• Modern radio interferometers enable observations of spectral lines with unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity. In spite of these technical advances, many lines of interest are still at best weakly detected and therefore necessitate detection and analysis techniques specialized for the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime. Matched filters can leverage knowledge of the source structure and kinematics to increase sensitivity of spectral line observations. Application of the filter in the native Fourier domain improves SNR while simultaneously avoiding the computational cost and ambiguities associated with imaging, making matched filtering a fast and robust method for weak spectral line detection. We demonstrate how an approximate matched filter can be constructed from a previously observed line or from a model of the source, and we show how this filter can be used to robustly infer a detection significance for weak spectral lines. When applied to ALMA Cycle 2 observations of CH3OH in the protoplanetary disk around TW Hya, the technique yields a ~53% SNR boost over aperture-based spectral extraction methods, and we show that an even higher boost will be achieved for observations at higher spatial resolution. A Python-based open-source implementation of this technique is available under the MIT license at https://github.com/AstroChem/VISIBLE.
  • The discovery of thousands of exoplanets over the last couple of decades has shown that the birth of planets is a very efficient process in nature. Theories invoke a multitude of mechanisms to describe the assembly of planets in the disks around pre-main-sequence stars, but observational constraints have been sparse on account of insufficient sensitivity and resolution. Understanding how planets form and interact with their parental disk is crucial also to illuminate the main characteristics of a large portion of the full population of planets that is inaccessible to current and near-future observations. This White Paper describes some of the main issues for our current understanding of the formation and evolution of planets, and the critical contribution expected in this field by the Next Generation Very Large Array.
  • Turbulence is a fundamental parameter in models of grain growth during the early stages of planet formation. As such, observational constraints on its magnitude are crucial. Here we self-consistently analyze ALMA CO(2-1), SMA CO(3-2), and SMA CO(6-5) observations of the disk around TW Hya and find an upper limit on the turbulent broadening of $<$0.08c$_s$ ($\alpha<$0.007 for $\alpha$ defined only within 2-3 pressure scale heights above the midplane), lower than the tentative detection previously found from an analysis of the CO(2-1) data. We examine in detail the challenges of image plane fitting vs directly fitting the visibilities, while also considering the role of the vertical temperature gradient, systematic uncertainty in the amplitude calibration, and assumptions about the CO abundance, as potential sources of the discrepancy in the turbulence measurements. These tests result in variations of the turbulence limit between $<$0.04c$_s$ and $<$0.13c$_s$, consistently lower than the 0.2-0.4c$_s$ found previously. Having ruled out numerous factors, we restrict the source of the discrepancy to our assumed coupling between temperature and density through hydrostatic equilibrium in the presence of a vertical temperature gradient and/or the confinement of CO to a thin molecular layer above the midplane, although further work is needed to quantify the influence of these prescriptions. Assumptions about hydrostatic equilibrium and the CO distribution are physically motivated, and may have a small influence on measuring the kinematics of the gas, but they become important when constraining small effects such as the strength of the turbulence within a protoplanetary disk.
  • We present 1.3 millimeter observations of the debris disk surrounding the HR 8799 multi-planet system from the Submillimeter Array to complement archival ALMA observations that spatially filtered away the bulk of the emission. The image morphology at $3.8$ arcsecond (150 AU) resolution indicates an optically thin circumstellar belt, which we associate with a population of dust-producing planetesimals within the debris disk. The interferometric visibilities are fit well by an axisymmetric radial power-law model characterized by a broad width, $\Delta R/R\gtrsim 1$. The belt inclination and orientation parameters are consistent with the planet orbital parameters within the mutual uncertainties. The models constrain the radial location of the inner edge of the belt to $R_\text{in}= 104_{-12}^{+8}$ AU. In a simple scenario where the chaotic zone of the outermost planet b truncates the planetesimal distribution, this inner edge location translates into a constraint on the planet~b mass of $M_\text{pl} = 5.8_{-3.1}^{+7.9}$ M$_{\rm Jup}$. This mass estimate is consistent with infrared observations of the planet luminosity and standard hot-start evolutionary models, with the uncertainties allowing for a range of initial conditions. We also present new 9 millimeter observations of the debris disk from the Very Large Array and determine a millimeter spectral index of $2.41\pm0.17$. This value is typical of debris disks and indicates a power-law index of the grain size distribution $q=3.27\pm0.10$, close to predictions for a classical collisional cascade.
  • We analyze high angular resolution ALMA observations of the TW Hya disk to place constraints on the CO and dust properties. We present new, sensitive observations of the $^{12}$CO $J = 3-2$ line at a spatial resolution of 8 AU (0\farcs14). The CO emission exhibits a bright inner core, a shoulder at $r\approx70$ AU, and a prominent break in slope at $r\approx90$ AU. Radiative transfer modeling is used to demonstrate that the emission morphology can be reasonably reproduced with a $^{12}$CO column density profile featuring a steep decrease at $r\approx15$ AU and a secondary bump peaking at $r\approx70$ AU. Similar features have been identified in observations of rarer CO isotopologues, which trace heights closer to the midplane. Substructure in the underlying gas distribution or radially varying CO depletion that affects much of the disk's vertical extent may explain the shared emission features of the main CO isotopologues. We also combine archival 1.3 mm and 870 $\mu$m continuum observations to produce a spectral index map at a spatial resolution of 2 AU. The spectral index rises sharply at the continuum emission gaps at radii of 25, 41, and 47 AU. This behavior suggests that the grains within the gaps are no larger than a few millimeters. Outside the continuum gaps, the low spectral index values of $\alpha\approx 2$ indicate either that grains up to centimeter size are present, or that the bright continuum rings are marginally optically thick at millimeter wavelengths.
  • We present spatially and spectrally resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of gas and dust orbiting the pre-main sequence hierarchical triple star system GW Ori. A forward-modeling of the ${}^{13}$CO and C${}^{18}$O $J$=2-1 transitions permits a measurement of the total stellar mass in this system, $5.29 \pm 0.09\,M_\odot$, and the circum-triple disk inclination, $137.6 \pm 2.0^\circ$. Optical spectra spanning a 35 year period were used to derive new radial velocities and, coupled with a spectroscopic disentangling technique, revealed that the A and B components of GW Ori form a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a $241.50\pm0.05$ day period; a tertiary companion orbits that inner pair with a $4218\pm50$ day period. Combining the results from the ALMA data and the optical spectra with three epochs of astrometry in the literature, we constrain the individual stellar masses in the system ($M_\mathrm{A} \approx 2.7\,M_\odot$, $M_\mathrm{B} \approx 1.7\,M_\odot$, $M_\mathrm{C} \approx 0.9\,M_\odot$) and find strong evidence that at least one (and likely both) stellar orbital planes are misaligned with the disk plane by as much as $45^\circ$. A $V$-band light curve spanning 30 years reveals several new $\sim$30 day eclipse events 0.1-0.7~mag in depth and a 0.2 mag sinusoidal oscillation that is clearly phased with the AB-C orbital period. Taken together, these features suggest that the A-B pair may be partially obscured by material in the inner disk as the pair approaches apoastron in the hierarchical orbit. Lastly, we conclude that stellar evolutionary models are consistent with our measurements of the masses and basic photospheric properties if the GW Ori system is $\sim$1 Myr old.
  • Discs around young planets, so-called circumplanetary discs (CPDs), are essential for planet growth, satellite formation, and planet detection. We study the millimetre and centimetre emission from accreting CPDs by using the simple $\alpha$ disc model. We find that it is easier to detect CPDs at shorter radio wavelengths (e.g. $\lambda\lesssim$ 1 mm). For example, if the system is 140 pc away from us, deep observations (e.g. 5 hours) at ALMA Band 7 (0.87 mm) are sensitive to as small as 0.03 lunar mass of dust in CPDs. If the CPD is around a Jupiter mass planet 20 AU away from the host star and has $\alpha\lesssim 0.001$, ALMA can detect this disc when it accretes faster than $10^{-10} M_{\odot}/yr$. ALMA can also detect the "minimum mass sub-nebulae" disc if such a disc exists around a young planet in YSOs. However, to distinguish the embedded compact CPD from the circumstellar disc material, we should observe circumstellar discs with large gaps/cavities using the highest resolution possible. We also calculate the CPD fluxes at VLA bands, and discuss the possibility of detecting radio emission from jets/winds launched in CPDs. Finally we argue that, if the radial drift of dust particles is considered, the drifting timescale for millimetre dust in CPDs can be extremely short. It only takes 10$^2$-10$^{3}$ years for CPDs to lose millimetre dust. Thus, for CPDs to be detectable at radio wavelengths, mm-sized dust in CPDs needs to be replenished continuously, or the disc has a significant fraction of micron-sized dust or a high gas surface density so that the particle drifting timescale is long, or the radial drift is prevented by other means (e.g. pressure traps).
  • We present a sub-arcsecond resolution survey of the 340 GHz dust continuum emission from 50 nearby protoplanetary disks, based on new and archival observations with the Submillimeter Array. The observed visibility data were modeled with a simple prescription for the radial surface brightness profile. The results were used to extract intuitive, empirical estimates of the emission "size" for each disk, $R_{\rm eff}$, defined as the radius that encircles a fixed fraction of the total continuum luminosity, $L_{\rm mm}$. We find a significant correlation between the sizes and luminosities, such that $R_{\rm eff} \propto L_{\rm mm}^{0.5}$, providing a confirmation and quantitative characterization of a putative trend that was noted previously. This correlation suggests that these disks have roughly the same average surface brightness interior to their given effective radius, ~0.2 Jy arcsec$^{-2}$ (or 8 K in brightness temperature). The same trend remains, but the 0.2dex of dispersion perpendicular to this relation essentially disappears, when we account for the irradiation environment of each disk with a crude approximation of the dust temperatures based on the stellar host luminosities. We consider two (not mutually exclusive) explanations for the origin of this size-luminosity relationship. Simple models of the growth and migration of disk solids can account for the observed trend for a reasonable range of initial conditions, but only on timescales that are much shorter than the nominal ages present in the sample. An alternative scenario invokes optically thick emission concentrated on unresolved scales, with filling factors of a few tens of percent, that are perhaps manifestations of localized particle traps.
  • Gas kinematics are an important part of the planet formation process. Turbulence influences planetesimal growth and migration from the scale of sub-micron dust grains through gas-giant planets. Radio observations of resolved molecular line emission can directly measure this non-thermal motion and, taking advantage of the layered chemical structure of disks, different molecular lines can be combined to map the turbulence throughout the vertical extent of a protoplanetary disk. Here we present ALMA observations of three molecules (DCO$^+$(3-2), C$^{18}$O(2-1) and CO(2-1)) from the disk around HD 163296. We are able to place stringent upper limits ($v_{\rm turb}<$0.06c$_s$, $<$0.05c$_s$ and $<$0.04c$_s$ for CO(2-1), C$^{18}$O(2-1) and DCO$^+$(3-2) respectively), corresponding to $\alpha\lesssim$3$\times$10$^{-3}$, similar to our prior limit derived from CO(3-2). This indicates that there is little turbulence throughout the vertical extent of the disk, contrary to theoretical predictions based on the magneto-rotational instability and gravito-turbulence. In modeling the DCO$^+$ emission we also find that it is confined to three concentric rings at 65.7$\pm$0.9 au, 149.9$^{+0.5}_{-0.7}$ au and 259$\pm$1 au, indicative of a complex chemical environment.
  • We report the first detection of a substantial brightening event in an isotopologue of a key molecular ion, HCO$^+$, within a protoplanetary disk of a T Tauri star. The H$^{13}$CO$^+$ $J=3-2$ rotational transition was observed three times toward IM Lup between July 2014 and May 2015 with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. The first two observations show similar spectrally integrated line and continuum fluxes, while the third observation shows a doubling in the disk integrated $J=3-2$ line flux compared to the continuum, which does not change between the three epochs. We explore models of an X-ray active star irradiating the disk via stellar flares, and find that the optically thin H$^{13}$CO$^+$ emission variation can potentially be explained via X-ray driven chemistry temporarily enhancing the HCO$^+$ abundance in the upper layers of the disk atmosphere during large or prolonged flaring events. If the HCO$^+$ enhancement is indeed caused by a X-ray flare, future observations should be able to spatially resolve these events and potentially enable us to watch the chemical aftermath of the high-energy stellar radiation propagating across the face of protoplanetary disks, providing a new pathway to explore ionization physics and chemistry, including electron density, in disks.
  • H2CO is one of the most readily detected organic molecules in protoplanetary disks. Yet its distribution and dominant formation pathway(s) remain largely unconstrained. To address these issues, we present ALMA observations of two H2CO lines (3_{12}-2_{11} and 5_{15}-4_{14}) at 0".5 (~30 au) spatial resolution toward the disk around the nearby T Tauri star TW Hya. Emission from both lines is spatially resolved, showing a central depression, a peak at 0".4 radius, and a radial decline at larger radii with a bump at ~1", near the millimeter continuum edge. We adopt a physical model for the disk and use toy models to explore the radial and vertical H2CO abundance structure. We find that the observed emission implies the presence of at least two distinct H2CO gas reservoirs: (1) a warm and unresolved inner component (<10 au), and (2) an outer component that extends from ~15 au to beyond the millimeter continuum edge. The outer component is further constrained by the line ratio to arise in a more elevated disk layer at larger radii. The inferred H2CO abundance structure agrees well with disk chemistry models, which predict efficient H2CO gas-phase formation close to the star, and cold H2CO grain surface formation, through H additions to condensed CO, followed by non-thermal desorption in the outer disk. The implied presence of active grain surface chemistry in the TW Hya disk is consistent with the recent detection of CH3OH emission, and suggests that more complex organic molecules are formed in disks, as well.
  • AA Tau is the archetype for a class of stars with a peculiar periodic photometric variability thought to be related to a warped inner disk structure with a nearly edge-on viewing geometry. We present high resolution ($\sim$0.2") ALMA observations of the 0.87 and 1.3~mm dust continuum emission from the disk around AA Tau. These data reveal an evenly spaced three-ringed emission structure, with distinct peaks at 0.34", 0.66", and 0.99", all viewed at a modest inclination of 59.1$^{\circ}\pm$0.3$^{\circ}$ (decidedly not edge-on). In addition to this ringed substructure, we find non-axisymmetric features including a `bridge' of emission that connects opposite sides of the innermost ring. We speculate on the nature of this `bridge' in light of accompanying observations of HCO$^+$ and $^{13}$CO (J=3--2) line emission. The HCO$^+$ emission is bright interior to the innermost dust ring, with a projected velocity field that appears rotated with respect to the resolved disk geometry, indicating the presence of a warp or inward radial flow. We suggest that the continuum bridge and HCO$^+$ line kinematics could originate from gap-crossing accretion streams, which may be responsible for the long-duration dimming of optical light from AA Tau.
  • Measurements of radial velocity variations from the spectroscopic monitoring of stars and their companions are essential for a broad swath of astrophysics, providing access to the fundamental physical properties that dictate all phases of stellar evolution and facilitating the quantitative study of planetary systems. The conversion of those measurements into both constraints on the orbital architecture and individual component spectra can be a serious challenge, however, especially for extreme flux ratio systems and observations with relatively low sensitivity. Gaussian processes define sampling distributions of flexible, continuous functions that are well-motivated for modeling stellar spectra, enabling proficient search for companion lines in time-series spectra. We introduce a new technique for spectral disentangling, where the posterior distributions of the orbital parameters and intrinsic, rest-frame stellar spectra are explored simultaneously without needing to invoke cross-correlation templates. To demonstrate its potential, this technique is deployed on red-optical time-series spectra of the mid-M dwarf binary LP661-13. We report orbital parameters with improved precision compared to traditional radial velocity analysis and successfully reconstruct the primary and secondary spectra. We discuss potential applications for other stellar and exoplanet radial velocity techniques and extensions to time-variable spectra. The code used in this analysis is freely available as an open source Python package.
  • The deuterium enrichment of molecules is sensitive to their formation environment. Constraining patterns of deuterium chemistry in protoplanetary disks is therefore useful for probing how material is inherited or reprocessed throughout the stages of star and planet formation. We present ALMA observations at $\sim0.6"$ resolution of DCO$^+$, H$^{13}$CO$^+$, DCN, and H$^{13}$CN in the full disks around T Tauri stars AS 209 and IM Lup, the transition disks around T Tauri stars V4046 Sgr and LkCa 15, and the full disks around Herbig Ae stars MWC 480 and HD 163296. We also present ALMA observations of HCN in the IM Lup disk. DCN, DCO$^+$, and H$^{13}$CO$^+$ are detected in all disks, and H$^{13}$CN in all but the IM Lup disk. We find efficient deuterium fractionation for the sample, with estimates of disk-averaged DCO$^+$/HCO$^+$ and DCN/HCN abundance ratios ranging from $\sim0.02-0.06$ and $\sim0.005-0.08$, respectively, which is comparable to values reported for other ISM environments. The relative distributions of DCN and DCO$^+$ vary between disks, suggesting that multiple formation pathways may be needed to explain the diverse emission morphologies. In addition, gaps and rings observed in both H$^{13}$CO$^+$ and DCO$^+$ emission provide new evidence that DCO$^+$ bears a complex relationship with the location of the midplane CO snowline.
  • We present ALMA observations of the GQ Lup system, a young Sun-like star with a substellar mass companion in a wide-separation orbit. These observations of 870 $\mu$m continuum and CO J=3-2 line emission with beam size $\sim0.3''$ ($\sim45$ AU) resolve the disk of dust and gas surrounding the primary star, GQ Lup A, and provide deep limits on any circumplanetary disk surrounding the companion, GQ Lup b. The circumprimary dust disk is compact with a FWHM of $59\pm12$ AU, while the gas has a larger extent with a characteristic radius of $46.5\pm1.8$ AU. By forward-modeling the velocity field of the circumprimary disk based on the CO emission, we constrain the mass of GQ Lup A to be $M_* = (1.03\pm0.05)*(d/156\text{ pc})$ $M_\odot$, where $d$ is a known distance, and determine that we view the disk at an inclination angle of $60.5^\circ\pm0.5^\circ$ and a position angle of $346^\circ \pm1^\circ$. The $3\sigma$ upper limit on the 870 $\mu$m flux density of any circumplanetary disk associated with GQ Lup b of $<0.15$ mJy implies an upper limit on the dust disk mass of $<0.04$ $M_\oplus$ for standard assumptions about optically thin emission. We discuss proposed mechanisms for the formation of wide-separation substellar companions given the non-detection of circumplanetary disks around GQ Lup b and other similar systems.
  • Gravitational forces are expected to excite spiral density waves in protoplanetary disks, disks of gas and dust orbiting young stars. However, previous observations that showed spiral structure were not able to probe disk midplanes, where most of the mass is concentrated and where planet formation takes place. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array we detected a pair of trailing symmetric spiral arms in the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young star Elias 2-27. The arms extend to the disk outer regions and can be traced down to the midplane. These millimeter-wave observations also reveal an emission gap closer to the star than the spiral arms. We argue that the observed spirals trace shocks of spiral density waves in the midplane of this young disk.
  • The spatial distribution of gas and solids in protoplanetary disks determines the composition and formation efficiency of planetary systems. A number of disks show starkly different distributions for the gas and small grains compared to millimeter-centimeter sized dust. We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the dust continuum, CO, $^{13}$CO, and C$^{18}$O in the IM Lup protoplanetary disk, one of the first systems where this dust-gas dichotomy was clearly seen. The $^{12}$CO is detected out to a radius of 970 AU, while the millimeter continuum emission is truncated at just 313 AU. Based upon this data, we have built a comprehensive physical and chemical model for the disk structure, which takes into account the complex, coupled nature of the gas and dust and the interplay between the local and external environment. We constrain the distributions of gas and dust, the gas temperatures, the CO abundances, the CO optical depths, and the incident external radiation field. We find that the reduction/removal of dust from the outer disk exposes this region to higher stellar and external radiation and decreases the rate of freeze-out, allowing CO to remain in the gas out to large radial distances. We estimate a gas-phase CO abundance of $5\%$ of the ISM value and a low external radiation field ($G_0\lesssim4$). The latter is consistent with that expected from the local stellar population. We additionally find tentative evidence for ring-like continuum substructure, suggestions of isotope-selective photodissociation, and a diffuse gas halo.
  • Millimeter observations of CO isotopologues are often used to make inferences about protoplanetary disk gas density and temperature structures. The accuracy of these estimates depends on our understanding of CO freezeout and desorption from dust grains. Most models of these processes indicate that CO column density decreases monotonically with distance from the central star due to a decrease in gas density and freezeout beyond the CO snowline. We present ALMA Cycle 2 observations of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO, and C$^{18}$O $J=2-1$ emission that instead suggest CO enhancement in the outer disk of T Tauri star AS 209. Most notably, the C$^{18}$O emission consists of a central peak and a ring at a radius of $\sim1''$ (120 AU), well outside the expected CO snowline. We propose that the ring arises from the onset of CO desorption near the edge of the millimeter dust disk. CO desorption exterior to a CO snowline may occur via non-thermal processes involving cosmic rays or high-energy photons, or via a radial thermal inversion arising from dust migration.
  • We present long-baseline Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the 870 micron continuum emission from the nearest gas-rich protoplanetary disk, around TW Hya, that trace millimeter-sized particles down to spatial scales as small as 1 AU (20 mas). These data reveal a series of concentric ring-shaped substructures in the form of bright zones and narrow dark annuli (1-6 AU) with modest contrasts (5-30%). We associate these features with concentrations of solids that have had their inward radial drift slowed or stopped, presumably at local gas pressure maxima. No significant non-axisymmetric structures are detected. Some of the observed features occur near temperatures that may be associated with the condensation fronts of major volatile species, but the relatively small brightness contrasts may also be a consequence of magnetized disk evolution (the so-called zonal flows). Other features, particularly a narrow dark annulus located only 1 AU from the star, could indicate interactions between the disk and young planets. These data signal that ordered substructures on ~AU scales can be common, fundamental factors in disk evolution, and that high resolution microwave imaging can help characterize them during the epoch of planet formation.
  • Observations of debris disks offer a window into the physical and dynamical properties of planetesimals in extrasolar systems through the size distribution of dust grains. In particular, the millimeter spectral index of thermal dust emission encodes information on the grain size distribution. We have made new VLA observations of a sample of seven nearby debris disks at 9 mm, with 3" resolution and $\sim5$ $\mu$Jy/beam rms. We combine these with archival ATCA observations of eight additional debris disks observed at 7 mm, together with up-to-date observations of all disks at (sub)millimeter wavelengths from the literature to place tight constraints on the millimeter spectral indices and thus grain size distributions. The analysis gives a weighted mean for the slope of the power law grain size distribution, $n(a)\propto a^{-q}$, of $\langle q \rangle = 3.36\pm0.02$, with a possible trend of decreasing $q$ for later spectral type stars. We compare our results to a range of theoretical models of collisional cascades, from the standard self-similar, steady-state size distribution ($q=3.5$) to solutions that incorporate more realistic physics such as alternative velocity distributions and material strengths, the possibility of a cutoff at small dust sizes from radiation pressure, as well as results from detailed dynamical calculations of specific disks. Such effects can lead to size distributions consistent with the data, and plausibly the observed scatter in spectral indices. For the AU Mic system, the VLA observations show clear evidence of a highly variable stellar emission component; this stellar activity obviates the need to invoke the presence of an asteroid belt to explain the previously reported compact millimeter source in this system.
  • The disk around HD 141569 is one of a handful of systems whose weak infrared emission is consistent with a debris disk, but still has a significant reservoir of gas. Here we report spatially resolved mm observations of the CO(3-2) and CO(1-0) emission as seen with the SMA and CARMA. We find that the excitation temperature for CO is lower than expected from cospatial blackbody grains, similar to previous observations of analogous systems, and derive a gas mass that lies between that of gas-rich primordial disks and gas-poor debris disks. The data also indicate a large inner hole in the CO gas distribution and an outer radius that lies interior to the outer scattered light rings. This spatial distribution, with the dust rings just outside the gaseous disk, is consistent with the expected interactions between gas and dust in an optically thin disk. This indicates that gas can have a significant effect on the location of the dust within debris disks.
  • The presence of debris disks around young main sequence stars hints at the existence and structure of planetary systems. Millimeter-wavelength observations probe large grains that trace the location of planetesimal belts. The FEPS (Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems) $Spitzer$ Legacy survey of nearby young solar analogues yielded a sample of five debris disk-hosting stars with millimeter flux suitable for interferometric follow-up. We present observations with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at ~2" resolution that spatially resolve the debris disks around these nearby ($d\sim$50 pc) stars. Two of the five disks (HD 377, HD 8907) are spatially resolved for the first time and one (HD 104860) is resolved at millimeter wavelengths for the first time. We combine our new observations with archival SMA and Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) data to enable a uniform analysis of the full five-object sample. We simultaneously model the broad-band photometric data and resolved millimeter visibilities to constrain the dust temperatures and disk morphologies, and perform an MCMC analysis to fit for basic structural parameters. We find that the radii and widths of the cold outer belts exhibit properties consistent with scaled-up versions of the Solar System's Kuiper Belt. All the disks exhibit characteristic grain sizes comparable to the blowout size, and all the resolved observations of emission from large dust grains are consistent with an axisymmetric dust distribution to within the uncertainties. These results are consistent with comparable studies carried out at infrared wavelengths.
  • Recent imaging of protoplanetary disks with high resolution and contrast have revealed a striking variety of substructure. Of particular interest are cases where near-infrared scattered light images show evidence for low-intensity annular "gaps." The origins of such structures are still uncertain, but the interaction of the gas disk with planets is a common interpretation. We study the impact that the evolution of the solid material can have on the observable properties of disks in a simple scenario without any gravitational or hydrodynamical disturbances to the gas disk structure. Even with a smooth and continuous gas density profile, we find that the scattered light emission produced by small dust grains can exhibit ring-like depressions similar to those presented in recent observations. The physical mechanisms responsible for these features rely on the inefficient fragmentation of dust particles. The occurrence and position of the proposed "gap" features depend most strongly on the dust-to-gas ratio, the fragmentation threshold velocity, the strength of the turbulence, and the age of the disk, and should be generic (at some radius) for typically adopted disk parameters. The same physical processes can affect the thermal emission at optically thin wavelengths ($\sim$1 mm), although the behavior can be more complex; unlike for disk-planet interactions, a "gap" should not be present at these longer wavelengths.
  • Turbulence can transport angular momentum in protoplanetary disks and influence the growth and evolution of planets. With spatially and spectrally resolved molecular emission line measurements provided by (sub)millimeter interferometric observations, it is possible to directly measure non-thermal motions in the disk gas that can be attributed to this turbulence. We report a new constraint on the turbulence in the disk around HD 163296, a nearby young A star, determined from ALMA Science Verification observations of four CO emission lines (the CO(3-2), CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1), and C18O(2-1) transitions). The different optical depths for these lines permit probes of non-thermal line-widths at a range of physical conditions (temperature and density) and depths into the disk interior. We derive stringent limits on the non-thermal motions in the upper layers of the outer disk such that any contribution to the line-widths from turbulence is <3% of the local sound speed. These limits are approximately an order of magnitude lower than theoretical predictions for full-blown MHD turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability, potentially suggesting that this mechanism is less efficient in the outer (R>30AU) disk than has been previously considered.
  • The condensation fronts (snow lines) of H2O, CO and other abundant volatiles in the midplane of a protoplanetary disk affect several aspects of planet formation. Locating the CO snow line, where the CO gas column density is expected to drop substantially, based solely on CO emission profiles is challenging. This has prompted an exploration of chemical signatures of CO freeze-out. We present ALMA Cycle 1 observations of the N2H+ J=3-2 and DCO+ J=4-3 emission lines toward the disk around the Herbig Ae star HD~163296 at ~0.5" (60 AU) resolution, and evaluate their utility as tracers of the CO snow line location. The N2H+ emission is distributed in a ring with an inner radius at 90 AU, corresponding to a midplane temperature of 25 K. This result is consistent with a new analysis of optically thin C18O data, which implies a sharp drop in CO abundance at 90 AU. Thus N2H+ appears to be a robust tracer of the midplane CO snow line. The DCO+ emission also has a ring morphology, but neither the inner nor the outer radius coincides with the CO snow line location of 90 AU, indicative of a complex relationship between DCO+ emission and CO freeze-out in the disk midplane. Compared to TW Hya, CO freezes out at a higher temperature in the disk around HD 163296 (25 vs. 17 K in the TW Hya disk), perhaps due to different ice compositions. This highlights the importance of actually measuring the CO snow line location, rather than assuming a constant CO freeze-out temperature for all disks.