• The color sensation evoked by an object depends on both the spectral power distribution of the illumination and the reflectance properties of the object being illuminated. The color sensation can be characterized by three color-space values, such as XYZ, RGB, HSV, L*a*b*, etc. It is straightforward to compute the three values given the illuminant and reflectance curves. The converse process of computing a reflectance curve given the color-space values and the illuminant is complicated by the fact that an infinite number of different reflectance curves can give rise to a single set of color-space values (metamerism). This paper presents five algorithms for generating a reflectance curve from a specified sRGB triplet, written for a general audience. The algorithms are designed to generate reflectance curves that are similar to those found with naturally occurring colored objects. The computed reflectance curves are compared to a database of thousands of reflectance curves measured from paints and pigments available both commercially and in nature, and the similarity is quantified. One particularly useful application of these algorithms is in the field of computer graphics, where modeling color transformations sometimes requires wavelength-specific information, such as when modeling subtractive color mixture.
  • Modeling subtractive color mixture (e.g., the way that paints mix) is difficult when working with colors described only by three-dimensional color space values, such as RGB. Although RGB values are sufficient to describe a specific color sensation, they do not contain enough information to predict the RGB color that would result from a subtractive mixture of two specified RGB colors. Methods do exist for accurately modeling subtractive mixture, such as the Kubelka-Munk equations, but require extensive spectrophotometric measurements of the mixed components, making them unsuitable for many computer graphics applications. This paper presents a strategy for modeling subtractive color mixture given only the RGB information of the colors being mixed, written for a general audience. The RGB colors are first transformed to generic, representative spectral distributions, and then this spectral information is used to perform the subtractive mixture, using the weighted arithmetic-geometric mean. This strategy provides reasonable, representative subtractive mixture colors with only modest computational effort and no experimental measurements. As such, it provides a useful way to model subtractive color mixture in computer graphics applications.