• Thanks to the detections of more than 3000 exoplanets these last 20 years, statistical studies have already highlighted some properties in the distribution of the planet parameters. Nevertheless, few studies have yet investigated the planet populations from short to large separations around the same star since this requires the use of different detection techniques that usually target different types of stars. We wish to develop a tool that combines direct and indirect methods so as to correctly investigate the giant planet populations at all separations. We developed the MESS2 code, a Monte Carlo simulation code combining radial velocity and direct imaging data obtained at different epochs for a given star to estimate the detection probability of giant planets spanning a wide range of physical separations. It is based on the generation of synthetic planet populations. We apply MESS2 on a young M1-type, the nearby star AUMic observed with HARPS and NACO/ESO. We show that giant planet detection limits are significantly improved at intermediate separations (~20au in the case of AUMic). We show that the traditional approach of analysing independently the RV and DI detection limits systematically overestimates the planet detection limits and hence planet occurrence rates. The use of MESS2 allows to obtain correct planet occurrence rates in statistical studies, making use of multi-epoch DI data and/or RV measurements. We also show that MESS2 can optimise the schedule of future DI observations.
  • In case of pre-main sequence objects, the only way to determine age and mass is by fitting theoretical isochrones on color-magnitude (alternatively luminosity-temperature) diagrams. Since young stellar objects exhibit photometric variability over wide range in magnitude and colors, the age and mass determined by fitting isochrones is expected to be inaccurate, if not erroneous. These in turn will badly affect any study carried out on age spread and process of star formation. Since we have carried out very extensive photometric observations of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), we decided to use our multi-band data to explore the influence of variability in determining mass and age of cluster members. In this study, we get the amplitudes of the photometric variability in V, R, and I optical bands of a sample of 346 ONC members and use it to investigate how the variability affects the inferred masses and ages and if it alone can take account for the age spread among the ONC members reported by earlier studies. We find that members that show periodic and smooth photometric rotational modulation have their masses and ages unaffected by variability. On other hand, we found that members with periodic but very scattered photometric rotational modulation and members with irregular variability have their masses and ages significantly affected. Moreover, using Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams we find that the observed I band photometric variability can take account of only a fraction (about 50%) of the inferred age spread, whereas the V band photometric variability is large enough to mask any age spread.
  • The recent development of brand new observational techniques and theoretical models have greatly advanced the exoplanet research field. Despite significant achievements, which have allowed the detection of thousands extrasolar systems, a comprehensive understanding of planetary formation and evolution mechanisms is still desired. One relevant limitation is given by the accuracy in the measurements of planet-host star ages. The star GJ 504 has been found to host a substellar companion whose nature is strongly debated. There has been a recent difference of opinion in the literature owing to the uncertainty on the age of the system: a young age of $\sim$ 160 Myr would imply a giant planet as a companion, but a recent revision pointing to a solar age ($\sim$ 4 Gyr) instead suggests a brown dwarf. With the aim of shedding light on this debated topic, we have carried out a high-resolution spectroscopic study of GJ 504 to derive stellar parameters, metallicity, and abundances of both light and heavy elements, providing a full chemical characterisation. The main objective is to infer clues on the evolutionary stage (hence the age) of this system. We performed a strictly differential (line-by-line) analysis of GJ 504 with respect to two reference stars, that is the planet-host dwarf $\iota$ Hor and the subgiant HIP 84827. The former is crucial in this context because its stellar parameters (hence the evolutionary stage) is well constrained from asteroseismic observations. Regardless of the zero point offsets, our differential approach allows us to put tight constraints on the age of GJ 504 with respect to $\iota$ Hor, thereby minimising the internal uncertainties. We found that the surface gravity of GJ 504 is 0.2 $\pm$ 0.07 dex lower than that of the main-sequence star $\iota$ Hor, suggesting a past turn-off evolution[...]
  • Equal-mass stars in young open clusters and loose associations exhibit a wide spread of rotation periods, which likely originates from differences in the initial rotation periods and in the primordial disc lifetimes. We want to explore if the gravitational effects by nearby companions may play an additional role in producing the observed rotation period spread. We measure the photometric rotation periods of components of multiple stellar systems and look for correlations of the period differences among the components to their reciprocal distances. In this paper, we analysed the triple system AU Mic + AT Mic A&B in the 25-Myr beta Pictoris Association. We have retrieved from the literature the rotation period of AU Mic (P = 4.85d) and measured from photometric archival data the rotation periods of both components of AT Mic (P = 1.19d and P = 0.78d) for the first time. Moreover, we detected a high rate of flare events from AT Mic. Whereas the distant component AU Mic has evolved rotationally as a single star, the A and B components of AT Mic, separated by about 27 AU, exhibit a rotation rate a factor 5 larger than AU Mic. Moreover, the A and B components, despite have about equal mass, show a significant difference (about 40%) between their rotation periods. A possible explanation is that the gravitational forces between the A and B components of AT Mic (that are a factor about 7.3 x 10^6 more intense than those between AU Mic and AT Mic) have enhanced the dispersal of the AT Mic primordial disc, shortening its lifetime and the disc-locking phase duration, making the component A and B of AT Mic to rotate faster than the more distant AU Mic. We suspect that a different level of magnetic activity between the A and B components of AT Mic may be the additional parameter responsible for the difference between their rotation periods.
  • We have carried out a multi-band photometric monitoring of the close visual binary GJ3039, consisting of a M4 primary and a fainter secondary component, and likely member of the young stellar association $\beta$ Pictoris (24-Myr old). From our analysis we found that both components are photometric variables and, for the first time, we detected two micro-flare events. We measured from periodogram analysis of the photometric time series two rotation periods P = 3.355d and P = 0.925d, that we could attribute to the brighter GJ3039A and the fainter GJ3039B components, respectively. A comparison of these rotation periods with the period distribution of other $\beta$ Pictoris members further supports that GJ3039A is a member of this association. We find that also GJ3039B could be a member, but the infrared magnitude differences between the two components taken from the literature and the photometric variability, which is found to be comparable in both stars, suggest that GJ3039B could be a foreground star physically unbound to the primary A component.
  • We present the results of our analysis on V1481 Ori (JW 239), a young SB2 in the Orion Nebula Cluster with a circumbinary disc accreting on the lower-mass component. The analysis is based on high-resolution spectroscopic data and high-quality photometric time series about 20-yr long. Thanks to the spectroscopy, we confirm the binary nature of this system consisting of M3 + M4 components and derive the mass ratio M_B/M_A = 0.54, a variable luminosity ratio L_B/L_A = 0.68--0.94, and an orbital period P_orb = 4.433d. The photometric data allowed us to measure the rotation periods of the two components P_phot = 4.4351d and they are found to be synchronized with the orbital period. The simultaneous modeling of V-, I-band, and radial velocity curves in the 2005 season suggests that the variability is dominated by one hot spot on the secondary component covering at least about 3.5% of the stellar surface and about 420K hotter than the unperturbed photosphere. Such a spot may originate from the material of the circumbinary disc accreting onto the secondary component. We also detect an apparent 6-yr periodic variation in the position of this hot spot, which is inferred from the phase migration of the light curve maximum, which we interpret as due to either the presence of surface differential rotation as large as 0.065%, a value compatible with the fully convective components, or to a periodic exchange of angular momentum between the disc and the star, which implies a minimum magnetic field strength of 650G at the stellar surface.
  • We measure the photometric rotation periods of the components of multiple systems in young stellar associations to investigate the causes of the observed rotation period dispersion. We present the case of the wide binary AG Tri in the 23-Myr young beta Pictoris Association consisting of K4 + M1 dwarfs. Our multi-band, multi-season photometric monitoring allowed us to measure the rotation periods of both components P_A = 12.4d and P_B = 4.66d, to detect a prominent magnetic activity in the photosphere, likely responsible for the measured radial velocity variations, and for the first time, a flare event on the M1 component AG Tri B. We investigate either the possibility that the faster rotating component may have suffered an enhanced primordial disc dispersal, starting its PMS spin-up earlier than the slower rotating component, or the possibility that the formation of a debris disc may have prevented AG Tri A from gaining part of the angular momentum from the accreting disc.
  • We present the first optical (590--890 nm) imaging polarimetry observations of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the young solar analog LkCa 15, addressing a number of open questions raised by previous studies. We detect the previously unseen far side of the disk gap, confirm the highly eccentric scattered-light gap shape that was postulated from near-infrared imaging, at odds with the symmetric gap inferred from millimeter interferometry. Furthermore, we resolve the inner disk for the first time and trace it out to 30 AU. This new source of scattered light may contribute to the near-infrared interferometric signal attributed to the protoplanet candidate LkCa 15 b, which lies embedded in the outer regions of the inner disk. Finally, we present a new model for the system architecture of LkCa 15 that ties these new findings together. These observations were taken during science verification of SPHERE ZIMPOL and demonstrate this facility's performance for faint guide stars under adverse observing conditions.
  • We present the results of a multi-filter photometric monitoring of the wide binary HIP10680/HIP10679. We found both component to be variable with amplitude up to $\Delta$V = 0.03 mag in the case of HIP10680 and $\Delta$V = 0.07 mag in the case of HIP10679. We could measure the rotation periods P = 0.2396d of the hotter F5V component HIP10680 and P = 0.777d of the cooler G5V component HIP10679. We found that the rotation axes of both components are aligned with an inclination $i$ = $\sim$ 10$^{\circ}$. Although the two components have a mass difference not larger than 15%, they exhibit a significant difference between their rotation periods. Such difference may arise either from different initial rotation periods or to different disc life times. For instance, the slower rotating component HIP 10679 hosts a well know debris disc.
  • Stellar rotation depends on different parameters. The range of values of these parameters causes the dispersion in the rotation period distributions observed in young stellar clusters/associations. We focus our investigation on the effects of different circumstellar environments on stellar rotation. More specifically, we are searching in stellar Associations for visual triple systems where all stellar parameters are similar, with the only exceptions of the unknown initial rotation period, and of the circum-stellar environment, in the sense that one of the two about equal-mass components has a close-by third 'perturber' component. In the present study we analyse the 35-Myr old visual triple system TYC 9300-0891-1AB + TYC 9300-0529-1 in the young Octans stellar association consisting of three equal-mass K0V components. We collected from the literature all information that allowed us to infer that the three components are actually physically bound forming a triple system and are members of the Octans Association. We collected broad-band photometric timeseries in two observation seasons. We discovered that all the components are variable, magnetically active, and from periodogram analysis we found the unresolved components TYC 9300-0891-1AB to have a rotation period P = 1.383d and TYC 9300-0529-1 a rotation period P = 1.634d. TYC 9300-0891-1A, TYC 9300-0891-1B, and TYC 9300-0529-1 have same masses, ages, and initial chemical compositions. The relatively small 16% rotation period difference measured by us indicates that all components had similar initial rotation periods and disc lifetimes, and the separation of 157AU between the component A and the 'perturber' component B (or vice-versa) has been sufficiently large to prevent any significant perturbation/shortening of the accretion-disc lifetime.
  • We are carrying out a series of photometric monitoring to measure the rotation periods of members in the young $\beta$ Pictoris Association, as part of the RACE-OC project (Rotation and ACtivity Evolution in Open Clusters). In this paper, we present the results for HD 155555C which is believed to be physically associated to the spectroscopic binary V824 Ara (HD155555) and thus constituting a triple system. We collected B, V, and R-band photometric data timeseries and discovered from periodogram analysis the rotation period P = 4.43d. Combined with stellar radius and projected rotational velocity, we find this star almost equator-on with an inclination $i$ $\simeq$ 90$^{\circ}$. The rotational properties of HD155555C fit well into the period distribution of other $\beta$ Pic members, giving further support to the suggested membership to the association and to its physical association to V824 Ara. A comparison with Pre-Main-Sequence isochrones from various models allows us to estimate an age of 20$\pm$15 Myr for this triple system.
  • We present some preliminary results from our program of intensive near-infrared photometric monitoring of a sample of confirmed and candidate Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) conducted from 2008 to 2010. Clear long-term variability has been observed for Wray 17-96 and V481 Sct, with overall brightness variation greater than 1 mag in the J band. Other sources, such as LBV 1806-20 showed detectable variability with amplitudes of few tenths of a magnitude with time-scale of about 60 days.
  • The debris disk known as "The Moth" is named after its unusually asymmetric surface brightness distribution. It is located around the ~90 Myr old G8V star HD 61005 at 34.5 pc and has previously been imaged by the HST at 1.1 and 0.6 microns. Polarimetric observations suggested that the circumstellar material consists of two distinct components, a nearly edge-on disk or ring, and a swept-back feature, the result of interaction with the interstellar medium. We resolve both components at unprecedented resolution with VLT/NACO H-band imaging. Using optimized angular differential imaging techniques to remove the light of the star, we reveal the disk component as a distinct narrow ring at inclination i=84.3 \pm 1.0{\deg}. We determine a semi-major axis of a=61.25 \pm 0.85 AU and an eccentricity of e=0.045 \pm 0.015, assuming that periastron is located along the apparent disk major axis. Therefore, the ring center is offset from the star by at least 2.75 \pm 0.85 AU. The offset, together with a relatively steep inner rim, could indicate a planetary companion that perturbs the remnant planetesimal belt. From our imaging data we set upper mass limits for companions that exclude any object above the deuterium-burning limit for separations down to 0.3". The ring shows a strong brightness asymmetry along both the major and minor axis. A brighter front side could indicate forward-scattering grains, while the brightness difference between the NE and SW components can be only partly explained by the ring center offset, suggesting additional density enhancements on one side of the ring. The swept-back component appears as two streamers originating near the NE and SW edges of the debris ring.
  • Since 2004, we have been engaged in a long-term observing program to monitor young stellar objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster. We have collected about two thousands frames in V, R, and I broad-band filters on more than two hundred nights distributed over five consecutive observing seasons. The high-quality and time-extended photometric data give us an opportunity to address various phenomena associated with young stars. The prime motivations of this project are i) to explore various manifestations of stellar magnetic activity in very young low-mass stars; ii) to search for new pre-main sequence eclipsing binaries; and iii) to look for any EXor and FUor like transient activities associated with YSOs. Since this is the first paper on this program, we give a detailed description of the science drivers, the observation and the data reduction strategies as well. In addition to these, we also present a large number of new periodic variables detected from our first five years of time-series photometric data. Our study reveals that about 72% of CTTS in our FoV are periodic, whereas, the percentage of periodic WTTS is just 32%. This indicates that inhomogeneities patterns on the surface of CTTS of the ONC stars are much more stable than on WTTS. From our multi-year monitoring campaign we found that the photometric surveys based on single-season are incapable of identifying all periodic variables. And any study on evolution of angular momentum based on single-season surveys must be carried out with caution.
  • CoRoT-2a is a young (about 0.5 Gyr) G7V star accompanied by a transiting hot-Jupiter, discovered by the CoRoT satellite (Alonso et al. 2008; Bouchy et al. 2008). An analysis of its photospheric activity, based on spot modelling techniques previously developed by our group for the analysis of the Sun as a star, shows that the active regions on CoRoT-2a arised within two active longitudes separated by about 180 degrees and rotating with periods of 4.5221 and 4.5543 days, respectively, at epoch of CoRoT observations (112 continous days centered at 2007.6). We show that the total spotted area oscillates with a period of about about 8.9 days, a value close to 10 times the synodic period of the planet with respect to the active longitude pattern rotating in 4.5221 days. Moreover, the variance of the stellar flux is modulated in phase with the planet orbital period. This suggests a possible star-planet magnetic interaction, a phenomenon already seen in other extrasolar planetary systems hosting hot-Jupiters.