• Experimental evidence on high-Tc cuprates reveals ubiquitous charge density wave (CDW) modulations, which coexist with superconductivity. Although the CDW had been predicted by theory, important questions remain about the extent to which the CDW influences lattice and charge degrees of freedom and its characteristics as functions of doping and temperature. These questions are intimately connected to the origin of the CDW and its relation to the mysterious cuprate pseudogap. Here, we use ultrahigh resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) to reveal new CDW character in underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} (Bi2212). At low temperature, we observe dispersive excitations from an incommensurate CDW that induces anomalously enhanced phonon intensity, unseen using other techniques. Near the pseudogap temperature T*, the CDW persists, but the associated excitations significantly weaken and the CDW wavevector shifts, becoming nearly commensurate with a periodicity of four lattice constants. The dispersive CDW excitations, phonon anomaly, and temperature dependent commensuration provide a comprehensive momentum space picture of complex CDW behavior and point to a closer relationship with the pseudogap state.
  • In order to establish the doping dependence of the critical current properties in the iron-based superconductors, the in-plane critical current density (Jc) of BaFe2As2-based superconductors, Ba1-xKxFe2As2 (K-Ba122), Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 (Co-Ba122), and BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 (P-Ba122) in a wide range of doping concentration (x) was investigated by means of magnetization hysteresis loop (MHL) measurements on single-crystal samples. Depending on the dopant elements and their concentration, Jc exhibits a variety of magnetic-field (H) and temperature (T) dependences. (1) In the case of K-Ba122, MHL of the underdoped samples (x < 0.33) exhibits the second magnetization peak (SMP), which sustains high Jc at high H and high T, exceeding 10^5 A/cm2 at T = 25 K and H = 6 T for x = 0.30. On the other hand, SMP is missing in the optimally (x ~ 0.36-0.40) and overdoped (x ~ 0.50) samples, and consequently Jc rapidly decreases by more than one order of magnitude, although the change in Tc is within a few K. (2) For Co-Ba122, SMP is always present over the entire superconducting (SC) dome from the under (x ~ 0.05) to the overdoped (x ~ 0.12) region. However, the magnitude of Jc significantly changes with x, exhibiting a sharp maximum at x ~ 0.057, which is a slightly underdoped composition for Co-Ba122. (3) For P-Ba122, the highest Jc is attained at x = 0.30 corresponding to the highest Tc composition. For the overdoped samples, MHL is characterized by SMP located close to the irreversibility field. Common to the three doping variations, Jc becomes highest at the under-doping side of SC dome near the phase boundary between SC phase and the antiferromagnetic/orthorhombic phase. Also, the peak appears in a narrow range of doping, distinct from the Tc dome with broad maximum. These similarities in the three cases indicate that the observed doping dependence of Jc is intrinsic to the BaFe2As2-based superconductors.
  • In the high-temperature ($T_{c}$) cuprate superconductors, increasing evidence suggests that the pseudogap, existing below the pseudogap temperature $T$*, has a distinct broken electronic symmetry from that of superconductivity. Particularly, recent scattering experiments on the underdoped cuprates have suggested that a charge ordering competes with superconductivity. However, no direct link of this physics and the important low-energy excitations has been identified. Here we report an antagonistic singularity at $T_{c}$ in the spectral weight of Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+{\delta}}$ as a compelling evidence for phase competition, which persists up to a high hole concentration $p$ ~ 0.22. Comparison with a theoretical calculation confirms that the singularity is a signature of competition between the order parameters for the pseudogap and superconductivity. The observation of the spectroscopic singularity at finite temperatures over a wide doping range provides new insights into the nature of the competitive interplay between the two intertwined phases and the complex phase diagram near the pseudogap critical point.
  • We report measurements of ac magnetic susceptibility $\chi_{ac}$ and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) oscillations in KFe$_2$As$_2$ under high pressure up to 24.7 kbar. The pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature $T_c$ changes from negative to positive across $P_c \sim 18$ kbar as previously reported. The ratio of the upper critical field to $T_c$, i.e, $B_{c2} / T_c$, is enhanced above $P_c$, and the shape of $\chi_{ac}$ vs field curves qualitatively changes across $P_c$. DHvA oscillations smoothly evolve across $P_c$ and indicate no drastic change in the Fermi surface up to 24.7 kbar. Three dimensionality increases with pressure, while effective masses show decreasing trends. We suggest a crossover from a nodal to a full-gap $s$ wave as a possible explanation.
  • Synthesis of a series of layered iron arsenides Ca1-xRExFeAs2 (112) was attempted by heating at 1000 C under a high-pressure of 2 GPa. The 112 phase successfully forms with RE = La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd, while Tb, Dy and Ho substituted and RE free samples does not contain the 112 phase. The Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd doped Ca1-xRExFeAs2 are new compounds. All of them exhibit superconducting transition except for the Ce doped sample. The behaviour of the critical temperature, with the RE ionic radii have been investigated.
  • We have observed hysteresis in superconducting resistive transition curves of Ba$_{0.07}$K$_{0.93}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ ($T_c\sim$8 K) below about 1 K for in-plane fields. The hysteresis is not observed as the field is tilted away from the $ab$ plane by 20$^{\circ}$ or more. The temperature and angle dependences of the upper critical field indicate a strong paramagnetic effect for in-plane fields. We suggest that the hysteresis can be attributed to a first-order superconducting transition due to the paramagnetic effect. Magnetic torque data are also shown.
  • In order to unravel a role of doping in the iron-based superconductors, we investigated the in-plane resistivity for BaFe$_2$As$_2$ doped at either of the three different lattice sites, Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_x$)$_2$As$_2$, BaFe$_2$(As$_{1-x}$P$_x$)$_2$, and Ba$_{1-x}$K$_x$Fe$_2$As$_2$, focusing on the doping effect in the low-temperature antiferromagnetic/orthorhombic (AFO) phase. A major role of doping in the high-temperature paramagnetic/tetragonal (PT) phase is known to change the Fermi surface by supplying charge carriers or by exerting chemical pressure. In the AFO phase, we found a clear correlation between the magnitude of residual resistivity and resistivity anisotropy. This indicates that the resistivity anisotropy originates from the anisotropic impurity scattering from dopant atoms. The magnitude of residual resistivity is also found to be a parameter controlling the suppression rate of AFO ordering temperature $T_s$. Therefore, the dominant role of doping in the AFO phase is to introduce disorder to the system, distinct from that in the PT phase.
  • We show that the Fermi surface (FS) in the antiferromagnetic phase of BaFe$_2$As$_2$ is composed of one hole and two electron pockets, all of which are three dimensional and closed, in sharp contrast to the FS observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Considerations on the carrier compensation and Sommerfeld coefficient rule out existence of unobserved FS pockets of significant sizes. A standard band structure calculation reasonably accounts for the observed FS, despite the overestimated ordered moment. The mass enhancement, the ratio of the effective mass to the band mass, is 2--3.
  • Centimeter sized platelet single crystals of KFe2As2 were grown using a self-flux method. An encapsulation technique using commercial stainless steel container allowed the stable crystal growth lasting for more than 2 weeks. Ternary K-Fe-As systems with various starting compositions were examined to determine the optimal growth conditions. Employment of KAs flux led to the growth of large single crystals with the typical size of as large as 15 mm x 10 mm x 0.4 mm. The grown crystals exhibit sharp superconducting transition at 3.4 K with the transition width 0.2 K, as well as the very large residual resistivity ratio exceeding 450, evidencing the good sample quality.