• As several large single-dish radio surveys begin operation within the coming decade, a wealth of radio data will become available and provide a new window to the Universe. In order to fully exploit the potential of these data sets, it is important to understand the systematic effects associated with the instrument and the analysis pipeline. A common approach to tackle this is to forward-model the entire system - from the hardware to the analysis of the data products. For this purpose, we introduce two newly developed, open-source Python packages: the HI Data Emulator (HIDE) and the Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer (SEEK) for simulating and processing single-dish radio survey data. HIDE forward-models the process of collecting astronomical radio signals in a single-dish radio telescope instrument and outputs pixel-level time-ordered-data. SEEK processes the time-ordered-data, removes artifacts from Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), automatically applies flux calibration, and aims to recover the astronomical radio signal. The two packages can be used separately or together depending on the application. Their modular and flexible nature allows easy adaptation to other instruments and data sets. We describe the basic architecture of the two packages and examine in detail the noise and RFI modeling in HIDE, as well as the implementation of gain calibration and RFI mitigation in SEEK. We then apply HIDE & SEEK to forward-model a Galactic survey in the frequency range 990 - 1260 MHz based on data taken at the Bleien Observatory. For this survey, we expect to cover 70% of the full sky and achieve a median signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 5 - 6 in the cleanest channels including systematic uncertainties. However, we also point out the potential challenges of high RFI contamination and baseline removal when examining the early data from the Bleien Observatory.
  • We describe the design and performance of the hardware system at the Bleien Observatory. The system is designed to deliver a map of the Galaxy for studying the foreground contamination of low-redshift (z=0.13--0.43) H$_{\rm I}$ intensity mapping experiments as well as other astronomical Galactic studies. This hardware system is composed of a 7m parabolic dish, a dual-polarization corrugated horn feed, a pseudo correlation receiver, a Fast Fourier Transform spectrometer, and an integrated control system that controls and monitors the progress of the data collection. The main innovative designs in the hardware are (1) the pseudo correlation receiver and the cold reference source within (2) the high dynamic range, high frequency resolution spectrometer and (3) the phase-switch implementation of the system. This is the first time these technologies are used together for a L-band radio telescope to achieve an electronically stable system, which is an essential first step for wide-field cosmological measurements. This work demonstrates the prospects and challenges for future H$_{\rm I}$ intensity mapping experiments.
  • Quantifying the concordance between different cosmological experiments is important for testing the validity of theoretical models and systematics in the observations. In earlier work, we thus proposed the Surprise, a concordance measure derived from the relative entropy between posterior distributions. We revisit the properties of the Surprise and describe how it provides a general, versatile, and robust measure for the agreement between datasets. We also compare it to other measures of concordance that have been proposed for cosmology. As an application, we extend our earlier analysis and use the Surprise to quantify the agreement between WMAP 9, Planck 13 and Planck 15 constraints on the $\Lambda$CDM model. Using a principle component analysis in parameter space, we find that the large Surprise between WMAP 9 and Planck 13 (S = 17.6 bits, implying a deviation from consistency at 99.8% confidence) is due to a shift along a direction that is dominated by the amplitude of the power spectrum. The Planck 15 constraints deviate from the Planck 13 results (S = 56.3 bits), primarily due to a shift in the same direction. The Surprise between WMAP and Planck consequently disappears when moving to Planck 15 (S = -5.1 bits). This means that, unlike Planck 13, Planck 15 is not in tension with WMAP 9. These results illustrate the advantages of the relative entropy and the Surprise for quantifying the disagreement between cosmological experiments and more generally as an information metric for cosmology.
  • Intensity mapping of neutral hydrogen (HI) is a promising observational probe of cosmology and large-scale structure. We present wide field simulations of HI intensity maps based on N-body simulations of a $2.6\, {\rm Gpc / h}$ box with $2048^3$ particles (particle mass $1.6 \times 10^{11}\, {\rm M_\odot / h}$). Using a conditional mass function to populate the simulated dark matter density field with halos below the mass resolution of the simulation ($10^{8}\, {\rm M_\odot / h} < M_{\rm halo} < 10^{13}\, {\rm M_\odot / h}$), we assign HI to those halos according to a phenomenological halo to HI mass relation. The simulations span a redshift range of 0.35 < z < 0.9 in redshift bins of width $\Delta z \approx 0.05$ and cover a quarter of the sky at an angular resolution of about 7'. We use the simulated intensity maps to study the impact of non-linear effects and redshift space distortions on the angular clustering of HI. Focusing on the autocorrelations of the maps, we apply and compare several estimators for the angular power spectrum and its covariance. We verify that these estimators agree with analytic predictions on large scales and study the validity of approximations based on Gaussian random fields, particularly in the context of the covariance. We discuss how our results and the simulated maps can be useful for planning and interpreting future HI intensity mapping surveys.
  • To shed light on the fundamental problems posed by Dark Energy and Dark Matter, a large number of experiments have been performed and combined to constrain cosmological models. We propose a novel way of quantifying the information gained by updates on the parameter constraints from a series of experiments which can either complement earlier measurements or replace them. For this purpose, we use the Kullback-Leibler divergence or relative entropy from information theory to measure differences in the posterior distributions in model parameter space from a pair of experiments. We apply this formalism to a historical series of Cosmic Microwave Background experiments ranging from Boomerang to WMAP, SPT, and Planck. Considering different combinations of these experiments, we thus estimate the information gain in units of bits and distinguish contributions from the reduction of statistical errors and the `surprise' corresponding to a significant shift of the parameters' central values. For this experiment series, we find individual relative entropy gains ranging from about 1 to 30 bits. In some cases, e.g. when comparing WMAP and Planck results, we find that the gains are dominated by the surprise rather than by improvements in statistical precision. We discuss how this technique provides a useful tool for both quantifying the constraining power of data from cosmological probes and detecting the tensions between experiments.
  • Bayesian inference is often used in cosmology and astrophysics to derive constraints on model parameters from observations. This approach relies on the ability to compute the likelihood of the data given a choice of model parameters. In many practical situations, the likelihood function may however be unavailable or intractable due to non-gaussian errors, non-linear measurements processes, or complex data formats such as catalogs and maps. In these cases, the simulation of mock data sets can often be made through forward modeling. We discuss how Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) can be used in these cases to derive an approximation to the posterior constraints using simulated data sets. This technique relies on the sampling of the parameter set, a distance metric to quantify the difference between the observation and the simulations and summary statistics to compress the information in the data. We first review the principles of ABC and discuss its implementation using a Population Monte-Carlo (PMC) algorithm and the Mahalanobis distance metric. We test the performance of the implementation using a Gaussian toy model. We then apply the ABC technique to the practical case of the calibration of image simulations for wide field cosmological surveys. We find that the ABC analysis is able to provide reliable parameter constraints for this problem and is therefore a promising technique for other applications in cosmology and astrophysics. Our implementation of the ABC PMC method is made available via a public code release.
  • We study the benefits and limits of parallelised Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling in cosmology. MCMC methods are widely used for the estimation of cosmological parameters from a given set of observations and are typically based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Some of the required calculations can however be computationally intensive, meaning that a single long chain can take several hours or days to calculate. In practice, this can be limiting, since the MCMC process needs to be performed many times to test the impact of possible systematics and to understand the robustness of the measurements being made. To achieve greater speed through parallelisation, MCMC algorithms need to have short auto-correlation times and minimal overheads caused by tuning and burn-in. The resulting scalability is hence influenced by two factors, the MCMC overheads and the parallelisation costs. In order to efficiently distribute the MCMC sampling over thousands of cores on modern cloud computing infrastructure, we developed a Python framework called CosmoHammer which embeds emcee, an implementation by Foreman-Mackey et al. (2012) of the affine invariant ensemble sampler by Goodman and Weare (2010). We test the performance of CosmoHammer for cosmological parameter estimation from cosmic microwave background data. While Metropolis-Hastings is dominated by overheads, CosmoHammer is able to accelerate the sampling process from a wall time of 30 hours on a dual core notebook to 16 minutes by scaling out to 2048 cores. Such short wall times for complex data sets opens possibilities for extensive model testing and control of systematics.