higher than that of SNe 1999em and 1999gi at comparable epochs. This trend is more apparent in the line velocities of H alpha and H beta. A comparison of ejecta velocity properties with that of existing radiation-hydrodynamical simulations indicate that the energy of explosion lies in the range 1-2x10^51 ergs; a further comparison of nebular phase [Oi] doublet luminosity with SNe 2004et and 1987A indicate that the mass of progenitor star is about 14-15 M_sun. The presence of high-velocity absorption features in the mid-to-late plateau and possibly in early phase spectra show signs of interaction between ejecta and the circumstellar matter; being consistent with its early-time detection at X-ray and radio wavebands.
  • Supernova 2012A was discovered on 7.39UT, January, 2012 in the nearby galaxy NGC 3239 at an unfiltered magnitude of 14.6 and classified spectroscopically as a Type IIP event. Here, we present the optical photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the event during 14d to 130d post explosion.
  • Massive stars, possibly red supergiants, which retain extended hydrogen envelopes until core collapse, produce Type II Plateau (IIP) supernovae. The ejecta from these explosions shock the circumstellar matter originating from the mass loss of the progenitor during the final phases of its life. This interaction accelerates particles to relativistic energies which then lose energy via synchrotron radiation in the shock-amplified magnetic fields and inverse Compton scattering against optical photons from the supernova. These processes produce different signatures in the radio and X-ray part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Observed together, they allow us to break the degeneracy between shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification. In this work we use X-rays observations from the Chandra and radio observations from the ATCA to study the relative importance of processes which accelerate particles and those which amplify magnetic fields in producing the non-thermal radiation from SN 2011ja. We use radio observations to constrain the explosion date. Multiple Chandra observations allow us to probe the history of variable mass loss from the progenitor. The ejecta expands into a low density bubble followed by interaction with a higher density wind from a red supergiant consistent with ZAMS mass greater than 16 solar masses. Our results suggest that a fraction of type IIP supernovae may interact with circumstellar media set up by non-steady winds.
  • We report four years of radio and X-ray monitoring of the Type IIn supernova SN 2006jd at radio wavelengths with the Very Large Array, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Expanded Very Large Array; at X-ray wavelengths with {\em Chandra}, {\em XMM-Newton} and {\em Swift}-XRT. We assume that the radio and X-ray emitting particles are produced by shock interaction with a dense circumstellar medium. The radio emission shows an initial rise that can be attributed to free-free absorption by cool gas mixed into the nonthermal emitting region; external free-free absorption is disfavored because of the shape of the rising light curves and the low gas column density inferred along the line of sight to the emission region. The X-ray luminosity implies a preshock circumstellar density $\sim 10^6$ cm$^{-3}$ at a radius $r\sim 2\times 10^{16}$ cm, but the column density inferred from the photoabsorption of X-rays along the line of sight suggests a significantly lower density. The implication may be an asymmetry in the interaction. The X-ray spectrum shows Fe line emission at 6.9 keV that is stronger than is expected for the conditions in the X-ray emitting gas. We suggest that cool gas mixed into the hot gas plays a role in the line emission. Our radio and X-ray data both suggest the density profile is flatter than $r^{-2}$ because of the slow evolution of the unabsorbed emission.
  • Type IIP (Plateau) Supernovae are the most commonly observed variety of core collapse events. They have been detected in a wide range of wavelengths from radio, through optical to X-rays. The standard picture of a type IIP supernova has the blastwave interacting with the progenitor's circumstellar matter to produce a hot region bounded by a forward and a reverse shock. This region is thought to be responsible for most of the X-ray and radio emission from these objects. Yet the origin of X-rays from these supernovae is not well understood quantitatively. The relative contributions of particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification in generating the X-ray and radio emission need to be determined. In this work we analyze archival Chandra observations of SN 2004dj, the nearest supernova since SN 1987A, along with published radio and optical information. We determine the pre-explosion mass loss rate, blastwave velocity, electron acceleration and magnetic field amplification efficiencies. We find that a greater fraction of the thermal energy goes into accelerating electrons than into amplifying magnetic fields. We conclude that the X-ray emission arises out of a combination of inverse Compton scattering by non-thermal electrons accelerated in the forward shock and thermal emission from supernova ejecta heated by the reverse shock.
  • Green Peas are a new class of young, emission line galaxies that were discovered by citizen volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their low stellar mass, low metallicity and very high star formation rates make Green Peas the nearby (z~0.2) analogs of the Lyman-break Galaxies (LBGs) which account for the bulk of the star formation in the early universe (z~2-5). They thus provide accessible laboratories in the nearby Universe for understanding star formation, supernova feedback, particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification in early galaxies. We report the first direct radio detection of Green Peas with low frequency GMRT observations and our stacking detection with archival VLA FIRST data. We show that the radio emission implies that these extremely young galaxies already have magnetic fields (>30 muG) even larger than that of the Milky Way. This is at odds with the present understanding of magnetic field growth based on amplification of seed fields by dynamo action over a galaxy's lifetime. Our observations strongly favor models with pregalactic magnetic fields at muG levels.
  • Intrinsic luminosities are related to rotation velocities of disk galaxies by Tully Fisher (TF) relations. The Baryonic TF (BTF) relation has recently been explained with Dark Matter and Newtonian Gravity as well as Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). However, recent work has pointed out that the currently used BTF relation ignores the contribution from hot gas and oversimplifies complex galaxy-scale physics. In this Letter, we advocate the use of the Neutral Hydrogen TF (HITF) relationship, which is free from dust obscuration and stellar evolution effects, as a clean probe of gravity and dynamics in the weak field regime. We incorporate the physics of hot gas from supernova feedback which drives the porosity of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). A simple model that includes supernovae feedback, is generalized to include a parametrized effective gravitational force law. We test our model against a catalogue of galaxies, spanning the full range of disks from dwarf galaxies to giant spirals, to demonstrate that a Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) law for star formation and simple Newtonian gravity is adequate for explaining the observed HI scaling relations. The data rules out MOND-like theories, within the scope of this model.
  • Under certain general conditions in an expanding universe, the luminosity distance (d_L) and angular diameter distance (d_A) are connected by the Etherington relation as d_L = d_A (1 + z)^2. The Tolman test suggests the use of objects of known surface brightness, to test this relation. In this letter, we propose the use of redshifted 21 cm signal from disk galaxies, where neutral hydrogen (HI) masses are seen to be almost linearly correlated with surface area, to conduct a new Tolman test. We construct simulated catalogs of galaxies, with the observed size-luminosity relation and realistic redshift evolution of HI mass functions, likely to be detected with the planned Square Kilometer Array (SKA). We demonstrate that these observations may soon provide the best implementation of the Tolman test to detect any violation of the Etherington relation.
  • Understanding the origin of the highest energy cosmic rays is a crucial step in probing new physics at energies unattainable by terrestrial accelerators. Their sources remain an enigma half a century after their discovery. They must be accelerated in the local universe as otherwise interaction with cosmic background radiations would severely deplete the flux of protons and nuclei at energies above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) limit. Hypernovae, nearby GRBs, AGNs and their flares have all been suggested and debated in the literature as possible sources. Type Ibc supernovae have a local sub-population with mildly relativistic ejecta which are known to be sub-energetic GRBs or X-Ray Flashes for sometime and more recently as those with radio afterglows but without detected GRB counterparts, such as SN 2009bb. In this work we measure the size-magnetic field evolution, baryon loading and energetics of SN 2009bb using its radio spectra obtained with VLA and GMRT. We show that the engine-driven SNe lie above the Hillas line and they can explain the characteristics of post-GZK UHECRs.
  • Relativistic supernovae have been discovered until recently only through their association with long duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). As the ejecta mass is negligible in comparison to the swept up mass, the blastwaves of such explosions are well described by the Blandford-McKee (in the ultra relativistic regime) and Sedov-Taylor (in the non-relativistic regime) solutions during their afterglows. However, the recent discovery of the relativistic supernova SN 2009bb, without a detected GRB, has indicated the possibility of highly baryon loaded mildly relativistic outflows which remains in nearly free expansion phase during the radio afterglow. In this work, we consider the dynamics and emission from a massive, relativistic shell, launched by a Central Engine Driven EXplosion (CEDEX), decelerating adiabatically due to its collision with the pre-explosion circumstellar wind profile of the progenitor. We show that this model explains the observed radio evolution of the prototypical SN 2009bb and demonstrate that SN 2009bb had a highly baryon loaded, mildly relativistic outflow.
  • Galaxies evolve continuously under the influence of self-gravity, rotation, accretion, mergers and feedback. The currently favored cold dark matter cosmological framework, suggests a hierarchical process of galaxy formation, wherein the present properties of galaxies are decided by their individual histories of being assembled from smaller pieces. However, recent studies have uncovered surprising correlations among the properties of galaxies, to the extent of forming a one-parameter set lying on a single fundamental line. It has been argued in the literature that such simplicity is hard to explain within the paradigm of hierarchical galaxy mergers. One of the puzzling results, is the simple linear correlation between the neutral hydrogen mass and the surface area, implying that widely different galaxies share very similar neutral hydrogen surface densities. In this work we show that self-regulated star formation, driven by the competition between gravitational instabilities and mechanical feedback from supernovae, can explain the nearly constant neutral hydrogen surface density across galaxies. We therefore recover the simple scaling relation observed between the neutral hydrogen mass and surface area. This result furthers our understanding of the surprising simplicity in the observed properties of diverse galaxies.
  • We provide a new analytic blastwave solution which generalizes the Blandford-McKee solution to arbitrary ejecta masses and Lorentz factors. Until recently relativistic supernovae have been discovered only through their association with long duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). The blastwaves of such explosions are well described by the Blandford-McKee (in the ultra relativistic regime) and Sedov-Taylor (in the non-relativistic regime) solutions during their afterglows, as the ejecta mass is negligible in comparison to the swept up mass. The recent discovery of the relativistic supernova SN 2009bb, without a detected GRB, opens up the possibility of highly baryon loaded mildly relativistic outflows which remains in nearly free expansion phase during the radio afterglow. In this work, we consider a massive, relativistic shell, launched by a Central Engine Driven EXplosion (CEDEX), decelerating adiabatically due to its collision with the pre-explosion circumstellar wind profile of the progenitor. We compute the synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons in the shock amplified magnetic field. This models the radio emission from the circumstellar interaction of a CEDEX. We show that this model explains the observed radio evolution of the prototypical SN 2009bb and demonstrate that SN 2009bb had a highly baryon loaded, mildly relativistic outflow. We discuss the effect of baryon loading on the dynamics and observational manifestations of a CEDEX. In particular, our predicted angular size of SN 2009bb is consistent with VLBI upper limits on day 85, but is presently resolvable on VLBI angular scales, since the relativistic ejecta is still in the nearly free expansion phase.
  • The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays remains an enigma. They offer a window to new physics, including tests of physical laws relevant to their propagation and interactions, at energies unattainable by terrestrial accelerators. They must be accelerated locally, as otherwise background radiations would severely suppress the flux of protons and nuclei, at energies above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) limit. Nearby Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), Hypernovae, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) and their flares, have all been suggested and debated as possible sources. A local sub-population of type Ibc supernovae (SNe) with mildly relativistic outflows have been detected as sub-energetic GRBs or X-Ray Flashes (XRFs) and recently as radio afterglows without detected GRB counterparts. We measure the size-magnetic field evolution, baryon loading and energetics, using the observed radio spectra of SN 2009bb. We place such engine-driven SNe above the Hillas line and establish that they can readily explain the post-GZK UHECRs.
  • Several neutral hydrogen (HI) cavities have been detected in the Milky Way and other nearby star forming galaxies. It has been suggested that at least a fraction of them may be expanding supershells driven by the combined mechanical feedback from multiple supernovae occurring in an OB association. Yet most extragalactic HI holes have neither a demonstrated expansion velocity, nor an identified OB association inside them. In this work, we report on the discovery of an unbroken expanding HI supershell in the nearby spiral galaxy M101, with an UV emitting OB association inside it. We measure its size (500 pc) and expansion velocity (20 km/s) by identifying both its approaching and receding components in the position-velocity space, using 21 cm emission spectroscopy. This provides us with an ideal system to test the theory of supershells driven by the mechanical feedback from multiple supernovae. The UV emission of the cluster inside the supershell is compared with simulated spectral energy distribution of synthetic clusters of the appropriate age (~15 Myr). The observed UV flux is found to be consistent with an association of the appropriate mass (~10^5 Solar Mass) and age required by the energy budget of the supershell. Properties of this supershell and another previously reported in the same galaxy are used to infer its neutral hydrogen scale height and mean neutral hydrogen density in the disk. The presence of another UV emitting stellar association in over-dense swept up gas is discussed in the context of propagating star formation.
  • The pedagogic two stste system of the ammonia molecule is used to illustrate the phenomenon of environment induced molecular localization in pyramidal molecules. A semiclassical model is used to describe a gas of pyramidal molecules interacting via hard ball collisions. This modifies the tunnelling dynamics between the classical equilibrium configurations of an isolated molecule. For sufficiently high pressures, the model explains molecular localization in these classical configurations. The decrease in the inversion line frequency of ammonia, noted upon increase in pressure, is also studied.
  • The mass radius relationship of white dwarfs, near the Chandrasekhar Limit, is derived for a toy model of uniform density, using the variational principle. A power law scaling, reminiscent of those found in 2nd order phase transitions, is obtained. The derived exponent is shown to explain the relationship obtained by numerically integrating the TOV equations with the equation of state for a relativistic Fermi gas of electrons.
  • A simple experiment is described for the direct determination of the wavelength dependence of the Rayleigh scattering cross section using the classical example of the blue sky.