• Quantum discord measures quantum correlation by comparing the quantum mutual information with the maximal amount of mutual information accessible to a quantum measurement. This paper analyzes the properties of diagonal discord, a simplified version of discord that compares quantum mutual information with the mutual information revealed by a measurement that correspond to the eigenstates of the local density matrices. In contrast to the optimized discord, diagonal discord is easily computable; it also finds connections to thermodynamics and resource theory. Here we further show that, for the generic case of non-degenerate local density matrices, diagonal discord exhibits desirable properties as a preferable discord measure. We employ the theory of resource destroying maps [Liu/Hu/Lloyd, PRL 118, 060502 (2017)] to prove that diagonal discord is monotonically nonincreasing under the operation of local discord nongenerating qudit channels, $d>2$, and provide numerical evidence that such monotonicity holds for qubit channels as well. We also show that it is continuous, and derive a Fannes-like continuity bound. Our results hold for a variety of simple discord measures generalized from diagonal discord.
  • Quantum computing allows for the potential of significant advancements in both the speed and the capacity of widely used machine learning techniques. Here we employ quantum algorithms for the Hopfield network, which can be used for pattern recognition, reconstruction, and optimization as a realization of a content-addressable memory system. We show that an exponentially large network can be stored in a polynomial number of quantum bits by encoding the network into the amplitudes of quantum states. By introducing a classical technique for operating the Hopfield network, we can leverage quantum algorithms to obtain a quantum computational complexity that is logarithmic in the dimension of the data. We also present an application of our method as a genetic sequence recognizer.
  • Optimization problems in disciplines such as machine learning are commonly solved with iterative methods. Gradient descent algorithms find local minima by moving along the direction of steepest descent while Newton's method takes into account curvature information and thereby often improves convergence. Here, we develop quantum versions of these iterative optimization algorithms and apply them to polynomial optimization with a unit norm constraint. In each step, multiple copies of the current candidate are used to improve the candidate using quantum phase estimation, an adapted quantum principal component analysis scheme, as well as quantum matrix multiplications and inversions. The required operations perform polylogarithmically in the dimension of the solution vector and exponentially in the number of iterations. Therefore, the quantum algorithm can be beneficial for high-dimensional problems where a small number of iterations is sufficient.
  • The entanglement properties of random quantum states or dynamics are important to the study of a broad spectrum of disciplines of physics, ranging from quantum information to high energy and many-body physics. This work investigates the interplay between the degrees of entanglement and randomness in pure states and unitary channels. We reveal strong connections between designs (distributions of states or unitaries that match certain moments of the uniform Haar measure) and generalized entropies (entropic functions that depend on certain powers of the density operator), by showing that R\'enyi entanglement entropies averaged over designs of the same order are almost maximal. This strengthens the celebrated Page's theorem. Moreover, we find that designs of an order that is logarithmic in the dimension maximize all R\'enyi entanglement entropies, and so are completely random in terms of the entanglement spectrum. Our results relate the behaviors of R\'enyi entanglement entropies to the complexity of scrambling and quantum chaos in terms of the degree of randomness, and suggest a generalization of the fast scrambling conjecture.
  • Scrambling is a process by which the state of a quantum system is effectively randomized due to the global entanglement that "hides" initially localized quantum information. In this work, we lay the mathematical foundations of studying randomness complexities beyond scrambling by entanglement properties. We do so by analyzing the generalized (in particular R\'enyi) entanglement entropies of designs, i.e. ensembles of unitary channels or pure states that mimic the uniformly random distribution (given by the Haar measure) up to certain moments. A main collective conclusion is that the R\'enyi entanglement entropies averaged over designs of the same order are almost maximal. This links the orders of entropy and design, and therefore suggests R\'enyi entanglement entropies as diagnostics of the randomness complexity of corresponding designs. Such complexities form a hierarchy between information scrambling and Haar randomness. As a strong separation result, we prove the existence of (state) 2-designs such that the R\'enyi entanglement entropies of higher orders can be bounded away from the maximum. However, we also show that the min entanglement entropy is maximized by designs of order only logarithmic in the dimension of the system. In other words, logarithmic-designs already achieve the complexity of Haar in terms of entanglement, which we also call max-scrambling. This result leads to a generalization of the fast scrambling conjecture, that max-scrambling can be achieved by physical dynamics in time roughly linear in the number of degrees of freedom.
  • Fuelled by increasing computer power and algorithmic advances, machine learning techniques have become powerful tools for finding patterns in data. Since quantum systems produce counter-intuitive patterns believed not to be efficiently produced by classical systems, it is reasonable to postulate that quantum computers may outperform classical computers on machine learning tasks. The field of quantum machine learning explores how to devise and implement concrete quantum software that offers such advantages. Recent work has made clear that the hardware and software challenges are still considerable but has also opened paths towards solutions.
  • Generative adversarial networks (GANs) represent a powerful tool for classical machine learning: a generator tries to create statistics for data that mimics those of a true data set, while a discriminator tries to discriminate between the true and fake data. The learning process for generator and discriminator can be thought of as an adversarial game, and under reasonable assumptions, the game converges to the point where the generator generates the same statistics as the true data and the discriminator is unable to discriminate between the true and the generated data. This paper introduces the notion of quantum generative adversarial networks (QuGANs), where the data consists either of quantum states, or of classical data, and the generator and discriminator are equipped with quantum information processors. We show that the unique fixed point of the quantum adversarial game also occurs when the generator produces the same statistics as the data. Since quantum systems are intrinsically probabilistic the proof of the quantum case is different from - and simpler than - the classical case. We show that when the data consists of samples of measurements made on high-dimensional spaces, quantum adversarial networks may exhibit an exponential advantage over classical adversarial networks.
  • This paper proposes a method of unifying quantum mechanics and gravity based on quantum computation. In this theory, fundamental processes are described in terms of pairwise interactions between quantum degrees of freedom. The geometry of space-time is a construct, derived from the underlying quantum information processing. The computation gives rise to a superposition of four-dimensional spacetimes, each of which obeys the Einstein-Regge equations. The theory makes explicit predictions for the back-reaction of the metric to computational `matter,' black-hole evaporation, holography, and quantum cosmology.
  • We show that without quantum correlations, energy cannot flow. The result follows from a simple theorem that shows that systems whose dynamics do not generate quantum discord are effectively non-interacting. We show that the rate of heat transfer between two quantum systems at different temperatures is directly proportional to the instantaneous rate of increase of diagonal/energetic discord between the systems. Consequently, nanoscale heat transfer experiments can be used to measure discord directly. We report the results of a measurement of the increase in discord due to nanoscale heat flow across an aluminum-sapphire interface and find it to be $4.28 \times 10^{24}$ ${\rm bits}\,{\rm m^{-2}}\,{\rm K^{-1}}\,{\rm s^{-1}}$.
  • Quantum hypothesis testing is one of the most basic tasks in quantum information theory and has fundamental links with quantum communication and estimation theory. In this paper, we establish a formula that characterizes the decay rate of the minimal Type-II error probability in a quantum hypothesis test of two Gaussian states given a fixed constraint on the Type-I error probability. This formula is a direct function of the mean vectors and covariance matrices of the quantum Gaussian states in question. We give an application to quantum illumination, which is the task of determining whether there is a low-reflectivity object embedded in a target region with a bright thermal-noise bath. For the asymmetric-error setting, we find that a quantum illumination transmitter can achieve an error probability exponent stronger than a coherent-state transmitter of the same mean photon number, and furthermore, that it requires far fewer trials to do so. This occurs when the background thermal noise is either low or bright, which means that a quantum advantage is even easier to witness than in the symmetric-error setting because it occurs for a larger range of parameters. Going forward from here, we expect our formula to have applications in settings well beyond those considered in this paper, especially to quantum communication tasks involving quantum Gaussian channels.
  • We provide $poly\log$ sparse quantum codes for correcting the erasure channel arbitrarily close to the capacity. Specifically, we provide $[[n, k, d]]$ quantum stabilizer codes that correct for the erasure channel arbitrarily close to the capacity if the erasure probability is at least $0.33$, and with a generating set $\langle S_1, S_2, ... S_{n-k} \rangle$ such that $|S_i|\leq \log^{2+\zeta}(n)$ for all $i$ and for any $\zeta > 0$ with high probability. In this work we show that the result of Delfosse et al. is tight: one can construct capacity approaching codes with weight almost $O(1)$.
  • Physical processes thatobtain, process, and erase information involve tradeoffs between information and energy. The fundamental energetic value of a bit of information exchanged with a reservoir at temperature T is kT ln2. This paper investigates the situation in which information is missing about just what physical process is about to take place. The fundamental energetic value of such information can be far greater than kT ln2 per bit.
  • Free energy is energy that is available to do work. Maximizing the free energy gain and the gain in work that can be extracted from a system is important for a wide variety of physical and technological processes, from energy harvesting processes such as photosynthesis to energy storage systems such as fuels and batteries. This paper extends recent results from non-equilibrium thermodynamics and quantum resource theory to derive closed-form solutions for the maximum possible gain in free energy and extractable work that can be obtained by varying the initial states of classical and quantum stochastic processes. Simple formulae allow the comparison the free energy increase for the optimal procedure with that for a sub-optimal procedure. The problem of finding the optimal free-energy harvesting procedure is shown to be convex and solvable via gradient descent.
  • Resource theory is a widely-applicable framework for analyzing the physical resources required for given tasks, such as computation, communication, and energy extraction. In this paper, we propose a general scheme for analyzing resource theories based on resource destroying maps, which leave resource-free states unchanged but erase the resource stored in all other states. We introduce a group of general conditions that determine whether a quantum operation exhibits typical resource-free properties in relation to a given resource destroying map. Our theory reveals fundamental connections among basic elements of resource theories, in particular, free states, free operations, and resource measures. In particular, we define a class of simple resource measures that can be calculated without optimization, and that are monotone nonincreasing under operations that commute with the resource destroying map. We apply our theory to the resources of coherence and quantum correlations (e.g., discord), two prominent features of nonclassicality.
  • We investigate graphs that can be disconnected into small components by removing a vanishingly small fraction of their vertices. We show that when a quantum network is described by such a graph, the network is efficiently controllable, in the sense that universal quantum computation can be performed using a control sequence polynomial in the size of the network while controlling a vanishingly small fraction of subsystems. We show that networks corresponding to finite-dimensional lattices are efficently controllable, and explore generalizations to percolation clusters and random graphs. We show that the classical computational complexity of estimating the ground state of Hamiltonians described by controllable graphs is polynomial in the number of subsystems/qubits.
  • There are various physical scenarios in which one can only implement operations with a certain symmetry. Under such restriction, a system in a symmetry-breaking state can be used as a catalyst, e.g. to prepare another system in a desired symmetry-breaking state. This sort of (approximate) catalytic state transformations are relevant in the context of (i) state preparation using a bounded-size quantum clock or reference frame, where the clock or reference frame acts as a catalyst, (ii) quantum thermodynamics, where again a clock can be used as a catalyst to prepare states which contain coherence with respect to the system Hamiltonian, and (iii) cloning of unknown quantum states, where the given copies of state can be interpreted as a catalyst for preparing the new copies. Using a recent result of Fawzi and Renner on approximate recoverability, we show that the achievable accuracy in this kind of catalytic transformations can be determined by a single function, namely the relative entropy of asymmetry, which is equal to the difference between the entropy of state and its symmetrized version: if the desired state transition does not require a large increase of this quantity, then it can be implemented with high fidelity using only symmetric operations. Our lower bound on the achievable fidelity is tight in the case of cloners, and can be achieved using the Petz recovery map, which interestingly turns out to be the optimal cloning map found by Werner.
  • The method of decoherent histories allows probabilities to be assigned to sequences of quantum events in systems, such as the universe as a whole, where there is no external observer to make measurements. This paper applies the method of decoherent histories to address cosmological questions. Using a series of simple examples, beginning with the harmonic oscillator, we show that systems in a stationary state such as an energy eigenstate or thermal state can exhibit decoherent histories with non-trivial dynamics. We then examine decoherent histories in a universe that undergoes eternal inflation. Decoherent histories that assign probabilities to sequences of events in the vicinity of a timelike geodesic supply a natural cosmological measure. Under reasonable conditions, such sequences of events do not suffer from the presence of unlikely statistical fluctuations that mimic reality.
  • Claude Shannon proved in 1949 that information-theoretic-secure encryption is possible if the encryption key is used only once, is random, and is at least as long as the message itself. Notwithstanding, when information is encoded in a quantum system, the phenomenon of quantum data locking allows one to encrypt a message with a shorter key and still provide information-theoretic security. We present one of the first feasible experimental demonstrations of quantum data locking for direct communication and propose a scheme for a quantum enigma machine that encrypts 6 bits per photon (containing messages, new encryption keys, and forward error correction bits) with less than 6 bits per photon of encryption key while remaining information-theoretically secure.
  • In this work, we present a method to exponentiate non-sparse indefinite low-rank matrices on a quantum computer. Given an operation for accessing the elements of the matrix, our method allows singular values and associated singular vectors to be found quantum mechanically in a time exponentially faster in the dimension of the matrix than known classical algorithms. The method extends to non-Hermitian and non-square matrices via embedding matrices. In the context of the generic singular value decomposition of a matrix, we discuss the Procrustes problem of finding a closest isometry to a given matrix.
  • The passive states of a quantum system minimize the average energy among all the states with a given spectrum. We prove that passive states are the optimal inputs of single-jump lossy quantum channels. These channels arise from a weak interaction of the quantum system of interest with a large Markovian bath in its ground state, such that the interaction Hamiltonian couples only consecutive energy eigenstates of the system. We prove that the output generated by any input state $\rho$ majorizes the output generated by the passive input state $\rho_0$ with the same spectrum of $\rho$. Then, the output generated by $\rho$ can be obtained applying a random unitary operation to the output generated by $\rho_0$. This is an extension of De Palma et al., IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 62, 2895 (2016), where the same result is proved for one-mode bosonic Gaussian channels. We also prove that for finite temperature this optimality property can fail already in a two-level system, where the best input is a coherent superposition of the two energy eigenstates.
  • We propose a quantum algorithm that emulates the action of an unknown unitary transformation on a given input state, using multiple copies of some unknown sample input states of the unitary and their corresponding output states. The algorithm does not assume any prior information about the unitary to be emulated, or the sample input states. To emulate the action of the unknown unitary, the new input state is coupled to the given sample input-output pairs in a coherent fashion. Remarkably, the runtime of the algorithm is logarithmic in D, the dimension of the Hilbert space, and increases polynomially with d, the dimension of the subspace spanned by the sample input states. Furthermore, the sample complexity of the algorithm, i.e. the total number of copies of the sample input-output pairs needed to run the algorithm, is independent of D, and polynomial in d. In contrast, the runtime and the sample complexity of incoherent methods, i.e. methods that use tomography, are both linear in D. The algorithm is blind, in the sense that at the end it does not learn anything about the given samples, or the emulated unitary. This algorithm can be used as a subroutine in other algorithms, such as quantum phase estimation.
  • Although quantum computers are capable of solving problems like factoring exponentially faster than the best-known classical algorithms, determining the resources responsible for their computational power remains unclear. An important class of problems where quantum computers possess an advantage is phase estimation, which includes applications like factoring. We introduce a new computational model based on a single squeezed state resource that can perform phase estimation, which we call the power of one qumode. This model is inspired by an interesting computational model known as deterministic quantum computing with one quantum bit (DQC1). Using the power of one qumode, we identify that the amount of squeezing is sufficient to quantify the resource requirements of different computational problems based on phase estimation. In particular, it establishes a quantitative relationship between the resources required for factoring and DQC1. For example, we find the squeezing required to factor has an exponential scaling whereas no squeezing (i.e., a coherent state) is already sufficient to solve the hardest problem in DQC1.
  • When classical or quantum information is broadcast to separate receivers, there exist codes that encrypt the encoded data such that the receivers cannot recover it when performing local operations and classical communication, but they can decode reliably if they bring their systems together and perform a collective measurement. This phenomenon is known as quantum data hiding and hitherto has been studied under the assumption that noise does not affect the encoded systems. With the aim of applying the quantum data hiding effect in practical scenarios, here we define the data-hiding capacity for hiding classical information using a quantum channel. Using this notion, we establish a regularized upper bound on the data hiding capacity of any quantum broadcast channel, and we prove that coherent-state encodings have a strong limitation on their data hiding rates. We then prove a lower bound on the data hiding capacity of channels that map the maximally mixed state to the maximally mixed state (we call these channels "mictodiactic"---they can be seen as a generalization of unital channels when the input and output spaces are not necessarily isomorphic) and argue how to extend this bound to generic channels and to more than two receivers.
  • Given its importance to many other areas of physics, from condensed matter physics to thermodynamics, time-reversal symmetry has had relatively little influence on quantum information science. Here we develop a network-based picture of time-reversal theory, classifying Hamiltonians and quantum circuits as time-symmetric or not in terms of the elements and geometries of their underlying networks. Many of the typical circuits of quantum information science are found to exhibit time-asymmetry. Moreover, we show that time-asymmetry in circuits can be controlled using local gates only, and can simulate time-asymmetry in Hamiltonian evolution. We experimentally implement a fundamental example in which controlled time-reversal asymmetry in a palindromic quantum circuit leads to near-perfect transport. Our results pave the way for using time-symmetry breaking to control coherent transport, and imply that time-asymmetry represents an omnipresent yet poorly understood effect in quantum information science.
  • Assessing the role of interference in natural and artificial quantum dyanamical processes is a crucial task in quantum information theory. To this aim, an appopriate formalism is provided by the decoherent histories framework. While this approach has been deeply explored from different theoretical perspectives, it still lacks of a comprehensive set of tools able to concisely quantify the amount of coherence developed by a given dynamics. In this paper we introduce and test different measures of the (average) coherence present in dissipative (Markovian) quantum evolutions, at various time scales and for different levels of environmentally induced decoherence. In order to show the effectiveness of the introduced tools, we apply them to a paradigmatic quantum process where the role of coherence is being hotly debated: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes. To spot out the essential features that may determine the performance of the transport we focus on a relevant trimeric subunit of the FMO complex and we use a simplified (Haken-Strobl) model for the system-bath interaction. Our analysis illustrates how the high efficiency of environmentally assisted transport can be traced back to a quantum recoil avoiding effect on the exciton dynamics, that preserves and sustains the benefits of the initial fast quantum delocalization of the exciton over the network. Indeed, for intermediate levels of decoherence, the bath is seen to selectively kill the negative interference between different exciton pathways, while retaining the initial positive one. The concepts and tools here developed show how the decoherent histories approach can be used to quantify the relation between coherence and efficiency in quantum dynamical processes.