• Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of human brain cancer that is under active study in the field of cancer biology. Its rapid progression and the relative time cost of obtaining molecular data make other readily-available forms of data, such as images, an important resource for actionable measures in patients. Our goal is to utilize information given by medical images taken from GBM patients in statistical settings. To do this, we design a novel statistic---the smooth Euler characteristic transform (SECT)---that quantifies magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of tumors. Due to its well-defined inner product structure, the SECT can be used in a wider range of functional and nonparametric modeling approaches than other previously proposed topological summary statistics. When applied to a cohort of GBM patients, we find that the SECT is a better predictor of clinical outcomes than both existing tumor shape quantifications and common molecular assays. Specifically, we demonstrate that SECT features alone explain more of the variance in GBM patient survival than gene expression, volumetric features, and morphometric features. The main takeaways from our findings are thus twofold. First, they suggest that images contain valuable information that can play an important role in clinical prognosis and other medical decisions. Second, they show that the SECT is a viable tool for the broader study of medical imaging informatics.
  • Algorithmic composition of music has a long history and with the development of powerful deep learning methods, there has recently been increased interest in exploring algorithms and models to create art. We explore the utility of state space models, in particular hidden Markov models (HMMs) and variants, in composing classical piano pieces from the Romantic era and consider the models' ability to generate new pieces that sound like they were composed by a human. We find that the models we explored are fairly successful at generating new pieces that have largely consonant harmonies, especially when trained on original pieces with simple harmonic structure. However, we conclude that the major limitation in using these models to generate music that sounds like it was composed by a human is the lack of melodic progression in the composed pieces. We also examine the performance of the models in the context of music theory.
  • Linear mixed models (LMMs) are used extensively to model dependecies of observations in linear regression and are used extensively in many application areas. Parameter estimation for LMMs can be computationally prohibitive on big data. State-of-the-art learning algorithms require computational complexity which depends at least linearly on the dimension $p$ of the covariates, and often use heuristics that do not offer theoretical guarantees. We present scalable algorithms for learning high-dimensional LMMs with sublinear computational complexity dependence on $p$. Key to our approach are novel dual estimators which use only kernel functions of the data, and fast computational techniques based on the subsampled randomized Hadamard transform. We provide theoretical guarantees for our learning algorithms, demonstrating the robustness of parameter estimation. Finally, we complement the theory with experiments on large synthetic and real data.
  • We present a new Gaussian process (GP) regression model where the covariance kernel is indexed or parameterized by a sufficient dimension reduction subspace of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. The covariance kernel will be low-rank while capturing the statistical dependency of the response to the covariates, this affords significant improvement in computational efficiency as well as potential reduction in the variance of predictions. We develop a fast Expectation-Maximization algorithm for estimating the parameters of the subspace-induced Gaussian process (SIGP). Extensive results on real data show that SIGP can outperform the standard full GP even with a low rank-$m$, $m\leq 3$, inducing subspace.
  • The Markov Chain Monte Carlo method is the dominant paradigm for posterior computation in Bayesian analysis. It is common to control computation time by making approximations to the Markov transition kernel. Comparatively little attention has been paid to computational optimality in these approximating Markov Chains, or when such approximations are justified relative to obtaining shorter paths from the exact kernel. We give simple, sharp bounds for uniform approximations of uniformly mixing Markov chains. We then suggest a notion of optimality that incorporates computation time and approximation error, and use our bounds to make generalizations about properties of good approximations in the uniformly mixing setting. The relevance of these properties is demonstrated in applications to a minibatching-based approximate MCMC algorithm for large $n$ logistic regression and low-rank approximations for Gaussian processes.
  • We present an efficient algorithm for learning mixed membership models when the number of variables $p$ is much larger than the number of hidden components $k$. This algorithm reduces the computational complexity of state-of-the-art tensor methods, which require decomposing an $O\left(p^3\right)$ tensor, to factorizing $O\left(p/k\right)$ sub-tensors each of size $O\left(k^3\right)$. In addition, we address the issue of negative entries in the empirical method of moments based estimators. We provide sufficient conditions under which our approach has provable guarantees. Our approach obtains competitive empirical results on both simulated and real data.
  • Nonlinear kernel regression models are often used in statistics and machine learning because they are more accurate than linear models. Variable selection for kernel regression models is a challenge partly because, unlike the linear regression setting, there is no clear concept of an effect size for regression coefficients. In this paper, we propose a novel framework that provides an effect size analog of each explanatory variable for Bayesian kernel regression models when the kernel is shift-invariant --- for example, the Gaussian kernel. We use function analytic properties of shift-invariant reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS) to define a linear vector space that: (i) captures nonlinear structure, and (ii) can be projected onto the original explanatory variables. The projection onto the original explanatory variables serves as an analog of effect sizes. The specific function analytic property we use is that shift-invariant kernel functions can be approximated via random Fourier bases. Based on the random Fourier expansion we propose a computationally efficient class of Bayesian approximate kernel regression (BAKR) models for both nonlinear regression and binary classification for which one can compute an analog of effect sizes. We illustrate the utility of BAKR by examining two important problems in statistical genetics: genomic selection (i.e. phenotypic prediction) and association mapping (i.e. inference of significant variants or loci). State-of-the-art methods for genomic selection and association mapping are based on kernel regression and linear models, respectively. BAKR is the first method that is competitive in both settings.
  • We develop a geometric framework that characterizes the synchronization problem --- the problem of consistently registering or aligning a collection of objects. The theory we formulate characterizes the cohomological nature of synchronization based on the classical theory of fibre bundles. We first establish the correspondence between synchronization problems in a topological group $G$ over a connected graph $\Gamma$ and the moduli space of flat principal $G$-bundles over $\Gamma$, and develop a discrete analogy of the renowned theorem of classifying flat principal bundles with fix base and structural group using the representation variety. In particular, we show that prescribing an edge potential on a graph is equivalent to specifying an equivalence class of flat principal bundles, of which the triviality of holonomy dictates the synchronizability of the edge potential. We then develop a twisted cohomology theory for associated vector bundles of the flat principal bundle arising from an edge potential, which is a discrete version of the twisted cohomology in differential geometry. This theory realizes the obstruction to synchronizability as a cohomology group of the twisted de Rham cochain complex. We then build a discrete twisted Hodge theory --- a fibre bundle analog of the discrete Hodge theory on graphs --- which geometrically realizes the graph connection Laplacian as a Hodge Laplacian of degree zero. Motivated by our geometric framework, we study the problem of learning group actions --- partitioning a collection of objects based on the local synchronizability of pairwise correspondence relations. A dual interpretation is to learn finitely generated subgroups of an ambient transformation group from noisy observed group elements. A synchronization-based algorithm is also provided, and we demonstrate its efficacy using simulations and real data.
  • We introduce a consistent estimator for the homology (an algebraic structure representing connected components and cycles) of level sets of both density and regression functions. Our method is based on kernel estimation. We apply this procedure to two problems: (1) inferring the homology structure of manifolds from noisy observations, (2) inferring the persistent homology (a multi-scale extension of homology) of either density or regression functions. We prove consistency for both of these problems. In addition to the theoretical results, we demonstrate these methods on simulated data for binary regression and clustering applications.
  • We develop a generalized method of moments (GMM) approach for fast parameter estimation in a new class of Dirichlet latent variable models with mixed data types. Parameter estimation via GMM has been demonstrated to have computational and statistical advantages over alternative methods, such as expectation maximization, variational inference, and Markov chain Monte Carlo. The key computational advan- tage of our method (MELD) is that parameter estimation does not require instantiation of the latent variables. Moreover, a representational advantage of the GMM approach is that the behavior of the model is agnostic to distributional assumptions of the observations. We derive population moment conditions after marginalizing out the sample-specific Dirichlet latent variables. The moment conditions only depend on component mean parameters. We illustrate the utility of our approach on simulated data, comparing results from MELD to alternative methods, and we show the promise of our approach through the application of MELD to several data sets.
  • Latent factor models are the canonical statistical tool for exploratory analyses of low-dimensional linear structure for an observation matrix with p features across n samples. We develop a structured Bayesian group factor analysis model that extends the factor model to multiple coupled observation matrices; in the case of two observations, this reduces to a Bayesian model of canonical correlation analysis. The main contribution of this work is to carefully define a structured Bayesian prior that encourages both element-wise and column-wise shrinkage and leads to desirable behavior on high-dimensional data. In particular, our model puts a structured prior on the joint factor loading matrix, regularizing at three levels, which enables element-wise sparsity and unsupervised recovery of latent factors corresponding to structured variance across arbitrary subsets of the observations. In addition, our structured prior allows for both dense and sparse latent factors so that covariation among either all features or only a subset of features can both be recovered. We use fast parameter-expanded expectation-maximization for parameter estimation in this model. We validate our method on both simulated data with substantial structure and real data, comparing against a number of state-of-the-art approaches. These results illustrate useful properties of our model, including i) recovering sparse signal in the presence of dense effects; ii) the ability to scale naturally to large numbers of observations; iii) flexible observation- and factor-specific regularization to recover factors with a wide variety of sparsity levels and percentage of variance explained; and iv) tractable inference that scales to modern genomic and document data sizes.
  • We introduce a Bayesian model for inferring mixtures of subspaces of different dimensions. The key challenge in such a mixture model is specification of prior distributions over subspaces of different dimensions. We address this challenge by embedding subspaces or Grassmann manifolds into a sphere of relatively low dimension and specifying priors on the sphere. We provide an efficient sampling algorithm for the posterior distribution of the model parameters. We illustrate that a simple extension of our mixture of subspaces model can be applied to topic modeling. We also prove posterior consistency for the mixture of subspaces model. The utility of our approach is demonstrated with applications to real and simulated data.
  • Long term behavior of nonlinear deterministic continuous time signals can be studied in terms of their reconstructed attractors. Reconstructed attractors of a continuous signal are meant to be topologically equivalent representations of the dynamics of the unknown dynamical system which generates the signal. Sometimes, geometry of the attractor or its complexity may give important information on the system of interest. However, if the trajectories of the attractor behave as if they are not coming from continuous system or there exists many spike like structures on the path of the system trajectories, then there is no way to characterize the shape of the attractor. In this article, the traditional attractor reconstruction method is first used for two types of ECG signals: Normal healthy persons (NHP) and Congestive Heart failure patients (CHFP). As common in such a framework, the reconstructed attractors are not at all well formed and hence it is not possible to adequately characterize their geometrical features. Thus, we incorporate frequency domain information to the given time signals. This is done by transforming the signals to a time frequency domain by means of suitable Wavelet transforms (WT). The transformed signal concerns two non homogeneous variables and is still quite difficult to use to reconstruct some dynamics out of it. By applying a suitable mapping, this signal is further converted into integer domain and a new type of 3D plot, called integer lag plot, which characterizes and distinguishes the ECG signals of NHP and CHFP, is finally obtained.
  • The complexity of a signal can be measured by the Recurrence period density entropy (RPDE) from the reconstructed phase space. We have chosen a window based RPDE method for the classification of signals, as RPDE is an average entropic measure of the whole phase space. We have observed the changes in the complexity in cardiac signals of normal healthy person (NHP) and congestive heart failure patients (CHFP). The results show that the cardiac dynamics of a healthy subject is more complex and random compare to the same for a heart failure patient, whose dynamics is more deterministic. We have constructed a general threshold to distinguish the border line between a healthy and a congestive heart failure dynamics. The results may be useful for wide range for physiological and biomedical analysis.
  • The scalability of statistical estimators is of increasing importance in modern applications. One approach to implementing scalable algorithms is to compress data into a low dimensional latent space using dimension reduction methods. In this paper we develop an approach for dimension reduction that exploits the assumption of low rank structure in high dimensional data to gain both computational and statistical advantages. We adapt recent randomized low-rank approximation algorithms to provide an efficient solution to principal component analysis (PCA), and we use this efficient solver to improve parameter estimation in large-scale linear mixed models (LMM) for association mapping in statistical and quantitative genomics. A key observation in this paper is that randomization serves a dual role, improving both computational and statistical performance by implicitly regularizing the covariance matrix estimate of the random effect in a LMM. These statistical and computational advantages are highlighted in our experiments on simulated data and large-scale genomic studies.
  • A parametrization of hypergraphs based on the geometry of points in $\mathbf{R}^d$ is developed. Informative prior distributions on hypergraphs are induced through this parametrization by priors on point configurations via spatial processes. This prior specification is used to infer conditional independence models or Markov structure of multivariate distributions. Specifically, we can recover both the junction tree factorization as well as the hyper Markov law. This approach offers greater control on the distribution of graph features than Erd\"os-R\'enyi random graphs, supports inference of factorizations that cannot be retrieved by a graph alone, and leads to new Metropolis\slash Hastings Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms with both local and global moves in graph space. We illustrate the utility of this parametrization and prior specification using simulations.
  • We consider the asymptotic consistency of maximum likelihood parameter estimation for dynamical systems observed with noise. Under suitable conditions on the dynamical systems and the observations, we show that maximum likelihood parameter estimation is consistent. Our proof involves ideas from both information theory and dynamical systems. Furthermore, we show how some well-studied properties of dynamical systems imply the general statistical properties related to maximum likelihood estimation. Finally, we exhibit classical families of dynamical systems for which maximum likelihood estimation is consistent. Examples include shifts of finite type with Gibbs measures and Axiom A attractors with SRB measures.
  • In order to use persistence diagrams as a true statistical tool, it would be very useful to have a good notion of mean and variance for a set of diagrams. In 2011, Mileyko and his collaborators made the first study of the properties of the Fr\'echet mean in $(\mathcal{D}_p,W_p)$, the space of persistence diagrams equipped with the p-th Wasserstein metric. In particular, they showed that the Fr\'echet mean of a finite set of diagrams always exists, but is not necessarily unique. The means of a continuously-varying set of diagrams do not themselves (necessarily) vary continuously, which presents obvious problems when trying to extend the Fr\'echet mean definition to the realm of vineyards. We fix this problem by altering the original definition of Fr\'echet mean so that it now becomes a probability measure on the set of persistence diagrams; in a nutshell, the mean of a set of diagrams will be a weighted sum of atomic measures, where each atom is itself a persistence diagram determined using a perturbation of the input diagrams. This definition gives for each $N$ a map $(\mathcal{D}_p)^N \to \mathbb{P}(\mathcal{D}_p)$. We show that this map is H\"older continuous on finite diagrams and thus can be used to build a useful statistic on time-varying persistence diagrams, better known as vineyards.
  • Approximation of a continuous dynamics by discrete dynamics in the form of Poincare map is one of the fascinating mathematical tool, which can describe the approximate behaviour of the dynamics of the dynamical system in lesser dimension than the embedding diemnsion. The present article considers a very rare biomedical signal like Electromyography (EMG) signal. It determines suitable time delay and reconstruct the attractor of embedding diemnsion three. By measuring its Lyapunov exponent, the attractor so reconstructed is found to be chaotic. Naturally the Poincare map obtained by corresponding Poincare section is to be chaotic too. This may be verified by calculation of Lyapunov exponent of the map. The main objective of this article is to show that Poincare map exists in this case as a 2D map for a suitable Poincare section only. In fact, the article considers two Poincare sections of the attractor for construction of the Poincare map. It is seen that one such map is chaotic but the other one is not so, both are verified by calculation of Lyapunov exponent of the map.
  • Study of continuous dynamical system through Poincare map is one of the most popular topics in nonlinear analysis. This is done by taking intersections of the orbit of flow by a hyper-plane parallel to one of the coordinate hyper-planes of co-dimension one. Naturally for a 3D-attractor, the Poincare map gives rise to 2D points, which can describe the dynamics of the attractor properly. In a very special case, sometimes these 2D points are considered as their 1D-projections to obtain a 1D map. However, this is an artificial way of reducing the 2D map by dropping one of the variables. Sometimes it is found that the two coordinates of the points on the Poincare section are functionally related. This also reduces the 2D Poincare map to a 1D map. This reduction is natural, and not artificial as mentioned above. In the present study, this issue is being highlighted. In fact, we find out some examples, which show that even this natural reduction of the 2D Poincare map is not always justified, because the resultant 1D map may fail to generate the original dynamics. This proves that to describe the dynamics of the 3D chaotic attractor, the minimum dimension of the Poincare map must be two, in general.
  • The paper introduces new types of nonlinear correlations between bivariate data sets and derives nonlinear auto-correlations on the same data set. These auto-correlations are of different types to match signals with different types of nonlinearities. Examples are cited in all cases to make the definitions meaningful. Next correlogram diagrams are drawn separately in all cases; from these diagrams proper time lags/delays are determined. These give rise to independent coordinates of the attractors. Finally three dimensional attractors are reconstructed in each case separately with the help of these independent coordinates. Moreover for the purpose of making proper distinction between the signals, the attractors so reconstructed are quantified by a new technique called ellipsoid fit.
  • For the purpose of phase space reconstruction from nonlinear time series, delay selection is one of the most vital criteria. This is normally done by using a general measure viz., mutual information (MI). However, in that case, the delay selection is limited to the estimation of a single delay using MI between two variables only. The corresponding reconstructed phase space is also not satisfactory. To overcome the situation, a high-dimensional estimator of the MI is used; it selects more than one delay between more than two variables. The quality of the reconstructed phase space is tested by shape distortion parameter (SD), it is found that even this multidimensional MI sometimes fails to produce a less distorted phase space. In this paper, an alternative nonlinear measure cross autocorrelation (CAC) is introduced. A comparative study is made between the reconstructed phase spaces of a known three dimensional Neuro dynamical model, Lorenz dynamical model and a three dimensional food web model under MI for two and higher dimensions and also under cross auto-correlation separately. It is found that the least distorted phase space is obtained only under the notion of cross autocorrelation.
  • Signal analysis is one of the finest scientific techniques in communication theory. Some quantitative and qualitative measures describe the pattern of a music signal, vary from one to another. Same musical recital, when played by different instrumentalists, generates different types of music patterns. The reason behind various patterns is the psychoacoustic measures - Dynamics, Timber, Tonality and Rhythm, varies in each time. However, the psycho-acoustic study of the music signals does not reveal any idea about the similarity between the signals. For such cases, study of synchronization of long-term nonlinear dynamics may provide effective results. In this context, phase synchronization (PS) is one of the measures to show synchronization between two non-identical signals. In fact, it is very critical to investigate any other kind of synchronization for experimental condition, because those are completely non identical signals. Also, there exists equivalence between the phases and the distances of the diagonal line in Recurrence plot (RP) of the signals, which is quantifiable by the recurrence quantification measure tau-recurrence rate. This paper considers two nonlinear music signals based on same raga played by two eminent sitar instrumentalists as two non-identical sources. The psycho-acoustic study shows how the Dynamics, Timber, Tonality and Rhythm vary for the two music signals. Then, long term analysis in the form of phase space reconstruction is performed, which reveals the chaotic phase spaces for both the signals. From the RP of both the phase spaces, tau-recurrence rate is calculated. Finally by the correlation of normalized tau-recurrence rate of their 3D phase spaces and the PS of the two music signals has been established. The numerical results well support the analysis.
  • In this paper we introduce a statistic, the persistent homology transform (PHT), to model surfaces in $\mathbb{R}^3$ and shapes in $\mathbb{R}^2$. This statistic is a collection of persistence diagrams - multiscale topological summaries used extensively in topological data analysis. We use the PHT to represent shapes and execute operations such as computing distances between shapes or classifying shapes. We prove the map from the space of simplicial complexes in $\mathbb{R}^3$ into the space spanned by this statistic is injective. This implies that the statistic is a sufficient statistic for probability densities on the space of piecewise linear shapes. We also show that a variant of this statistic, the Euler Characteristic Transform (ECT), admits a simple exponential family formulation which is of use in providing likelihood based inference for shapes and surfaces. We illustrate the utility of this statistic on simulated and real data.
  • X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going from protein to structure. In practice, the crystallization process proceeds through knowledge-informed empiricism. Better physico-chemical understanding remains elusive because of the large number of variables involved, hence little guidance is available to systematically identify solution conditions that promote crystallization. To help determine relationships between macromolecular properties and their crystallization propensity, we have trained statistical models on samples for 182 proteins supplied by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium. Gaussian processes, which capture trends beyond the reach of linear statistical models, distinguish between two main physico-chemical mechanisms driving crystallization. One is characterized by low levels of side chain entropy and has been extensively reported in the literature. The other identifies specific electrostatic interactions not previously described in the crystallization context. Because evidence for two distinct mechanisms can be gleaned both from crystal contacts and from solution conditions leading to successful crystallization, the model offers future avenues for optimizing crystallization screens based on partial structural information. The availability of crystallization data coupled with structural outcomes analyzed through state-of-the-art statistical models may thus guide macromolecular crystallization toward a more rational basis.