• Various fundamental-physics experiments such as measurement of the birefringence of the vacuum, searches for ultralight dark matter (e.g., axions), and precision spectroscopy of complex systems (including exotic atoms containing antimatter constituents) are enabled by high-field magnets. We give an overview of current and future experiments and discuss the state-of-the-art DC- and pulsed-magnet technologies and prospects for future developments.
  • We report 65 tesla magneto-absorption spectroscopy of exciton Rydberg states in the archetypal monolayer semiconductor WSe$_2$. The strongly field-dependent and distinct energy shifts of the 2s, 3s, and 4s excited neutral excitons permits their unambiguous identification and allows for quantitative comparison with leading theoretical models. Both the sizes (via low-field diamagnetic shifts) and the energies of the $ns$ exciton states agree remarkably well with detailed numerical simulations using the non-hydrogenic screened Keldysh potential for 2D semiconductors. Moreover, at the highest magnetic fields the nearly-linear diamagnetic shifts of the weakly-bound 3s and 4s excitons provide a direct experimental measure of the exciton's reduced mass, $m_r = 0.20 \pm 0.01~m_0$.
  • Excitons in atomically-thin semiconductors necessarily lie close to a surface, and therefore their properties are expected to be strongly influenced by the surrounding dielectric environment. However, systematic studies exploring this role are challenging, in part because the most readily accessible exciton parameter -- the exciton's optical transition energy -- is largely \textit{un}affected by the surrounding medium. Here we show that the role of the dielectric environment is revealed through its systematic influence on the \textit{size} of the exciton, which can be directly measured via the diamagnetic shift of the exciton transition in high magnetic fields. Using exfoliated WSe$_2$ monolayers affixed to single-mode optical fibers, we tune the surrounding dielectric environment by encapsulating the flakes with different materials, and perform polarized low-temperature magneto-absorption studies to 65~T. The systematic increase of the exciton's size with dielectric screening, and concurrent reduction in binding energy (also inferred from these measurements), is quantitatively compared with leading theoretical models. These results demonstrate how exciton properties can be tuned in future 2D optoelectronic devices.
  • We describe recent experimental efforts to perform polarization-resolved optical spectroscopy of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide semiconductors in very large pulsed magnetic fields to 65 tesla. The experimental setup and technical challenges are discussed in detail, and temperature-dependent magneto-reflection spectra from atomically thin tungsten disulphide (WS$_2$) are presented. The data clearly reveal not only the valley Zeeman effect in these 2D semiconductors, but also the small quadratic exciton diamagnetic shift from which the very small exciton size can be directly inferred. Finally, we present model calculations that demonstrate how the measured diamagnetic shifts can be used to constrain estimates of the exciton binding energy in this new family of monolayer semiconductors.
  • We report a systematic study of coherent spin precession and spin dephasing in electron-doped monolayer MoS$_2$. Using time-resolved Kerr rotation spectroscopy and applied in-plane magnetic fields, a nanosecond-timescale Larmor spin precession signal commensurate with $g$-factor $|g_0|\simeq 1.86$ is observed in several different MoS$_2$ samples grown by chemical vapor deposition. The dephasing rate of this oscillatory signal increases linearly with magnetic field, suggesting that the coherence arises from a sub-ensemble of localized electron spins having an inhomogeneously-broadened distribution of $g$-factors, $g_0 + \Delta g$. In contrast to $g_0$, $\Delta g$ is sample-dependent and ranges from 0.042 to 0.115.
  • We report circularly-polarized optical reflection spectroscopy of monolayer WS$_2$ and MoS$_2$ at low temperatures (4~K) and in high magnetic fields to 65~T. Both the A and the B exciton transitions exhibit a clear and very similar Zeeman splitting of approximately $-$230~$\mu$eV/T ($g\simeq -4$), providing the first measurements of the valley Zeeman effect and associated $g$-factors in monolayer transition-metal disulphides. These results complement and are compared with recent low-field photoluminescence measurements of valley degeneracy breaking in the monolayer diselenides MoSe$_2$ and WSe$_2$. Further, the very large magnetic fields used in our studies allows us to observe the small quadratic diamagnetic shifts of the A and B excitons in monolayer WS$_2$ (0.32 and 0.11~$\mu$eV/T$^2$, respectively), from which we calculate exciton radii of 1.53~nm and 1.16~nm. When analyzed within a model of non-local dielectric screening in monolayer semiconductors, these diamagnetic shifts also constrain and provide estimates of the exciton binding energies (410~meV and 470~meV for the A and B excitons, respectively), further highlighting the utility of high magnetic fields for understanding new 2D materials.
  • The recently-discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provide a fertile playground to explore new coupled spin-valley physics. Although robust spin and valley degrees of freedom are inferred from polarized photoluminescence (PL) experiments, PL timescales are necessarily constrained by short-lived (3-100ps) electron-hole recombination. Direct probes of spin/valley polarization dynamics of resident carriers in electron (or hole) doped TMDCs, which may persist long after recombination ceases, are at an early stage. Here we directly measure the coupled spin-valley dynamics in electron-doped MoS_2 and WS_2 monolayers using optical Kerr spectroscopy, and unambiguously reveal very long electron spin lifetimes exceeding 3ns at 5K (2-3 orders of magnitude longer than typical exciton recombination times). In contrast with conventional III-V or II-VI semiconductors, spin relaxation accelerates rapidly in small transverse magnetic fields. Supported by a model of coupled spin-valley dynamics, these results indicate a novel mechanism of itinerant electron spin dephasing in the rapidly-fluctuating internal spin-orbit field in TMDCs, driven by fast intervalley scattering. Additionally, a long-lived spin coherence is observed at lower energies, commensurate with localized states. These studies provide crucial insight into the physics underpinning spin and valley dynamics of resident electrons in atomically-thin TMDCs.
  • The effect of a magnetic field on the electroluminescence of organic light emitting devices originates from the hyperfine interaction between the electron/hole polarons and the hydrogen nuclei of the host molecules. In this paper, we present an analytical theory of magneto-electroluminescence for organic semiconductors. To be specific, we focus on bilayer heterostructure devices. In the case we are considering, light generation at the interface of the donor and acceptor layers results from the formation and recombination of exciplexes. The spin physics is described by a stochastic Liouville equation for the electron/hole spin density matrix. By finding the steady-state analytical solution using Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory, we explore how the singlet/triplet exciplex ratio is affected by the hyperfine interaction strength and by the external magnetic field. To validate the theory, spectrally-resolved electroluminescence experiments on BPhen/m-MTDATA devices are analyzed. With increasing emission wavelength, the width of the magnetic field modulation curve of the electroluminescence increases while its depth decreases. These observations are consistent with the model. Finally, the analytical theory is extended to account for an additional low-field structure due to the exchange interaction in the weakly bound polaron-pair states.
  • We develop and apply a minimally invasive approach for characterization of inter-species spin interactions by detecting spin fluctuations alone. We consider a heterogeneous two-component spin ensemble in thermal equilibrium that interacts via binary exchange coupling, and we determine cross-correlations between the intrinsic spin fluctuations exhibited by the two species. Our theoretical predictions are experimentally confirmed using `two-color' optical spin noise spectroscopy on a mixture of interacting Rb and Cs alkali vapors. The results allow us to explore the rates of spin exchange and total spin relaxation under conditions of strict thermodynamic equilibrium.
  • The intrinsic fluctuations of electron spins in semiconductors and atomic vapors generate a small, randomly-varying "spin noise" that can be detected by sensitive optical methods such as Faraday rotation. Recent studies have demonstrated that the frequency, linewidth, and lineshape of this spin noise directly reveals dynamical spin properties such as dephasing times, relaxation mechanisms and g-factors without perturbing the spins away from equilibrium. Here we demonstrate that spin noise measurements using wavelength-tunable probe light forms the basis of a powerful and novel spectroscopic tool to provide unique information that is fundamentally inaccessible via conventional linear optics. In particular, the wavelength dependence of the detected spin noise power can reveal homogeneous linewidths buried within inhomogeneously-broadened optical spectra, and can resolve overlapping optical transitions belonging to different spin systems. These new possibilities are explored both theoretically and via experiments on spin systems in opposite limits of inhomogeneous broadening (alkali atom vapors and semiconductor quantum dots).
  • Strong geometrical frustration in magnets leads to exotic states, such as spin liquids, spin supersolids and complex magnetic textures. SrCu2(BO3)2, a spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet in the archetypical Shastry-Sutherland lattice, exhibits a rich spectrum of magnetization plateaus and stripe-like magnetic textures in applied fields. The structure of these plateaus is still highly controversial due to the intrinsic complexity associated with frustration and competing length scales. We reveal new magnetic textures in SrCu2(BO3)2 via magnetostriction and magnetocaloric measurements in fields up to 97.4 Tesla. In addition to observing the low-field fine structure of the plateaus with unprecedented resolution, the data also reveal lattice responses at 82 T and at 73.6 T which we attribute, using a controlled density matrix renormalization group approach, to the long-predicted 1/2-saturation plateau, and to a new 2/5 plateau.
  • Magnetic doping of semiconductor nanostructures is actively pursued for applications in magnetic memory and spin-based electronics. Central to these efforts is a drive to control the interaction strength between carriers (electrons and holes) and the embedded magnetic atoms. In this respect, colloidal nanocrystal heterostructures provide great flexibility via growth-controlled `engineering' of electron and hole wavefunctions within individual nanocrystals. Here we demonstrate a widely tunable magnetic sp-d exchange interaction between electron-hole excitations (excitons) and paramagnetic manganese ions using `inverted' core-shell nanocrystals composed of Mn-doped ZnSe cores overcoated with undoped shells of narrower-gap CdSe. Magnetic circular dichroism studies reveal giant Zeeman spin splittings of the band-edge exciton that, surprisingly, are tunable in both magnitude and sign. Effective exciton g-factors are controllably tuned from -200 to +30 solely by increasing the CdSe shell thickness, demonstrating that strong quantum confinement and wavefunction engineering in heterostructured nanocrystal materials can be utilized to manipulate carrier-Mn wavefunction overlap and the sp-d exchange parameters themselves.
  • We present a general derivation of the electron spin noise power spectrum in alkali gases as measured by optical Faraday rotation, which applies to both classical gases at high temperatures as well as ultracold quantum gases. We show that the spin-noise power spectrum is determined by an electron spin-spin correlation function, and we find that measurements of the spin-noise power spectra for a classical gas of $^{41}$K atoms are in good agreement with the predicted values. Experimental and theoretical spin noise spectra are directly and quantitatively compared in both longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields up to the high magnetic field regime (where Zeeman energies exceed the intrinsic hyperfine energy splitting of the $^{41}$K ground state).
  • Ultracold alkali atoms provide experimentally accessible model systems for probing quantum states that manifest themselves at the macroscopic scale. Recent experimental realizations of superfluidity in dilute gases of ultracold fermionic (half-integer spin) atoms offer exciting opportunities to directly test theoretical models of related many-body fermion systems that are inaccessible to experimental manipulation, such as neutron stars and quark-gluon plasmas. However, the microscopic interactions between fermions are potentially quite complex, and experiments in ultracold gases to date cannot clearly distinguish between the qualitatively different microscopic models that have been proposed. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that optical measurements of electron spin noise -- the intrinsic, random fluctuations of spin -- can probe the entangled quantum states of ultracold fermionic atomic gases and unambiguously reveal the detailed nature of the interatomic interactions. We show that different models predict different sets of resonances in the noise spectrum, and once the correct effective interatomic interaction model is identified, the line-shapes of the spin noise can be used to constrain this model. Further, experimental measurements of spin noise in classical (Boltzmann) alkali vapors are used to estimate the expected signal magnitudes for spin noise measurements in ultracold atom systems and to show that these measurements are feasible.
  • We study spectrally resolved dynamics of Forster energy transfer in single monolayers and bilayers of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots assembled using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) techniques. For a single monolayer, we observe a distribution of transfer times from ~50 ps to ~10 ns, which can be quantitatively modeled assuming that the energy transfer is dominated by interactions of a donor nanocrystal with acceptor nanocrystals from the first three shells surrounding the donor. We also detect an effective enhancement of the absorption cross section (up to a factor of 4) for larger nanocrystals on the red side of the size distribution, which results from strong, inter-dot electrostatic coupling in the LB film (the light-harvesting antenna effect). By assembling bilayers of nanocrystals of two different sizes, we are able to improve the donor-acceptor spectral overlap for engineered transfer in a specific (vertical) direction. These bilayers show a fast, unidirectional energy flow with a time constant of ~120 ps.