• We make a first attempt to find dwarf galaxies in eight \Fermi-LAT extended, unassociated, source fields using \Gaia\ DR2. We probe previously unexplored heliocentric distances of $d<20$~kpc with an extreme-deconvolution (XD) technique. We find no signature of a dwarf galaxy in any of these fields despite \Gaia's excellent astrometric accuracy. We estimate our detection limits by applying the XD method to mock data, obtaining a conservative limit on the stellar mass of $M_* < 10^4$~M$_{\sun}$ for $d < 20$\, kpc. Such a low stellar mass implies either a low-mass subhalo, or a massive stripped-down subhalo. We use an analytic model for stripped subhalos to argue that, given the sizes and fluxes of the \Fermi-LAT sources, we can reject the hypothesis that they owe to dark matter annihilation.
  • We present a first joint analysis of the power spectra of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect measured by the Planck and the number density fluctuations of galaxies in the 2MASS redshift survey (2MRS) catalog, including their cross-correlation. Combining these measurements with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and CMB lensing of Planck assuming a flat $\Lambda$CDM model, we constrain the mass bias parameter as $B = 1.54 \pm 0.098 (1\sigma)$ [$(1-b) = 0.649 \pm 0.041$, where $(1-b) \equiv B^{-1}$], i.e., the Planck cluster mass should be $35\%$ lower than the true mass. The mass bias determined by the 2MRS-tSZ cross-power spectrum alone is consistent with that determined by the tSZ auto-power spectrum alone, suggesting that this large mass bias is not due to obvious systematics in the tSZ data. We find that the 2MRS-tSZ cross-power spectrum is more sensitive to less massive halos than the tSZ auto-power spectrum and it significantly improves a constraint on the mass dependence of the mass bias. The redshift dependence is not strongly constrained since the multipole range in which high redshift clusters mainly contribute to the tSZ auto is dominated by the contaminating sources. We conclude that no strong mass or redshift evolution of the mass bias is needed to explain the data.
  • We study evolution of dark matter substructures, especially how they lose the mass and change density profile after they fall in gravitational potential of larger host halos. We develop an analytical prescription that models the subhalo mass evolution and calibrate it to results of N-body numerical simulations of various scales from very small (Earth size) to large (galaxies to clusters) halos. We then combine the results with halo accretion histories, and calculate the subhalo mass function that is physically motivated down to Earth-mass scales. Our results --- valid for arbitrary host masses and redshifts --- show reasonable agreement with those of numerical simulations at resolved scales. Our analytical model also enables self-consistent calculations of the boost factor of dark matter annhilation, which we find to increase from tens of percent at the smallest (Earth) and intermediate (dwarfs) masses to a factor of several at galaxy size, and to become as large as a factor of $\sim$10 for the largest halos (clusters) at small redshifts. Our analytical approach can accommodate substructures in the subhalos (sub-subhalos) in a consistent framework, which we find to give up to a factor of a few enhancement to the annihilation boost. Presence of the subhalos enhances the intensity of the isotropic gamma-ray background by a factor of a few, and as the result, the measurement by Fermi Large Area Telescope excludes the annihilation cross section greater than $\sim$$4\times 10^{-26}$ cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$ for dark matter masses up to $\sim$200 GeV.
  • We investigate the radiative decay of the cosmic neutrino background, and its impact on the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) that is known to be a nearly perfect black body. We derive exact formulae for the decay of a heavier neutrino into a lighter neutrino and a photon, $\nu_j \to \nu_i + \gamma$, and of absorption as its inverse, $\nu_i + \gamma \to \nu_j$, by accounting for the precise form of the neutrino momentum distribution. Our calculations show that if the neutrinos are heavier than $\mathcal O(0.1)$ eV, the exact formulae give results that differ by $\sim$50%, compared with approximate ones where neutrinos are assumed to be at rest. We also find that spectral distortion due to absorption is more important for heavy neutrino masses (by a factor of $\sim$10 going from a neutrino mass of 0.01 eV to 0.1 eV). By analyzing the CMB spectral data measured with COBE-FIRAS, we obtain lower limits on the neutrino lifetime of $\tau_{12} \gtrsim 4 \times 10^{21}$ s (95% C.L.) for the smaller mass splitting and $\tau_{13} \sim \tau_{23} \gtrsim 10^{19}$ s for the larger mass splitting. These represent up to one order of magnitude improvement over previous CMB constraints. With future CMB experiments such as PIXIE, these limits will improve by roughly 4 orders of magnitude. This translates to a projected upper limit on the neutrino magnetic moment (for certain neutrino masses and decay modes) of $\mu_\nu < 3 \times 10^{-11}\, \mu_B$, where $\mu_B$ is the Bohr magneton. Such constraints would make future precision CMB measurements competitive with lab-based constraints on neutrino magnetic moments.
  • We present the first individual and stacking systematic search for $\gamma$-ray emission in the GeV band with the {\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT), in the directions of 45 super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe). No excess of \gam rays from the SLSN positions was found. We report $\gamma$-ray luminosity upper limits and discuss the implication of these results on the origin of SLSNe in particular on the scenario of central compact object-aided SNe. From the stacking search, we derive an upper limit at 95\% confidence level (CL) to the $\gamma$-ray luminosity (above 600 MeV) $L_{\gamma}<9.1\times10^{41}$\,erg\,s$^{-1}$ for an assumed $E^{-2}$ photon spectrum, for our full SLSN sample. We conclude that the rate of the neutron stars born with millisecond rotation periods {$P\lesssim 2\,$ms and $B\sim10^{12-13}\,$G} must be lower than the rate of the observed SLSNe. The luminosity limits obtained on individual sources are also constraining: in particular, SN2013fc, CSS140222, SN2010kd, and PTF12dam can be born with millisecond periods only if $B\lesssim 10^{13}\,$G.
  • If dark energy (DE) is a dynamical field rather than a cosmological constant, an interaction between DE and the neutrino sector could exist, modifying the neutrino oscillation phenomenology and causing CP and apparent Lorentz violating effects. The terms in the Hamiltonian for flavor propagation induced by the DE-neutrino coupling do not depend on the neutrino energy, while the ordinary components decrease as $\Delta m^2/E_{\nu}$. Therefore, the DE-induced effects are absent at lower neutrino energies, but become significant at higher energies, allowing to be searched for by neutrino observatories. We explore the impact of the DE-neutrino coupling on the oscillation probability and the flavor transition in the three-flavor framework, and investigate the CP-violating and apparent Lorentz violating effects. We find that DE-induced effects become observable for $E_{\nu}m_{\text{eff}} \sim 10^{-20}~ \text{GeV}^2$, where $m_{\rm eff}$ is the effective mass parameter in the DE-induced oscillation probability, and CP is violated over a wide energy range. We also show that current and future experiments have the sensitivity to detect anomalous effects induced by a DE-neutrino coupling and probe the new mixing parameters. The DE-induced effects on neutrino oscillation can be distinguished from other new physics possibilities with similar effects, through the detection of the directional dependence of the interaction, which is specific to this interaction with DE. However, current experiments will not yet be able to measure the small changes of $\sim 0.03\%$ in the flavor composition due to this directional effect.
  • Dwarf spheroidals are low-luminosity satellite galaxies of the Milky Way highly dominated by dark matter (DM). Therefore, they are prime targets to search for signals from dark matter annihilation using gamma-ray observations. While the typical assumption is that the dark matter density profile of these satellite galaxies can be described by a spherical symmetric Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, recent observational data of stellar kinematics suggest that the DM halos around these galaxies are better described by axisymmetric profiles. Motivated by such evidence, we analyse about seven years of PASS8 Fermi data for seven classical dwarf galaxies, including Draco, adopting both the widely used NFW profile and observationally-motivated axisymmetric density profiles. For four of the selected dwarfs (Sextans, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax) axisymmetric mass models suggest a cored density profile rather than the commonly adopted cusped profile. We found that upper limits on the annihilation cross section for some of these dwarfs are significantly higher than the ones achieved using an NFW profile. Therefore, upper limits in the literature obtained using spherical symmetric cusped profiles, such as the NFW, might be overestimated. Our results show that it is extremely important to use observationally motivated density profiles going beyond the usually adopted NFW in order to obtain accurate constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section.
  • We present the measurement and interpretation of the angular power spectrum of nearby galaxies in the 2MASS Redshift Survey catalog with spectroscopic redshifts up to $z\approx 0.1$. We detect the angular power spectrum up to a multipole of $\ell\approx 1000$. We find that the measured power spectrum is dominated by galaxies living inside nearby galaxy clusters and groups. We use the halo occupation distribution (HOD) formalism to model the power spectrum, obtaining a fit with reasonable parameters. These HOD parameters are in agreement with the 2MASS galaxy distribution we measure toward the known nearby galaxy clusters, confirming validity of our analysis.
  • Various particle physics models suggest that, besides the (nearly) cold dark matter that accounts for current observations, additional but sub-dominant dark relics might exist. These could be warm, hot, or even contribute as dark radiation. We present here a comprehensive study of two-component dark matter scenarios, where the first component is assumed to be cold, and the second is a non-cold thermal relic. Considering the cases where the non-cold dark matter species could be either a fermion or a boson, we derive consistent upper limits on the non-cold dark relic energy density for a very large range of velocity dispersions, covering the entire range from dark radiation to cold dark matter. To this end, we employ the latest Planck Cosmic Microwave Background data, the recent BOSS DR11 and other Baryon Acoustic Oscillation measurements, and also constraints on the number of Milky Way satellites, the latter of which provides a measure of the suppression of the matter power spectrum at the smallest scales due to the free-streaming of the non-cold dark matter component. We present the results on the fraction $f_{\rm ncdm}$ of non-cold dark matter with respect to the total dark matter for different ranges of the non-cold dark matter masses. We find that the 2$\sigma$ limits for non-cold dark matter particles with masses in the range 1--10 keV are $f_{\rm ncdm}\leq0.29$ (0.23) for fermions (bosons), and for masses in the 10--100 keV range they are $f_{\rm ncdm}\leq0.43$ (0.45), respectively.
  • After the discovery of extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos, the next major goal of neutrino telescopes will be identifying astrophysical objects that produce them. The flux of the brightest source $F_{\rm max}$, however, cannot be probed by studying the diffuse neutrino intensity. We aim at constraining $F_{\rm max}$ by adopting a broken power-law flux distribution, a hypothesis supported by observed properties of any generic astrophysical sources. The first estimate of $F_{\rm max}$ comes from the fact that we can only observe one universe, and hence, the expected number of sources above $F_{\rm max}$ cannot be too small compared with one. For abundant source classes such as starburst galaxies, this one-source constraint yields a value of $F_{\rm max}$ that is an order of magnitude lower than the current upper limits from point-source searches. Then we derive upper limits on $F_{\rm max}$ assuming that the angular power spectrum is consistent with neutrino shot noise yet. We find that the limits obtained with upgoing muon neutrinos in IceCube can already be quite competitive, especially for rare but bright source populations such as blazars. The limits will improve nearly quadratically with exposure, and therefore be even more powerful for the next generation of neutrino telescopes.
  • We perform the first one-point fluctuation analysis of the high-energy neutrino sky. This method reveals itself to be especially suited to contemporary neutrino data, as it allows to study the properties of the astrophysical components of the high-energy flux detected by the IceCube telescope, even with low statistics and in the absence of point source detection. Besides the veto-passing atmospheric foregrounds, we adopt a simple model of the high-energy neutrino background by assuming two main extra-galactic components: star-forming galaxies and blazars. By leveraging multi-wavelength data from Herschel and Fermi, we predict the spectral and anisotropic probability distributions for their expected neutrino counts in IceCube. We find that star-forming galaxies are likely to remain a diffuse background due to the poor angular resolution of IceCube, and we determine an upper limit on the number of shower events that can reasonably be associated to blazars. We also find that upper limits on the contribution of blazars to the measured flux are unfavourably affected by the skewness of the blazar flux distribution. One-point event clustering and likelihood analyses of the IceCube HESE data suggest that this method has the potential to dramatically improve over more conventional model-based analyses, especially for the next generation of neutrino telescopes.
  • We measure the cross-correlation between Fermi-LAT gamma-ray photons and over 1000 deg$^2$ of weak lensing data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), the Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), and the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). We present the first measurement of tomographic weak lensing cross-correlations and the first application of spectral binning to cross-correlations between gamma rays and weak lensing. The measurements are performed using an angular power spectrum estimator while the covariance is estimated using an analytical prescription. We verify the accuracy of our covariance estimate by comparing it to two internal covariance estimators. Based on the non-detection of a cross-correlation signal, we derive constraints on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. We compute exclusion limits on the dark matter annihilation cross-section $\langle\sigma_\rm{ann} v \rangle$, decay rate $\Gamma_\rm{dec}$, and particle mass $m_\rm{DM}$. We find that in the absence of a cross-correlation signal, tomography does not significantly improve the constraining power of the analysis. Assuming a strong contribution to the gamma-ray flux due to small-scale clustering of dark matter and accounting for known astrophysical sources of gamma rays, we exclude the thermal relic cross-section for particle masses of $m_\rm{DM}\lesssim 20$ GeV.
  • Recently, a new measurement of the auto- and cross-correlation angular power spectrum (APS) of the isotropic gamma-ray background was performed, based on 81 months of data of the Fermi Large-Area Telescope (LAT). Here, we fit, for the first time, the new APS data with a model describing the emission of unresolved blazars. These sources are expected to dominate the anisotropy signal. The model we employ in our analysis reproduces well the blazars resolved by Fermi LAT. When considering the APS obtained by masking the sources in the 3FGL catalogue, we find that unresolved blazars under-produce the measured APS below $\sim$1 GeV. Contrary to past results, this suggests the presence of a new contribution to the low-energy APS, with a significance of, at least, 5$\sigma$. The excess can be ascribed to a new class of faint gamma-ray emitters. If we consider the APS obtained by masking the sources in the 2FGL catalogue, there is no under-production of the APS below 1 GeV, but the new source class is still preferred over the blazars-only scenario (with a significance larger than 10$\sigma$). The properties of the new source class and the level of anisotropies induced in the isotropic gamma-ray background are the same, independent of the APS data used. In particular, the new gamma-ray emitters must have a soft energy spectrum, with a spectral index ranging, approximately, from 2.7 to 3.2. This complicates their interpretation in terms of known sources, since, normally, star-forming and radio galaxies are observed with a harder spectrum. The new source class identified here is also expected to contribute significantly to the intensity of the isotropic gamma-ray background.
  • It has been long discussed that cosmic rays may contain signals of dark matter. In the last couple of years an anomaly of cosmic-ray positrons has drawn a lot of attentions, and recently an excess in cosmic-ray anti-proton has been reported by AMS-02 collaboration. Both excesses may indicate towards decaying or annihilating dark matter with a mass of around 1-10 TeV. In this article we study the gamma rays from dark matter and constraints from cross correlations with distribution of galaxies, particularly in a local volume. We find that gamma rays due to inverse-Compton process have large intensity, and hence they give stringent constraints on dark matter scenarios in the TeV scale mass regime. Taking the recent developments in modeling astrophysical gamma-ray sources as well as comprehensive possibilities of the final state products of dark matter decay or annihilation into account, we show that the parameter regions of decaying dark matter that are suggested to explain the excesses are excluded. We also discuss the constrains on annihilating scenarios.
  • Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been often considered as the natural evolution of some core-collapse supernovae (SNe). While GRBs with relativistic jets emit an electromagnetic signal, GRBs with mildly relativistic jets are opaque to photons and, therefore, could be detectable through neutrinos only. We discuss the possibility that successful GRBs and mildly relativistic jets belong to the same class of astrophysical transients with different Lorentz factor Gamma_b and study the production of high-energy neutrinos as a function of Gamma_b, by including both proton-photon and proton-proton interactions. By assuming a SN-GRB connection, we find that the diffuse neutrino emission from optically thick jets with Lorentz factors lower than the ones of successful GRBs can be one of the main components of the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux. Moreover, under the assumption that all these jets belong to the same class of astrophysical transients, we show that the IceCube high-energy neutrino data provide indirect constraints on the rate of non-successful jets, favoring a local rate lower than tens of percent of the local SN rate. These limits are currently comparable to the ones obtained in dedicated searches on choked sources and are expected to become tighter with accumulation of more high-energy neutrino data.
  • Mounting evidence suggests that the TeV-PeV neutrino flux detected by the IceCube telescope has mainly an extragalactic origin. If such neutrinos are primarily produced by a single class of astrophysical sources via hadronuclear ($pp$) interactions, a similar flux of gamma-ray photons is expected. For the first time, we employ tomographic constraints to pinpoint the origin of the IceCube neutrino events by analyzing recent measurements of the cross correlation between the distribution of GeV gamma rays, detected by the Fermi satellite, and several galaxy catalogs in different redshift ranges. We find that the corresponding bounds on the neutrino luminosity density are up to one order of magnitude tighter than those obtained by using only the spectrum of the gamma-ray background, especially for sources with mild redshift evolution. In particular, our method excludes any hadronuclear source with a spectrum softer than $E^{-2.1}$ as a main component of the neutrino background, if its evolution is slower than $(1+z)^3$. Starburst galaxies, if able to accelerate and confine cosmic rays efficiently, satisfy both spectral and tomographic constraints.
  • In the cold dark matter paradigm, structures form hierarchically, implying that large structures contain smaller substructures. These subhalos will enhance signatures of dark matter annihilation such as gamma rays. In the literature, typical estimates of this boost factor assume a concentration-mass relation for field halos, to calculate the luminosity of subhalos. However, since subhalos accreted in the gravitational potential of their host loose mass through tidal stripping and dynamical friction, they have a quite characteristic density profile, different from that of the field halos of the same mass. In this work, we quantify the effect of tidal stripping on the boost factor, by developing a semi-analytic model that combines mass-accretion history of both the host and subhalos as well as subhalo accretion rates. We find that when subhalo luminosities are treated consistently, the boost factor increases by a factor 2-5, compared to the typical calculation assuming a field-halo concentration. This holds for host halos ranging from sub-galaxy to cluster masses and is independent of the subhalo mass function or specific concentration-mass relation. The results are particularly relevant for indirect dark matter searches in the extragalactic gamma-ray sky.
  • We investigate the prospects of indirect and direct dark matter searches within the minimal supersymmetric standard model with nine parameters (MSSM-9). These nine parameters include three gaugino masses, Higgs, slepton and squark masses, all treated independently. We perform a Bayesian Monte Carlo scan of the parameter space taking into consideration all available particle physics constraints such as the Higgs mass of 126 GeV, upper limits on the scattering cross-section from direct-detection experiments, and assuming that the MSSM-9 provides all the dark matter abundance through thermal freeze-out mechanism. Within this framework we find two most probable regions for dark matter: 1-TeV higgsino-like and 3-TeV wino-like neutralinos. We discuss prospects for future indirect (in particular the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA) and direct detection experiments. We find that for slightly contracted dark matter profiles in our Galaxy, which can be caused by the effects of baryonic infall in the Galactic center, CTA will be able to probe a large fraction of the remaining allowed region in synergy with future direct detection experiments like XENON-1T.
  • We study how the kinetic decoupling of dark matter (DM) within a minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model, by adopting nine independent parameters (MSSM-9), could improve our knowledge of the properties of the DM protohalos. We show that the most probable neutralino mass regions, which satisfy the relic density and the Higgs mass contraints, are those with the lightest supersymmetric neutralino mass around 1 TeV and 3 TeV, corresponding to Higgsino-like and Wino-like neutralino, respectively. The kinetic decoupling temperature in the MSSM-9 scenario leads to a most probable protohalo mass in a range of $M_{\mathrm{ph}}\sim 10^{-12}-10^{-7}\,M_\odot$. The part of the region closer to 2 TeV gives also important contributions from the neutralino-stau co-annihilation, reducing the effective annihilation rate in the early Universe. We also study how the size of the smallest DM substructures correlates to experimental signatures, such as the spin-dependent and spin-independent scattering cross sections, relevant for direct detection of DM. Improvements on the spin-independent sensitivity might reduce the most probable range of the protohalo mass between $\sim$10$^{-9}\,M_\odot$ and $\sim$10$^{-7}\,M_\odot$, while the expected spin-dependent sensitivity provides weaker constraints. We show how the boost of the luminosity due to DM annihilation increases, depending on the protohalo mass. In the Higgsino case, the protohalo mass is lower than the canonical value often used in the literature ($\sim$10$^{-6}\,M_\odot$), while $\langle\sigma v\rangle$ does not deviate from $\langle\sigma v\rangle\sim 10^{-26}$ cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$; there is no significant enhancement of the luminosity. On the contrary, in the Wino case, the protohalo mass is even lighter, and $\langle\sigma v\rangle$ is two orders of magnitude larger; as its consequence, we see a substantial enhancement of the luminosity.
  • We investigate for the first time the potential of angular auto- and cross-correlation power spectra in identifying sterile neutrino dark matter in the cosmic X-ray background. We take as reference the performance of the soon-to-be-launched eROSITA satellite. The main astrophysical background sources against sterile neutrino decays are active galactic nuclei, galaxies powered by X-ray binaries, and clusters of galaxies. While sterile neutrino decays are always subdominant in the auto-correlation power spectra, they can be efficiently enhanced when cross-correlating with tracers of the dark matter distribution such as galaxies in the 2MASS catalogues. We show that the planned four-years eROSITA all-sky survey will provide a large enough photon statistics to potentially yield very stringent constraints on the decay lifetime, enabling to firmly test the recently claimed 3.56-keV X-ray line found towards several clusters and galaxies and its decaying dark matter interpretation. However, we also show that in order to fully exploit the potential of eROSITA for dark matter searches, it is vital to overcome the shot-noise limitations inherent to galaxy catalogues as tracers for the dark matter distribution.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays, assuming that the leading mechanism for the neutrino production is lepto-hadronic. To this purpose, we include hadronic, radiative and adiabatic cooling effects and discuss their relevance for long- (including high- and low-luminosity) and short-duration GRBs. The expected diffuse neutrino background is derived, by requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions of the long and short GRBs. Although dedicated stacking searches have been unsuccessful up to now, we find that GRBs could contribute up to a few % to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, assuming that the latter has a diffuse origin. Gamma-ray bursts, especially low-luminosity ones, could however be the main sources of the IceCube high-energy neutrino flux in the PeV range. While high-luminosity and low-luminosity GRBs have comparable intensities, the contribution from the short-duration component is significantly smaller. Our findings confirm the most-recent IceCube results on the GRB searches and suggest that larger exposure is mandatory to detect high-energy neutrinos from high-luminosity GRBs in the near future.
  • The one-point function (i.e., the isotropic flux distribution) is a complementary method to (anisotropic) two-point correlations in searches for a gamma-ray dark matter annihilation signature. Using analytical models of structure formation and dark matter halo properties, we compute the gamma-ray flux distribution due to annihilations in extragalactic dark matter halos, as it would be observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Combining the central limit theorem and Monte Carlo sampling, we show that the flux distribution takes the form of a narrow Gaussian of `diffuse' light, with an `unresolved point source' power-law tail as a result of bright halos. We argue that this background due to dark matter constitutes an irreducible and significant background component for point-source annihilation searches with galaxy clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies, modifying the predicted signal-to-noise ratio. A study of astrophysical backgrounds to this signal reveals that the shape of the total gamma-ray flux distribution is very sensitive to the contribution of a dark matter component, allowing us to forecast promising one-point upper limits on the annihilation cross section. We show that by using the flux distribution at only one energy bin, one can probe the canonical cross section required for explaining the relic density, for dark matter of masses around tens of GeV.
  • The intra-cluster medium of several galaxy clusters hosts large-scale regions of diffuse synchrotron radio emission, known as radio halos and relics, which demonstrate the presence of magnetic fields and relativistic electrons in clusters. These relativistic electrons should also emit X-rays through inverse-Compton scattering off of cosmic microwave background photons. The detection of such a non-thermal X-ray component, together with the radio measurement, would permit to clearly separate the magnetic field from the relativistic electron distribution as the inverse-Compton emission is independent from the magnetic field in the cluster. However, non-thermal X-rays have not been conclusively detected from any cluster of galaxies so far. In this paper, for the first time, we model the synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission of all clusters hosting radio halos and relics for which the spectral index can be determined. We provide constraints on the volume-average magnetic field by comparing with current X-ray measurements. We then estimate the maximum volume-average magnetic field that will allow the detection of inverse-Compton hard X-rays by the ASTRO-H satellite. We found that several clusters are good targets for ASTRO-H to detect their inverse-Compton emission, in particular that corresponding to radio relics, and propose a list of promising targets for which ASTRO-H can test $\ge1$~$\mu$G magnetic fields. We conclude that future hard X-ray observations by the already-operating NuSTAR and the soon-to-be-launched ASTRO-H definitely have the potential to shed light on the long-sought non-thermal hard-X-ray emission in clusters of galaxies.
  • If dark matter is unstable and the mass is within GeV-TeV regime, its decays produce high-energy photons that give contribution to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB). We constrain dark matter decay by analyzing the 50-month EGRB data measured with Fermi satellite, for different decay channels motivated with several supersymmetric scenarios featuring R-parity violation. We adopt the latest astrophysical models for various source classes such as active galactic nuclei and star-forming galaxies, and take associated uncertainties properly into account. The lower limits for the lifetime are very stringent for a wide range of dark matter mass, excluding the lifetime shorter than 10^28 s for mass between a few hundred GeV and ~1TeV, e.g., for b\bar{b} decay channel. Furthermore, most dark matter models that explain the anomalous positron excess are also excluded. These constraints are robust, being little dependent on astrophysical uncertainties, unlike other probes such as Galactic positrons or anti-protons.
  • Cross-correlating the gamma-ray background with local galaxy catalogs potentially gives stringent constraints on dark matter annihilation. We provide updated theoretical estimates of sensitivities to the annihilation cross section from gamma-ray data with Fermi telescope and 2MASS galaxy catalogs, by elaborating the galaxy power spectrum and astrophysical backgrounds, and adopting the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, we show that taking tomographic approach by dividing the galaxy catalogs into more than one redshift slice will improve the sensitivity by a factor of a few to several. If dark matter halos contain lots of bright substructures, yielding a large annihilation boost (e.g., a factor of $\sim$100 for galaxy-size halos), then one may be able to probe the canonical annihilation cross section for thermal production mechanism up to masses of $\sim$700 GeV. Even with modest substructure boost (e.g., a factor of $\sim$10 for galaxy-size halos), on the other hand, the sensitivities could still reach a factor of three larger than the canonical cross section for dark matter masses of tens to a few hundreds of GeV.