• The paradigm in which magnetic fields play a crucial role in launching/collimating outflows in many astrophysical objects continues to gain support. However, semi-analytical models including the effect of magnetic fields on the dynamics and morphology of jets are still missing due to the intrinsic difficulties in integrating the equations describing a collimated, relativistic flow in the presence of gravity. Only few solutions have been found so far, due to the highly nonlinear character of the equations together with the need to blindly search for singularities. These numerical problems prevented a full exploration of the parameter space. We present a new integration scheme to solve r-self-similar, stationary, axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics equations describing collimated, relativistic outflows crossing smoothly all the singular points (Alfven point and modified slow/fast points). For the first time, we are able to integrate from the disk mid-plane to downstream of the modified fast point. We discuss an ensemble of jet solutions, emphasising trends and features that can be compared to observables. We present, for the first time with a semi-analytical MHD model, solutions showing counter-rotation of the jet for a substantial fraction of its extent. We find diverse jet configurations with bulk Lorentz factors up to 10 and potential sites for recollimation between $10^3-10^7$ gravitational radii. Such extended coverage of the intervals of quantities, such as magnetic-to-thermal energy ratios at the base or the heights/widths of the recollimation region, makes our solutions suitable for application to many different systems where jets are launched.
  • Monitoring of Sagittarius A* from X-ray to radio wavelengths has revealed structured variability --- including X-ray flares --- but it is challenging to establish correlations between them. Most studies have focused on variability in the X-ray and infrared, where variations are often simultaneous, and because long time series at sub-millimeter and radio wavelengths are limited. Previous work on sub-mm and radio variability hints at a lag between X-ray flares and their candidate sub-millimeter or radio counterparts, with the long wavelength data lagging the X-ray. However, there is only one published time lag between an X-ray flare and a possible radio counterpart. Here we report 9 contemporaneous X-ray and radio observations of Sgr A*. We detect significant radio variability peaking $\gtrsim$176 minutes after the brightest X-ray flare ever detected from Sgr A*. We also report other potentially associated X-ray and radio variability, with the radio peaks appearing $\lesssim$80 minutes after these weaker X-ray flares. Taken at face value, these results suggest that stronger X-ray flares lead to longer time lags in the radio. However, we also test the possibility that the variability at X-ray and radio wavelengths is not temporally correlated. We cross-correlate data from mismatched X-ray and radio epochs and obtain comparable correlations to the matched data. Hence, we find no overall statistical evidence that X-ray flares and radio variability are correlated, underscoring a need for more simultaneous, long duration X-ray--radio monitoring of Sgr A*.
  • Millimeter wavelength polarimetry of accreting black hole systems can provide a tomographic probe of the accretion flow on a wide range of linear scales. We searched for linear polarization in two low luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN), M81 and M84, using the Combined Array for Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). We find upper limits of $\sim 1 - 2\%$ averaging over the full bandwidth and with a rotation measure (RM) synthesis technique. These low polarization fractions, along with similar low values for LLAGN M87 and 3C84, suggest that LLAGN have qualitatively different polarization properties than radio-loud sources and Sgr A*. If the sources are intrinsically polarized and then depolarized by Faraday rotation then we place lower limits on the RM of a few times $10^7\, {\rm rad\, m^{-2}}$ for the full bandwidth case and $\sim 10^9\, {\rm rad\, m^{-2}}$ for the RM synthesis analysis. These limits are inconsistent with or marginally consistent with expected accretion flow properties. Alternatively, the sources may be depolarized by cold electrons within a few Schwarzschild radii from the black hole, as suggested by numerical models.
  • We model the accretion of gas onto a population of massive primordial black holes in the Milky Way, and compare the predicted radio and X-ray emission with observational data. We show that under conservative assumptions on the accretion process, the possibility that ${\cal O}(10) \, M_\odot$ primordial black holes can account for all of the dark matter in the Milky Way is excluded at $5\sigma$ by a comparison with a VLA radio catalog at $1.4$ GHz, and at $\simeq 40\sigma$ by a comparison with a Chandra X-ray catalog ($0.5 - 8$ keV). We argue that this method can be used to identify such a population of primordial black holes with more sensitive future radio and X-ray surveys.
  • Understanding the origin of the flaring activity from the Galactic center supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*, is a major scientific goal of the NuSTAR Galactic plane survey campaign. We report on the data obtained between July 2012 and April 2015, including 27 observations on Sgr A* with a total exposure of ~ 1 Ms. We found a total of ten X-ray flares detected in the NuSTAR observation window, with luminosities in the range of $L_{3-79~keV}$~$(0.2-4.0) \times 10^{35}~erg~s^{-1}$. With this largest hard X-ray Sgr A* flare dataset to date, we studied the flare spectral properties. Seven flares are detected above 5{\sigma} significance, showing a range of photon indices ({\Gamma} ~ 2.0-2.8) with typical uncertainties of +/-0.5 (90% confidence level). We found no significant spectral hardening for brighter flares as indicated by a smaller sample. The accumulation of all the flare spectra in 1-79 keV can be well fit with an absorbed power-law model with {\Gamma}=2.2+/-0.1, and does not require the existence of a spectral break. The lack of variation in X-ray spectral index with luminosity would point to a single mechanism for the flares and is consistent with the synchrotron scenario. Lastly, we present the quiescent state spectrum of Sgr A*, and derived an upper limit on the quiescent luminosity of Sgr A* above 10 keV to be $L_{Xq, 10-79 keV}$ < $(2.9{\pm}0.2) \times 10^{34}~erg~s^{-1}$.
  • We have compiled a new multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) for the closest obscured low-ionization emission-line region active galactic nucleus (AGN), NGC 4736, also known as M94. The SED comprises mainly high-resolution (mostly sub-arcsecond, or, at the distance to M94, <23 pc from the nucleus) observations from the literature, archival data, as well as previously unpublished sub-millimetre data from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, in conjunction with new electronic MultiElement Radio Interferometric Network (e-MERLIN) L-band (1.5 GHz) observations. Thanks to the e-MERLIN resolution and sensitivity, we resolve for the first time a double structure composed of two radio sources separated by ~1 arcsec, previously observed only at higher frequency. We explore this data set, which further includes non-simultaneous data from the Very Large Array, the Gemini telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray observatory, in terms of an outflow-dominated model. We compare our results with previous trends found for other AGN using the same model (NGC 4051, M81*, M87 and Sgr A*), as well as hard- and quiescent-state X-ray binaries. We find that the nuclear broad-band spectrum of M94 is consistent with a relativistic outflow of low inclination. The findings in this work add to the growing body of evidence that the physics of weakly accreting black holes scales with mass in a rather straightforward fashion.
  • Radio observations of young stellar objects (YSOs) enable the study of ionised plasma outflows from young protostars via their free-free radiation. Previous studies of the low-mass young system T Tau have used radio observations to model the spectrum and estimate important physical properties of the associated ionised plasma (local electron density, ionised gas content and emission measure). However, without an indication of the low-frequency turnover in the free-free spectrum, these properties remain difficult to constrain. This paper presents the detection of T Tau at 149 MHz with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) - the first time a YSO has been observed at such low frequencies. The recovered total flux indicates that the free-free spectrum may be turning over near 149 MHz. The spectral energy distribution is fitted and yields improved constraints on local electron density ($(7.2 \pm 2.1)\times10^{3}$ cm$^{-3}$), ionised gas mass ($(1.0 \pm 1.8)\times10^{-6}$ M$_{\odot}$) and emission measure ($(1.67 \pm 0.14)\times10^5$ pc cm$^{-6}$).
  • The supermassive black hole at the centre of the Galaxy flares at least daily in the infrared (IR) and X-ray bands, yet the process driving these flares is still unknown. So far detailed analysis has only been performed on a few bright flares. In particular, the broadband spectral modelling suffers from a strong lack of simultaneous data. However, new monitoring campaigns now provide data on thousands of flaring events, allowing a statistical analysis of the flare properties. In this paper, we investigate the X-ray and IR flux distributions of the flare events. Using a self-consistent calculation of the particle distribution, we model the statistical properties of the flares. Based on a previous work on single flares, we consider two families of models: pure synchrotron models and synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models. We investigate the effect of fluctuations in some relevant parameters (e.g. acceleration properties, density, magnetic field) on the flux distributions. The distribution of these parameters is readily derived from the flux distributions observed at different wavelengths. In both scenarios, we find that fluctuations of the power injected in accelerated particles plays a major role. This must be distributed as a power-law (with different indices in each model). In the synchrotron dominated scenario, we derive the most extreme values of the acceleration power required to reproduce the brightest flares. In that model, the distribution of the acceleration slope fluctuations is constrained and in the SSC scenario we constrain the distributions of the correlated magnetic field and flow density variations.
  • Within the first 10 days after Swift discovered the jetted tidal disruption event (TDE) Sw J1644+57, simultaneous observations in the radio, near-infrared, optical, X-ray and gamma-ray bands were carried out. These multiwavelength data provide a unique opportunity to constrain the emission mechanism and make-up of a relativistic super-Eddington jet. We consider an exhaustive variety of radiation mechanisms for the generation of X-rays in this TDE, and rule out many processes such as SSC, photospheric and proton synchrotron. The infrared to gamma-ray data for Sw J1644+57 are consistent with synchrotron and external-inverse-Compton (EIC) processes provided that electrons in the jet are continuously accelerated on a time scale shorter than ~1% of the dynamical time to maintain a power-law distribution. The requirement of continuous electron acceleration points to magnetic reconnection in a Poynting flux dominated jet. The EIC process may require fine tuning to explain the observed temporal decay of the X-ray lightcurve, whereas the synchrotron process in a magnetic jet needs no fine tuning for this TDE.
  • We present coordinated multiwavelength observations of the high Galactic latitude (b=+50 deg) black hole X-ray binary (XRB) J1357.2-0933 in quiescence. Our broadband spectrum includes strictly simultaneous radio and X-ray observations, and near-infrared, optical, and ultraviolet data taken 1-2 days later. We detect Swift J1357.2-0933 at all wavebands except for the radio (f_5GHz < 3.9 uJy/beam). Given current constraints on the distance (2.3-6.3 kpc), its 0.5-10 keV X-ray flux corresponds to an Eddington ratio Lx/Ledd = 4e-9 -- 3e-8 (assuming a black hole mass of 10 Msun). The broadband spectrum is dominated by synchrotron radiation from a relativistic population of outflowing thermal electrons, which we argue to be a common signature of short-period quiescent BHXBs. Furthermore, we identify the frequency where the synchrotron radiation transitions from optically thick-to-thin (approximately 2-5e14 Hz, which is the most robust determination of a 'jet break' for a quiescent BHXB to date. Our interpretation relies on the presence of steep curvature in the ultraviolet spectrum, a frequency window made observable by the low amount of interstellar absorption along the line of sight. High Galactic latitude systems like Swift J1357.2-0933 with clean ultraviolet sightlines are crucial for understanding black hole accretion at low luminosities.
  • Over the last decade, the evidence is mounting that several aspects of black hole accretion physics proceed in a mass-invariant way. One of the best examples of this scaling is the empirical "Fundamental Plane of Black Hole Accretion" relation linking mass, radio and X-ray luminosity over eight orders of magnitude in black hole mass. The currently favored theoretical interpretation of this relation is that the physics governing power output in weakly accreting black holes depends more on relative accretion rate than on mass. In order to test this theory, we explore whether a mass-invariant approach can simultaneously explain the broadband spectral energy distributions from two black holes at opposite ends of the mass scale but at similar Eddington accretion fractions. We find that the same model, with the same value of several fitted physical parameters expressed in mass-scaling units to enforce self-similarity, can provide a good description of two datasets from V404 Cyg and M81*, a stellar and supermassive black hole, respectively. Furthermore, only one of several potential emission scenarios for the X-ray band is successful, suggesting it is the dominant process driving the Fundamental Plane relation at this accretion rate. This approach thus holds promise for breaking current degeneracies in the interpretation of black hole high-energy spectra, and for constructing better prescriptions of black hole accretion for use in various local and cosmological feedback applications.
  • The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the new generation very high-energy gamma-ray observatory, will improve the flux sensitivity of the current Cherenkov telescopes by an order of magnitude over a continuous range from about 10 GeV to above 100 TeV. With tens of telescopes distributed in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, the large effective area and field of view coupled with the fast pointing capability make CTA a crucial instrument for the detection and understanding of the physics of transient, short-timescale variability phenomena (e.g. Gamma-Ray Bursts, Active Galactic Nuclei, gamma-ray binaries, serendipitous sources). The key CTA system for the fast identification of flaring events is the Real-Time Analysis (RTA) pipeline, a science alert system that will automatically detect and generate science alerts with a maximum latency of 30 seconds with respect to the triggering event collection and ensure fast communication to/from the astrophysics community. According to the CTA design requirements, the RTA search for a true transient event should be performed on multiple time scales (from minutes to hours) with a sensitivity not worse than three times the nominal CTA sensitivity. Given the CTA requirement constraints on the RTA efficiency and the fast response ability demanded by the transient science, we perform a preliminary evaluation of the RTA sensitivity as a function of the CTA high-level technical performance (e.g. effective area, point spread function) and the observing time. This preliminary approach allows the exploration of the complex parameter space defined by the scientific and technological requirements, with the aim of defining the feasibility range of the input parameters and the minimum background rejection capability of the RTA pipeline.
  • The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the largest ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatories. The On-Site Analysis will be the first CTA scientific analysis of data acquired from the array of telescopes, in both northern and southern sites. The On-Site Analysis will have two pipelines: the Level-A pipeline (also known as Real-Time Analysis, RTA) and the level-B one. The RTA performs data quality monitoring and must be able to issue automated alerts on variable and transient astrophysical sources within 30 seconds from the last acquired Cherenkov event that contributes to the alert, with a sensitivity not worse than the one achieved by the final pipeline by more than a factor of 3. The Level-B Analysis has a better sensitivity (not be worse than the final one by a factor of 2) and the results should be available within 10 hours from the acquisition of the data: for this reason this analysis could be performed at the end of an observation or next morning. The latency (in particular for the RTA) and the sensitivity requirements are challenging because of the large data rate, a few GByte/s. The remote connection to the CTA candidate site with a rather limited network bandwidth makes the issue of the exported data size extremely critical and prevents any kind of processing in real-time of the data outside the site of the telescopes. For these reasons the analysis will be performed on-site with infrastructures co-located with the telescopes, with limited electrical power availability and with a reduced possibility of human intervention. This means, for example, that the on-site hardware infrastructure should have low-power consumption. A substantial effort towards the optimization of high-throughput computing service is envisioned to provide hardware and software solutions with high-throughput, low-power consumption at a low-cost.
  • We analyze the light curves of 413 radio sources at submillimeter wavelengths using data from the Submillimeter Array calibrator database. The database includes more than 20,000 observations at 1.3 and 0.8 mm that span 13 years. We model the light curves as a damped random walk and determine a characteristic time scale $\tau$ at which the variability amplitude saturates. For the vast majority of sources, primarily blazars and BL Lac objects, we find only lower limits on $\tau$. For two nearby low luminosity active galactic nuclei, M81 and M87, however, we measure $\tau=1.6^{+3.0}_{-0.9}$ days and $\tau=45^{+61}_{-24}$ days, respectively ($2\sigma$ errors). Including the previously measured $\tau=0.33\pm 0.16$ days for Sgr A*, we show an approximately linear correlation between $\tau$ and black hole mass for these nearby LLAGN. Other LLAGN with spectra that peak in the submm are expected to follow this correlation. These characteristic time scales are comparable to the minimum time scale for emission processes close to an event horizon, and suggest that the underlying physics may be independent of black hole mass, accretion rate, and jet luminosity.
  • We present a new way of describing the flares from Sgr A* with a self-consistent calculation of the particle distribution. All relevant radiative processes are taken into account in the evolution of the electron distribution and resulting spectrum. We present spectral modelling for new X-ray flares observed by NuSTAR, together with older observations in different wavelengths, and discuss the changes in plasma parameters to produce a flare. We show that under certain conditions, the real particle distribution can differ significantly from standard distributions assumed in most studies. We conclude that the flares are likely generated by magnetized plasma consistent with our understanding of the accretion flow. Including non-thermal acceleration, injection, escape, and cooling losses produces a spectrum with a break between the infrared and the X-ray, allowing a better simultaneous description of the different wavelengths. We favour the non-thermal synchrotron interpretation, assuming the infrared flare spectrum used is representative. We also consider the effects on Sgr A*s quiescent spectrum in the case of a density increase due to the G2 encounter with Sgr A*.
  • We report new observations with the Very Large Array, Atacama Large Millimeter Array, and Submillimeter Array at frequencies from 1.0 to 355 GHz of the Galactic Center black hole, Sagittarius A*. These observations were conducted between October 2012 and November 2014. While we see variability over the whole spectrum with an amplitude as large as a factor of 2 at millimeter wavelengths, we find no evidence for a change in the mean flux density or spectrum of Sgr A* that can be attributed to interaction with the G2 source. The absence of a bow shock at low frequencies is consistent with a cross-sectional area for G2 that is less than $2 \times 10^{29}$ cm$^2$. This result fits with several model predictions including a magnetically arrested cloud, a pressure-confined stellar wind, and a stellar photosphere of a binary merger. There is no evidence for enhanced accretion onto the black hole driving greater jet and/or accretion flow emission. Finally, we measure the millimeter wavelength spectral index of Sgr A* to be flat; combined with previous measurements, this suggests that there is no spectral break between 230 and 690 GHz. The emission region is thus likely in a transition between optically thick and thin at these frequencies and requires a mix of lepton distributions with varying temperatures consistent with stratification.
  • Radio and mm-wavelength observations of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the radio source associated with the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy, show that it behaves as a partially self-absorbed synchrotron-emitting source. The measured size of Sgr A* shows that the mm-wavelength emission comes from a small region and consists of the inner accretion flow and a possible collimated outflow. Existing observations of Sgr A* have revealed a time lag between light curves at 43 GHz and 22 GHz, which is consistent with a rapidly expanding plasma flow and supports the presence of a collimated outflow from the environment of an accreting black hole. Here we wish to measure simultaneous frequency-dependent time lags in the light curves of Sgr A* across a broad frequency range to constrain direction and speed of the radio-emitting plasma in the vicinity of the black hole. Light curves of Sgr A* were taken in May 2012 using ALMA at 100 GHz using the VLA at 48, 39, 37, 27, 25.5, and 19 GHz. As a result of elevation limits and the longitude difference between the stations, the usable overlap in the light curves is approximately four hours. Although Sgr A* was in a relatively quiet phase, the high sensitivity of ALMA and the VLA allowed us to detect and fit maxima of an observed minor flare where flux density varied by ~10%. The fitted times of flux density maxima at frequencies from 100 GHz to 19 GHz, as well as a cross-correlation analysis, reveal a simple frequency-dependent time lag relation where maxima at higher frequencies lead those at lower frequencies. Taking the observed size-frequency relation of Sgr A* into account, these time lags suggest a moderately relativistic (lower estimates: 0.5c for two-sided, 0.77c for one-sided) collimated outflow.
  • The nature of black hole jets at the lowest detectable luminosities remains an open question, largely due to a dearth of observational constraints. Here, we present a new, nearly-simultaneous broadband spectrum of the black hole X-ray binary (BHXB) XTE J1118+480 at an extremely low Eddington ratio (L_x~1e-8.5 L_Edd). Our new spectral energy distribution (SED) includes the radio, near-infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavebands. XTE J1118 is now the second BHXB at such a low Eddington ratio with a well-sampled SED, providing new constraints on highly sub-Eddington accretion flows and jets, and opening the door for comparison studies. We apply a multi-zone jet model to the new broadband SED, and we compare our results to previous fits to the same source using the same model at 4-5 decades higher luminosity. We find that after a BHXB transitions to the so-called quiescent spectral state, the jet base becomes more compact (by up to an order of magnitude) and slightly cooler (by at least a factor of two). Our preferred model fit indicates that jet particle acceleration is weaker after the transition into quiescence. That is, accelerated non-thermal particles no longer reach high enough Lorentz factors to contribute significant amounts of synchrotron X-ray emission. Instead, the X-ray waveband is dominated by synchrotron self-Compton emission from a population of mildly relativistic electrons with a quasi-thermal velocity distribution associated with the jet base. The corresponding (thermal) synchrotron component emits primarily in the infrared through ultraviolet wavebands. Our results on XTE J1118 are consistent with broadband modeling for A0620-00 and for Sgr A*. The above could therefore represent a canonical baseline geometry for accreting black holes in quiescence. We conclude with suggestions for future studies to further investigate the above scenario.
  • We report the detection of the two-dimensional structure of the radio source associated with the Galactic Center black hole, Sagittarius A*, obtained from Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at a wavelength of 7mm. The intrinsic source is modeled as an elliptical Gaussian with major axis size 35.4 x 12.6 R_S in position angle 95 deg East of North. This morphology can be interpreted in the context of both jet and accretion disk models for the radio emission. There is supporting evidence in large angular-scale multi-wavelength observations for both source models for a preferred axis near 95 deg. We also place a maximum peak-to-peak change of 15% in the intrinsic major axis size over five different epochs. Three observations were triggered by detection of near infrared (NIR) flares and one was simultaneous with a large X-ray flare detected by NuSTAR. The absence of simultaneous and quasi-simultaneous flares indicates that not all high energy events produce variability at radio wavelengths. This supports the conclusion that NIR and X-ray flares are primarily due to electron excitation and not to an enhanced accretion rate onto the black hole.
  • Various radio galaxies show signs of having gone through episodic jet outbursts in the past. An example is the class of double-double radio galaxies (DDRGs). However, to follow the evolution of an individual source in real-time is impossible due to the large time scales involved. Numerical studies provide a powerful tool to investigate the temporal behavior of episodic jet outbursts in a (magneto-)hydrodynamical setting. We simulate the injection of two jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN), separated by a short interruption time. Three different jet models are compared. We find that an AGN jet outburst cycle can be divided into four phases. The most prominent phase occurs when the restarted jet is propagating completely inside the hot and inflated cocoon left behind by the initial jet. In that case, the jet-head advance speed of the restarted jet is significantly higher than the initial jet-head. While the head of the initial jet interacts strongly with the ambient medium, the restarted jet propagates almost unimpeded. As a result, the restarted jet maintains a strong radial integrity. Just a very small fraction of the amount of shocked jet material flows back through the cocoon compared to that of the initial jet and much weaker shocks are found at the head of the restarted jet. We find that the features of the restarted jet in this phase closely resemble the observed properties of a typical DDRG.
  • Magnetically arrested accretion discs (MADs), where the magnetic pressure in the inner disc is dynamically important, provide an alternative mechanism for regulating accretion to what is commonly assumed in black hole systems. We show that a global magnetic field inversion in the MAD state can destroy the jet, significantly increase the accretion rate, and move the effective inner disc edge in to the marginally stable orbit. Reconnection of the MAD field in the inner radii launches a new type of transient outflow containing hot plasma generated by magnetic dissipation. This transient outflow can be as powerful as the steady magnetically-dominated Blandford-Znajek jet in the MAD state. The field inversion qualitatively describes many of the observational features associated with the high luminosity hard to soft state transition in black hole X-ray binaries: the jet line, the transient ballistic jet, and the drop in rms variability. These results demonstrate that the magnetic field configuration can influence the accretion state directly, and hence the magnetic field structure is an important second parameter in explaining observations of accreting black holes across the mass and luminosity scales.
  • We present a new, semi-analytic formalism to model the acceleration and collimation of relativistic jets in a gravitational potential. The gravitational energy density includes the kinetic, thermal, and electromagnetic mass contributions. The solutions are close to self-similar throughout the integration, from very close to the black hole to the region where gravity is unimportant. The field lines are tied to the conditions very close to the central object and eventually overcollimate, possibly leading to a collimation shock. This collimation shock could provide the conditions for diffusive shock acceleration, leading to the observed electron populations with a power-law energy distribution in jets. We provide the derivation, a detailed analysis of a solution, and describe the effects the parameters have on the properties of the solutions, such as the Lorentz factor and location of the collimation shock. We also discuss the deviations from self-similarity. By comparing the new gravity term with the gravity term obtained from a non-relativistic formalism in a previous work, we show they are equivalent in the non-relativistic limit. This equivalence shows the approach taken in that work is valid and allows us to comment on its limitations.
  • The center of our Galaxy hosts the best constrained supermassive black hole in the universe, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). Its mass and distance have been accurately determined from stellar orbits and proper motion studies, respectively, and its high-frequency radio, and highly variable near-infrared and X-ray emission originate from within a few Schwarzschild radii of the event horizon. The theory of general relativity (GR) predicts the appearance of a black hole shadow, which is a lensed image of the event horizon. This shadow can be resolved by very long baseline radio interferometry and test basic predictions of GR and alternatives thereof. In this paper we review our current understanding of the physical properties of Sgr A*, with a particular emphasis on the radio properties, the black hole shadow, and models for the emission and appearance of the source. We argue that the Galactic Center holds enormous potential for experimental tests of black hole accretion and theories of gravitation in their strong limits.
  • We outline the science prospects for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating at energies above few tens of GeV. With its low energy threshold, large effective area and rapid slewing capabilities, CTA will be able to measure the spectra and variability of GRBs at multi-GeV energies with unprecedented photon statistics, and thereby break new ground in elucidating the physics of GRBs, which is still poorly understood. Such measurements will also provide crucial diagnostics of ultra-high-energy cosmic ray and neutrino production in GRBs, advance observational cosmology by probing the high-redshift extragalactic background light and intergalactic magnetic fields, and contribute to fundamental physics by testing Lorentz invariance violation with high precision. Aiming to quantify these goals, we present some simulated observations of GRB spectra and light curves, together with estimates of their detection rates with CTA. Although the expected detection rate is modest, of order a few GRBs per year, hundreds or more high-energy photons per burst may be attainable once they are detected. We also address various issues related to following up alerts from satellites and other facilities with CTA, as well as follow-up observations at other wavelengths. The possibility of discovering and observing GRBs from their onset including short GRBs during a wide-field survey mode is also briefly discussed.
  • A subset of ultraluminous X-ray sources (those with luminosities < 10^40 erg/s) are thought to be powered by the accretion of gas onto black holes with masses of ~5-20 M_solar, probably via an accretion disc. The X-ray and radio emission are coupled in such Galactic sources, with the radio emission originating in a relativistic jet thought to be launched from the innermost regions near the black hole, with the most powerful emission occurring when the rate of infalling matter approaches a theoretical maximum (the Eddington limit). Only four such maximal sources are known in the Milky Way, and the absorption of soft X-rays in the interstellar medium precludes determining the causal sequence of events that leads to the ejection of the jet. Here we report radio and X-ray observations of a bright new X-ray source whose peak luminosity can exceed 10^39 erg/s in the nearby galaxy, M31. The radio luminosity is extremely high and shows variability on a timescale of tens of minutes, arguing that the source is highly compact and powered by accretion close to the Eddington limit onto a stellar mass black hole. Continued radio and X-ray monitoring of such sources should reveal the causal relationship between the accretion flow and the powerful jet emission.