• The study of binary pulsars enables tests of general relativity. Orbital motion in binary systems causes the apparent pulsar spin frequency to drift, reducing the sensitivity of periodicity searches. Acceleration searches are methods that account for the effect of orbital acceleration. Existing methods are currently computationally expensive, and the vast amount of data that will be produced by next generation instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) necessitates real-time acceleration searches, which in turn requires the use of High Performance Computing (HPC) platforms. We present our implementation of the Correlation Technique for the Fourier Domain Acceleration Search (FDAS) algorithm on Graphics Processor Units (GPUs). The correlation technique is applied as a convolution with multiple Finite Impulse Response filters in the Fourier domain. Two approaches are compared: the first uses the NVIDIA cuFFT library for applying Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) on the GPU, and the second contains a custom FFT implementation in GPU shared memory. We find that the FFT shared memory implementation performs between 1.5 and 3.2 times faster than our cuFFT-based application for smaller but sufficient filter sizes. It is also 4 to 6 times faster than the existing GPU and OpenMP implementations of FDAS. This work is part of the AstroAccelerate project, a many-core accelerated time-domain signal processing library for radio astronomy.
  • We present high-precision timing data over time spans of up to 11 years for 45 millisecond pulsars observed as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project, aimed at detecting and characterizing low-frequency gravitational waves. The pulsars were observed with the Arecibo Observatory and/or the Green Bank Telescope at frequencies ranging from 327 MHz to 2.3 GHz. Most pulsars were observed with approximately monthly cadence, with six high--timing-precision pulsars observed weekly, and all were observed at widely separated frequencies at each observing epoch in order to fit for time-variable dispersion delays. We describe our methods for data processing, time-of-arrival (TOA) calculation, and the implementation of a new, automated method for removing outlier TOAs. We fit a timing model for each pulsar that includes spin, astrometric, and, if necessary, binary parameters, in addition to time-variable dispersion delays and parameters that quantify pulse-profile evolution with frequency. The new timing solutions provide three new parallax measurements, two new Shapiro delay measurements, and two new measurements of large orbital-period variations. We fit models that characterize sources of noise for each pulsar. We find that 11 pulsars show significant red noise, with generally smaller spectral indices than typically measured for non-recycled pulsars, possibly suggesting a different origin. Future papers will use these data to constrain or detect the signatures of gravitational-wave signals.
  • Black widows and redbacks are binary systems consisting of a millisecond pulsar in a close binary with a companion having matter driven off of its surface by the pulsar wind. X-rays due to an intra-binary shock have been observed from many of these systems, as well as orbital variations in the optical emission from the companion due to heating and tidal distortion. We have been systematically studying these systems in radio, optical and X-rays. Here we will present an overview of X-ray and optical studies of these systems, including new XMM-Newton and NuStar data obtained from several of them, along with new optical photometry.
  • The precise localization of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB 121102) has provided the first unambiguous association (chance coincidence probability $p\lesssim3\times10^{-4}$) of an FRB with an optical and persistent radio counterpart. We report on optical imaging and spectroscopy of the counterpart and find that it is an extended ($0.6^{\prime\prime}-0.8^{\prime\prime}$) object displaying prominent Balmer and [OIII] emission lines. Based on the spectrum and emission line ratios, we classify the counterpart as a low-metallicity, star-forming, $m_{r^\prime} = 25.1$ AB mag dwarf galaxy at a redshift of $z=0.19273(8)$, corresponding to a luminosity distance of 972 Mpc. From the angular size, the redshift, and luminosity, we estimate the host galaxy to have a diameter $\lesssim4$ kpc and a stellar mass of $M_*\sim4-7\times 10^{7}\,M_\odot$, assuming a mass-to-light ratio between 2 to 3$\,M_\odot\,L_\odot^{-1}$. Based on the H$\alpha$ flux, we estimate the star formation rate of the host to be $0.4\,M_\odot\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and a substantial host dispersion measure depth $\lesssim 324\,\mathrm{pc\,cm^{-3}}$. The net dispersion measure contribution of the host galaxy to FRB 121102 is likely to be lower than this value depending on geometrical factors. We show that the persistent radio source at FRB 121102's location reported by Marcote et al (2017) is offset from the galaxy's center of light by $\sim$200 mas and the host galaxy does not show optical signatures for AGN activity. If FRB 121102 is typical of the wider FRB population and if future interferometric localizations preferentially find them in dwarf galaxies with low metallicities and prominent emission lines, they would share such a preference with long gamma ray bursts and superluminous supernovae.
  • The National Science Foundation (NSF) Astronomy Division's Portfolio Review of 2012 is no longer relevant to the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of 2017 for two principal reasons, one instrumental and the other astrophysical: 1) The GBT has begun significant operations in the 3mm band, giving it unrivaled capabilities for spectroscopy and continuum studies over 67-116 GHz. It is now an instrument that is unique worldwide and is a critical complement to ALMA for the U.S. scientific community. These capabilities had not been implemented at the time of the review. 2) The detection of gravitational radiation by LIGO in 2015 places the GBT's work on pulsar observations of nano-Hz gravitational radiation at the forefront of modern astrophysics. The Green Bank Telescope of 2017 is not the GBT that was reviewed by the Eisenstein-Miller committee in 2012, a review that was specific to the NSF Astronomy portfolio. The GBT serves a wide spectrum of science areas including physics, chemistry, and planetary studies as well as astronomy. Besides its well-documented intellectual merit, it thus has a significant broader impact. The GBT is making significance advances in our understanding of gravitational waves, the equation-of-state of nuclear matter, the mass of supermassive black holes, the value of H0, and the physics of star-formation, all key science goals for astronomy identified in a recent National Academy study "New Worlds, New Horizons: A Midterm Assessment". In the era of ALMA and LIGO, other countries have bolstered their mm-wave and cm-wave facilities; it is critical that U.S. scientists have ready access to a large filled aperture to remain at the forefront of research.
  • We analyze 24 binary radio pulsars in the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) nine-year data set. We make fourteen significant measurements of Shapiro delay, including new detections in four pulsar-binary systems (PSRs J0613$-$0200, J2017+0603, J2302+4442, and J2317+1439), and derive estimates of the binary-component masses and orbital inclination for these MSP-binary systems. We find a wide range of binary pulsar masses, with values as low as $m_{\rm p} = 1.18^{+0.10}_{-0.09}\text{M}_{\odot}$ for PSR J1918$-$0642 and as high as $m_{\rm p} = 1.928^{+0.017}_{-0.017}\text{M}_{\odot}$ for PSR J1614$-$2230 (both 68.3\% credibility). We make an improved measurement of the Shapiro timing delay in the PSR J1918$-$0642 and J2043+1711 systems, measuring the pulsar mass in the latter system to be $m_{\rm p} = 1.41^{+0.21}_{-0.18}\text{M}_{\odot}$ (68.3\% credibility) for the first time. We measure secular variations of one or more orbital elements in many systems, and use these measurements to further constrain our estimates of the pulsar and companion masses whenever possible. In particular, we used the observed Shapiro delay and periastron advance due to relativistic gravity in the PSR J1903+0327 system to derive a pulsar mass of $m_{\rm p} = 1.65^{+0.02}_{-0.02}\text{M}_{\odot}$ (68.3\% credibility). We discuss the implications that our mass measurements have on the overall neutron-star mass distribution, and on the "mass/orbital-period" correlation due to extended mass transfer.
  • We report on an effort to extract and monitor interstellar scintillation parameters in regular timing observations collected for the NANOGrav pulsar timing array. Scattering delays are measured by creating dynamic spectra for each pulsar and observing epoch of wide-band observations centered near 1500 MHz and carried out at the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory. The ~800-MHz wide frequency bands imply dramatic changes in scintillation bandwidth across the bandpass, and a stretching routine has been included to account for this scaling. For most of the 10 pulsars for which the scaling has been measured, the bandwidths scale with frequency less steeply than expected for a Kolmogorov medium. We find estimated scattering delay values that vary with time by up to an order of magnitude. The mean measured scattering delays are similar to previously published values and slightly higher than predicted by interstellar medium models. We investigate the possibility of increasing the timing precision by mitigating timing errors introduced by the scattering delays. For most of the pulsars, the uncertainty in the time of arrival of a single timing point is much larger than the maximum variation of the scattering delay, suggesting that diffractive scintillation remains only a negligible part of their noise budget.
  • Using the nine-year radio-pulsar timing data set from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), collected at Arecibo Observatory and the Green Bank Telescope, we have measured the positions, proper motions, and parallaxes for 37 millisecond pulsars. We report twelve significant parallax measurements and distance measurements, and eighteen lower limits on distance. We compare these measurements to distances predicted by the NE2001 interstellar electron density model and find them to be in general agreement. We use measured orbital-decay rates and spin-down rates to confirm two of the parallax distances and to place distance upper limits on other sources; these distance limits agree with the parallax distances with one exception, PSR J1024-0719, which we discuss at length. Using the proper motions of the 37 NANOGrav pulsars in combination with other published measurements, we calculate the velocity dispersion of the millisecond pulsar population in Galactocentric coordinates. We find the radial, azimuthal, and perpendicular dispersions to be 46, 40, and 24 km s-1, respectively, in a model that allows for high-velocity outliers; or 81, 58, and 62 km s-1 for the full population. These velocity dispersions are far smaller than those of the canonical pulsar population, and are similar to older Galactic disk populations. This suggests that millisecond pulsar velocities are largely attributable to their being an old population rather than being artifacts of their birth and evolution as neutron star binary systems. The components of these velocity dispersions follow similar proportions to other Galactic populations, suggesting that our results are not biased by selection effects.
  • We are conducting a survey for pulsars and transients using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The GMRT High Resolution Southern Sky (GHRSS) survey is an off-Galactic-plane (|b|>5) survey in the declination range -40 deg to -54 deg at 322 MHz. With the high time (up to 30.72 micro-sec) and frequency (up to 0.016275 MHz) resolution observing modes, the 5-sigma detection limit is 0.5 mJy for a 2 ms pulsar with 10% duty cycle at 322 MHz. Total GHRSS sky coverage of 2866 square-deg, will result from 1953 pointing, each covering 1.8 square-deg. The 10-sigma detection limit for a 5 milli-sec transient burst is 1.6 Jy for the GHRSS survey. In addition, the GHRSS survey can reveal transient events like rotating radio transients or fast radio bursts. With 35% of the survey completed (i.e. 1000 square-deg), we report the discovery of 10 pulsars, one of which is a millisecond pulsar (MSP), one of the highest pulsar per square degree discovery rates for any off-Galactic plane survey. We re-detected 23 known in-beam pulsars. Utilising the imaging capability of the GMRT we also localised 4 of the GHRSS pulsars (including the MSP) in the gated image plane within +/- 10 arc-second. We demonstrated rapid convergence in pulsar timing with a more precise position than is possible with single dish discoveries. We also exhibited that we can localise the brightest transient sources with simultaneously obtained lower time resolution imaging data, demonstrating a technique that may have application in the SKA.
  • PSR J2129-0429 is a "redback" eclipsing millisecond pulsar binary with an unusually long 15.2 hour orbit. It was discovered by the Green Bank Telescope in a targeted search of unidentified Fermi gamma-ray sources. The pulsar companion is optically bright (mean $m_R = 16.6$ mag), allowing us to construct the longest baseline photometric dataset available for such a system. We present ten years of archival and new photometry of the companion from LINEAR, CRTS, PTF, the Palomar 60-inch, and LCOGT. Radial velocity spectroscopy using the Double-Beam Spectrograph on the Palomar 200-inch indicates that the pulsar is massive: $1.74\pm0.18 M_\odot$. The G-type pulsar companion has mass $0.44\pm0.04 M_\odot$, one of the heaviest known redback companions. It is currently 95\% Roche-lobe filling and only mildly irradiated by the pulsar. We identify a clear 13.1 mmag yr$^{-1}$ secular decline in the mean magnitude of the companion as well as smaller-scale variations in the optical lightcurve shape. This behavior may indicate that the companion is cooling. Binary evolution calculations indicate that PSR J2129-0429 has an orbital period almost exactly at the bifurcation period between systems that converge into tighter orbits as black widows and redbacks and those that diverge into wider pulsar--white dwarf binaries. Its eventual fate may depend on whether it undergoes future episodes of mass transfer and increased irradiation.
  • We present the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope discovery of the highly eccentric binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1835$-$3259A in the Fermi Large Area Telescope-detected globular cluster NGC 6652. Timing over one orbit yields the pulse period 3.89 ms, orbital period 9.25 d, eccentricity $\sim 0.95$, and an unusually high companion mass of $0.74\,M_{\odot}$ assuming a $1.4\,M_{\odot}$ pulsar. We caution that the lack of data near periastron prevents a precise measurement of the eccentricity, and that further timing is necessary to constrain this and the other orbital parameters. From tidal considerations, we find that the companion must be a compact object. This system likely formed through an exchange encounter in the dense cluster environment. Our initial timing results predict the measurements of at least two post-Keplerian parameters with long-term phase-connected timing: the rate of periastron advance $\dot{\omega} \sim 0.1^{\circ}\,$yr$^{-1}$, requiring 1 yr of phase connection; and the Einstein delay $\gamma_{\mathrm{GR}} \sim 10\,$ms, requiring 2-3 yr of timing. For an orbital inclination $i > 50^{\circ}$, a measurement of $\sin{i}$ is also likely. PSR J1835$-$3259A thus provides an opportunity to measure the neutron star mass with high precision; to probe the cluster environment; and, depending on the nature of the companion, to investigate the limits of general relativity.
  • We present an algorithm for the simultaneous measurement of a pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM) from folded wideband pulsar data. We extend the prescription from Taylor (1992) to accommodate a general two-dimensional template "portrait", the alignment of which can be used to measure a pulse phase and DM. We show that there is a dedispersion reference frequency that removes the covariance between these two quantities, and note that the recovered pulse profile scaling amplitudes can provide useful information. We experiment with pulse modeling by using a Gaussian-component scheme that allows for independent component evolution with frequency, a "fiducial component", and the inclusion of scattering. We showcase the algorithm using our publicly available code on three years of wideband data from the bright millisecond pulsar J1824-2452A (M28A) from the Green Bank Telescope, and a suite of Monte Carlo analyses validates the algorithm. By using a simple model portrait of M28A we obtain DM trends comparable to those measured by more standard methods, with improved TOA and DM precisions by factors of a few. Measurements from our algorithm will yield precisions at least as good as those from traditional techniques, but is prone to fewer systematic effects and is without ad hoc parameters. A broad application of this new method for dispersion measure tracking with modern large-bandwidth observing systems should improve the timing residuals for pulsar timing array experiments, like the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves.
  • The recycled pulsar PSR J2222-0137 is one of the closest known neutron stars, with a parallax distance of $267_{-0.9}^{+1.2}\,$pc and an edge-on orbit. We measure the Shapiro delay in the system through pulsar timing with the Green Bank Telescope, deriving a low pulsar mass ($1.20\pm0.14$ $M_\odot$) and a high companion mass ($1.05\pm0.06$ $M_\odot$) consistent with either a low-mass neutron star or a high-mass white dwarf. We can largely reject the neutron star hypothesis on the basis of the system's extremely low eccentricity (3e-4) - too low to have been the product of two supernovae under normal circumstances. However, despite deep optical and near-infrared searches with SOAR and the Keck telescopes we have not discovered the optical counterpart of the system. This is consistent with the white dwarf hypothesis only if the effective temperature is <3000 K, a limit that is robust to distance, mass, and atmosphere uncertainties. This would make the companion to PSR J2222-0137 one of the coolest white dwarfs ever observed. For the implied age to be consistent with the age of the Milky Way requires the white dwarf to have already crystallized and entered the faster Debye-cooling regime.
  • Eclipsing millisecond pulsars in close ($P_b < 1$~day) binary systems provide a different view of pulsar winds and shocks than do isolated pulsars. Since 2009, the numbers of these systems known in the Galactic field has increased enormously. We have been systematically studying many of these newly discovered systems at multiple wavelengths. Typically, the companion is nearly Roche-lobe filling and heated by the pulsar which drives mass loss from the companion. The pulsar wind shocks with this material just above the surface of the companion. We discuss various observational properties of this shock, including radio eclipses, orbitally modulated X-ray emission, and the potential for $\gamma$-ray emission. Redbacks, whose companions are likely non-degenerate and significantly more massive, generally have more luminous shocks than black widows which have very low mass companions. This is expected since the more massive redback companions intercept a greater fraction of the pulsar wind. We also compare these systems to accreting millisecond pulsars, which may be progenitors of black widows and in some cases can pass back and forth between redback and accretion phases.
  • The hierarchical triple system PSR J0337+1715 offers an unprecedented laboratory to study secular evolution of interacting systems and to explore the complicated mass-transfer history that forms millisecond pulsars and helium-core white dwarfs. The latter in particular, however, requires knowledge of the properties of the individual components of the system. Here we present precise optical spectroscopy of the inner companion in the PSR J0337+1715 system. We confirm it as a hot, low-gravity DA white dwarf with Teff=15,800+/-100 K and log(g)=5.82+/-0.05. We also measure an inner mass ratio of 0.1364+/-0.0015, entirely consistent with that inferred from pulsar timing, and a systemic radial velocity of 29.7+/-0.3 km/s. Combined with the mass (0.19751 Msun) determined from pulsar timing, our measurement of the surface gravity implies a radius of 0.091+/-0.005 Rsun; combined further with the effective temperature and extinction, the photometry implies a distance of 1300+/-80 pc. The high temperature of the companion is somewhat puzzling: with current models, it likely requires a recent period of unstable hydrogen burning, and suggests a surprisingly short lifetime for objects at this phase in their evolution. We discuss the implications of these measurements in the context of understanding the PSR J0337+1715 system, as well as of low-mass white dwarfs in general.
  • We observed the Crab pulsar with the 43-m telescope in Green Bank, WV over a timespan of 15 months. In total we obtained 100 hours of data at 1.2 GHz and seven hours at 330 MHz, resulting in a sample of about 95000 giant pulses (GPs). This is the largest sample, to date, of GPs from the Crab pulsar taken with the same telescope and backend and analyzed as one data set. We calculated power-law fits to amplitude distributions for main pulse (MP) and interpulse (IP) GPs, resulting in indices in the range of 2.1-3.1 for MP GPs at 1.2 GHz and in the range of 2.5-3.0 and 2.4-3.1 for MP and IP GPs at 330 MHz. We also correlated the GPs at 1.2 GHz with GPs from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), which were obtained simultaneously at a higher frequency (8.9 GHz) over a span of 26 hours. In total, 7933 GPs from the 43-m telescope at 1.2 GHz and 39900 GPs from the GBT were recorded during these contemporaneous observations. At 1.2 GHz, 236 (3%) MP GPs and 23 (5%) IP GPs were detected at 8.9 GHz, both with zero chance probability. Another 15 (4%) low-frequency IP GPs were detected within one spin period of high-frequency IP GPs, with a chance probability of 9%. This indicates that the emission processes at high and low radio frequencies are related, despite significant pulse profile shape differences. The 43-m GPs were also correlated with Fermi gamma-ray photons to see if increased pair production in the magnetosphere is the mechanism responsible for GP emission. A total of 92022 GPs and 393 gamma-ray photons were used in this correlation analysis. No significant correlations were found between GPs and gamma-ray photons. This indicates that increased pair production in the magnetosphere is likely not the dominant cause of GPs. Possible methods of GP production may be increased coherence of synchrotron emission or changes in beaming direction.
  • Many physically motivated extensions to general relativity (GR) predict significant deviations in the properties of spacetime surrounding massive neutron stars. We report the measurement of a 2.01 +/- 0.04 solar mass pulsar in a 2.46-hr orbit with a 0.172 +/- 0.003 solar mass white dwarf. The high pulsar mass and the compact orbit make this system a sensitive laboratory of a previously untested strong-field gravity regime. Thus far, the observed orbital decay agrees with GR, supporting its validity even for the extreme conditions present in the system. The resulting constraints on deviations support the use of GR-based templates for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Additionally, the system strengthens recent constraints on the properties of dense matter and provides insight to binary stellar astrophysics and pulsar recycling.
  • The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is the largest fully steerable radio telescope in the world and is one of our greatest tools for discovering and studying radio pulsars. Over the last decade, the GBT has successfully found over 100 new pulsars through large-area surveys. Here I discuss the two most recent---the GBT 350 MHz Drift-scan survey and the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. The primary science goal of both surveys is to find interesting individual pulsars, including young pulsars, rotating radio transients, exotic binary systems, and especially bright millisecond pulsars (MSPs) suitable for inclusion in Pulsar Timing Arrays, which are trying to directly detect gravitational waves. These two surveys have combined to discover 85 pulsars to date, among which are 14 MSPs and many unique and fascinating systems. I present highlights from these surveys and discuss future plans. I also discuss recent results from targeted GBT pulsar searches of globular clusters and Fermi sources.
  • Ever since the first pulsar was discovered by Bell and Hewish over 40 years ago, we've known that not only are pulsars fascinating and truly exotic objects, but that we can use them as powerful tools for basic physics and astrophysics as well. Taylor and Hulse hammered these views home with their discovery and timing of the spectacular "binary pulsar" in the 1970s and 1980s. In the last two decades a host of surprises and a promise of phenomenal scientific riches in the future has come from the millisecond pulsars. As our instrumentation has become more sensitive and better suited to measuring the pulses from these objects, they've given us new tests of general relativity, fantastic probes of the interstellar medium, constraints on the physics of ultra-dense matter, new windows into binary and stellar evolution, and the promise of a direct detection of gravitational waves. These things really are cool, and there is much more we will do with them in the future.
  • Over the summer of 2007, we obtained 1191 hours of `drift-scan' pulsar search observations with the Green Bank Telescope at a radio frequency of 350 MHz. Here we describe the survey setup, search procedure, and the discovery and follow-up timing of thirteen pulsars. Among the new discoveries, one (PSR J1623-0841) was discovered only through its single pulses, two (PSRs J1327-0755 and J1737-0814) are millisecond pulsars, and another (PSR J2222-0137) is a mildly recycled pulsar. PSR J1327-0755 is a 2.7 ms pulsar at a DM of 27.9 pc cm^{-3} in a 8.7 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 0.22 solar mass. PSR J1737-0814 is a 4.2 ms pulsar at a DM of 55.3 pc cm^{-3} in a 79.3 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 0.06 solar mass. PSR J2222-0137 is a 32.8 ms pulsar at a very low DM of 3.27 pc cm^{-3} in a 2.4 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 1.11 solar mass. It is most likely a white dwarf-neutron star system or an unusual low-eccentricity double neutron star system. Ten other pulsars discovered in this survey are reported in the companion paper Lynch et al. 2012.
  • We have completed a 350 MHz drift scan survey using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the goal of finding new radio pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars that can be timed to high precision. This survey covered ~10300 square degrees and all of the data have now been fully processed. We have discovered a total of 31 new pulsars, seven of which are recycled pulsars. A companion paper by Boyles et al. (2012) describes the survey strategy, sky coverage, and instrumental set-up, and presents timing solutions for the first 13 pulsars. Here we describe the data analysis pipeline, survey sensitivity, and follow-up observations of new pulsars, and present timing solutions for 10 other pulsars. We highlight several sources---two interesting nulling pulsars, an isolated millisecond pulsar with a measurement of proper motion, and a partially recycled pulsar, PSR J0348+0432, which has a white dwarf companion in a relativistic orbit. PSR J0348+0432 will enable unprecedented tests of theories of gravity.
  • A compact steep spectrum radio source (J0535-0452) is located in the sky coincident with a bright optical rim in the HII region NGC1977. J0535-0452 is observed to be $\leq 100$ mas in angular size at 8.44 GHz. The spectrum for the radio source is steep and straight with a spectral index of -1.3 between 330 and 8440 MHz. No 2 \mu m IR counter part for the source is detected. These characteristics indicate that the source may be either a rare high redshift radio galaxy or a millisecond pulsar (MSP). Here we investigate whether the steep spectrum source is a millisecond pulsar.The optical rim is believed to be the interface between the HII region and the adjacent molecular cloud. If the compact source is a millisecond pulsar, it would have eluded detection in previous pulsar surveys because of the extreme scattering due to the HII region--molecular cloud interface. The limits obtained on the angular broadening along with the distance to the scattering screen are used to estimate the pulse broadening. The pulse broadening is shown to be less than a few msec at frequencies $\gtsim$ 5 GHz. We therefore searched for pulsed emission from J0535-0452 at 14.8 and 4.8 GHz with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). No pulsed emission is detected to 55 and 30 \mu Jy level at 4.8 and 14.8 GHz. Based on the parameter space explored by our pulsar search algorithm, we conclude that, if J0535-0452 is a pulsar, then it could only be a binary MSP of orbital period $\ltsim$ 5 hrs.
  • We have used optical images acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope to construct the first high-resolution extinction map in the direction of Terzan 5, a peculiar stellar system in the inner bulge of our Galaxy. The map has a spatial resolution of 8" X 8", over a total FoV of 200" X 200". The absorption clouds show a patchy structure on a typical scale of 20" and extinction variations as large as delta E(B-V) = 0.67 mag, especially in the direction of the center of the system. These correspond to an absolute color excess ranging from E(B-V)=2.15 mag, up to 2.82 mag. After the correction for differential reddening, two distinct red giant branches become clearly visible in the color magnitude diagram of Terzan 5 and they well correspond to the two sub-populations with different iron abundances recently discovered in this system.
  • We explore the enigmatic population of long-period, apparently non-recycled pulsars in globular clusters, building on recent work by Boyles et al (2011). This population is difficult to explain if it formed through typical core collapse supernovae, leading many authors to invoke electron capture supernovae. Where Boyles et al. dealt only with non-recycled pulsars in clusters, we focus on the pulsars that originated in clusters but then escaped into the field of the Galaxy due to the kicks they receive at birth. The magnitude of the kick induced by electron capture supernovae is not well known, so we explore various models for the kick velocity distribution and size of the population. The most realistic models are those where the kick velocity is <~ 10 km/s and where the number of pulsars scales with the luminosity of the cluster (as a proxy for cluster mass). This is in good agreement with other estimates of the electron capture supernovae kick velocity. We simulate a number of large-area pulsar surveys to determine if a population of pulsars originating in clusters could be identified as being separate from normal disk pulsars. We find that the spatial and kinematical properties of the population could be used, but only if large numbers of pulsars are detected. In fact, even the most optimistic surveys carried out with the future Square Kilometer Array are likely to detect < 10% of the total population, so the prospects for identifying these as a separate group of pulsars are presently poor.
  • We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to time nine previously known pulsars without published timing solutions in the globular clusters M62, NGC 6544, and NGC 6624. We have full timing solutions that measure the spin, astrometric, and (where applicable) binary parameters for six of these pulsars. The remaining three pulsars (reported here for the first time) were not detected enough to establish solutions. We also report our timing solutions for five pulsars with previously published solutions, and find good agreement with past authors, except for PSR J1701-3006B in M62. Gas in this system is probably responsible for the discrepancy in orbital parameters, and we have been able to measure a change in the orbital period over the course of our observations. Among the pulsars with new solutions we find several binary pulsars with very low mass companions (members of the so-called "black widow" class) and we are able to place constraints on the mass-to-light ratio in two clusters. We confirm that one of the pulsars in NGC 6624 is indeed a member of the rare class of non-recycled pulsars found in globular clusters. We also have measured the orbital precession and Shapiro delay for a relativistic binary in NGC 6544. If we assume that the orbital precession can be described entirely by general relativity, which is likely, we are able to measure the total system mass (2.57190(73) M_sun) and companion mass (1.2064(20) M_sun), from which we derive the orbital inclination [sin(i) = 0.9956(14)] and the pulsar mass (1.3655(21) M_sun), the most precise such measurement ever obtained for a millisecond pulsar. The companion is the most massive known around a fully recycled pulsar.