• Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves, spectacular horizontally propagating disturbances in the low solar corona, always trigger horizontal secondary waves (SWs) when they encounter ambient coronal structure. We present a first example of upward SWs in a streamer-like structure after the passing of an EUV wave. The event occurred on 2017 June 1. The EUV wave happened during a typical solar eruption including a filament eruption, a CME, a C6.6 flare. The EUV wave was associated with quasi-periodic fast propagating (QFP) wave trains and a type II radio burst that represented the existence of a coronal shock. The EUV wave had a fast initial velocity of $\sim$1000 km s$^{-1}$, comparable to high speeds of the shock and the QFP wave trains. Intriguingly, upward SWs rose slowly ($\sim$80 km s$^{-1}$) in the streamer-like structure after the sweeping of the EUV wave. The upward SWs seemed to originate from limb brightenings that were caused by the EUV wave. All the results show the EUV wave is a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic shock wave, likely triggered by the flare impulses. We suggest that part of the EUV wave was probably trapped in the closed magnetic fields of streamer-like structure, and upward SWs possibly resulted from the release of trapped waves in the form of slow-mode. It is believed that an interplay of the strong compression of the coronal shock and the configuration of the streamer-like structure is crucial for the formation of upward SWs.
  • This paper presents the latest observations from the newly-built solar radio spectrograph at the \emph{Chashan Solar Observatory}. On July 18 2016, the spectrograph records a solar spike burst event, which has several episodes showing harmonic structures, with the second, third, and fourth harmonics. The lower harmonic radio spike emissions are observed later than the higher harmonic bands, and the temporal delay of the second (third) harmonic relative to the fourth harmonic is about 30\ --\ 40 (10) ms. Based on the electron cyclotron maser emission mechanism, we analyze possible causes of the temporal delay and further infer relevant coronal parameters, such as the magnetic field strength and the electron density at the radio source.
  • Type-I bursts (i.e. noise storms) are the earliest-known type of solar radio emission at the metre wavelength. They are believed to be excited by non-thermal energetic electrons accelerated in the corona. The underlying dynamic process and exact emission mechanism still remain unresolved. Here, with a combined analysis of extreme ultraviolet (EUV), radio and photospheric magnetic field data of unprecedented quality recorded during a type-I storm on 30 July 2011, we identify a good correlation between the radio bursts and the co-spatial EUV and magnetic activities. The EUV activities manifest themselves as three major brightening stripes above a region adjacent to a compact sunspot, while the magnetic field there presents multiple moving magnetic features (MMFs) with persistent coalescence or cancelation and a morphologically similar three-part distribution. We find that the type-I intensities are correlated with those of the EUV emissions at various wavelengths with a correlation coefficient of 0.7-0.8. In addition, in the region between the brightening EUV stripes and the radio sources there appear consistent dynamic motions with a series of bi-directional flows, suggesting ongoing small-scale reconnection there. Mainly based on the induced connection between the magnetic motion at the photosphere and the EUV and radio activities in the corona, we suggest that the observed type-I noise storms and the EUV brightening activities are the consequence of small-scale magnetic reconnection driven by MMFs. This is in support of the original proposal made by Bentely et al. (Solar Phys. 193, 227, 2000).
  • Hot channel (HC) structure, observed in the high-temperature passbands of the AIA/SDO, is regarded as one candidate of coronal flux rope which is an essential element of solar eruptions. Here we present the first radio imaging study of an HC structure in the metric wavelength. The associated radio emission manifests as a moving type-IV (t-IVm) burst. We show that the radio sources co-move outwards with the HC, indicating that the t-IV emitting energetic electrons are efficiently trapped within the structure. The t-IV sources at different frequencies present no considerable spatial dispersion during the early stage of the event, while the sources spread gradually along the eruptive HC structure at later stage with significant spatial dispersion. The t-IV bursts are characterized by a relatively-high brightness temperature ($\sim$ 10$^{7}$ $-$ 10$^{9}$ K), a moderate polarization, and a spectral shape that evolves considerably with time. This study demonstrates the possibility of imaging the eruptive HC structure at the metric wavelength and provides strong constraints on the t-IV emision mechanism, which, if understood, can be used to diagnose the essential parameters of the eruptive structure.
  • Type III and type-III-like radio bursts are produced by energetic electron beams guided along coronal magnetic fields. As a variant of type III bursts, Type N bursts appear as the letter "N" in the radio dynamic spectrum and reveal a magnetic mirror effect in coronal loops. Here, we report a well-observed N-shaped burst consisting of three successive branches at metric wavelength with both fundamental and harmonic components and a high brightness temperature ($>$10$^9$ K). We verify the burst as a true type N burst generated by the same electron beam from three aspects of the data. First, durations of the three branches at a given frequency increase gradually, may due to the dispersion of the beam along its path. Second, the flare site, as the only possible source of non-thermal electrons, is near the western feet of large-scale closed loops. Third, the first branch and the following two branches are localized at different legs of the loops with opposite sense of polarization. We also find that the sense of polarization of the radio burst is in contradiction to the O-mode and there exists a fairly large time delay ($\sim$3-5 s) between the fundamental and harmonic components. Possible explanations accounting for these observations are presented. Assuming the classical plasma emission mechanism, we can infer coronal parameters such as electron density and magnetic field near the radio source and make diagnostics on the magnetic mirror process.
  • First-of-its-kind radio imaging of decameter solar stationary type IV radio burst has been presented in this paper. On 6 September 2014 the observations of type IV burst radio emission have been carried out with the two-dimensional heliograph based on the Ukrainian T-shaped radio telescope (UTR-2) together with other telescope arrays. Starting at 09:55 UT and throughout 3 hours, the radio emission was kept within the observational session of UTR-2. The interesting observation covered the full evolution of this burst, "from birth to death". During the event lifetime, two C-class solar X-ray flares with peak times 11:29 UT and 12:24 UT took place. The time profile of this burst in radio has a double-humped shape that can be explained by injection of energetic electrons, accelerated by the two flares, into the burst source. According to the heliographic observations we suggest the burst source was confined within a high coronal loop, which was a part of a relatively slow coronal mass ejection. The latter has been developed for several hours before the onset of the event. Through analyzing about 1.5 million of heliograms (3700 temporal frames with 4096 images in each frame that correspond to the number of frequency channels) the radio burst source imaging shows a fascinating dynamical evolution. Both space-based (GOES, SDO, SOHO, STEREO) data and various ground-based instrumentation (ORFEES, NDA, RSTO, NRH) records have been used for this study.
  • With a test-particle simulation, we investigate the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic fields on electron acceleration at an outward-propagating coronal shock with a circular front. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featured by partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. We show that the large-scale shock-field configuration, especially the relative curvature of the shock and the magnetic field line across which the shock is sweeping, plays an important role in the efficiency of electron acceleration. At low shock altitudes, when the shock curvature is larger than that of magnetic field lines, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock flanks; at higher altitudes, when the shock curvature is smaller, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock nose around the top of closed field lines. The above process reveals the shift of efficient electron acceleration region along the shock front during its propagation. It is also found that in general the electron acceleration at the shock flank is not so efficient as that at the top of closed field since at the top a collapsing magnetic trap can be formed. In addition, we find that the energy spectra of electrons is power-law like, first hardening then softening with the spectral index varying in a range of -3 to -6. Physical interpretations of the results and implications on the study of solar radio bursts are discussed.
  • Band split of solar type II radio bursts, discovered several decades ago, is a fascinating phenomenon with the type-II lanes exhibiting two almost-parallel sub-bands with similar morphology. The underlying split mechanism remains elusive. One popular interpretation is that the splitting bands are emitted from the shock upstream and downstream, respectively, with their frequency ratio ({\gamma}) determined by the shock compression ratio. This interpretation has been taken as the physical basis for many published references. Here we report an observational analysis of type II events with nice split selected from the ground-based RSTN data from 2001 to 2014, in the metric-decametric wavelength. We investigate the temporal variation and distribution of {\gamma}, and conduct correlation analyses on the deduced spectral values. It is found that {\gamma} varies in a very narrow range with >80% of {\gamma} (one-minute averaged data) being between 1.15 to 1.25. For some well-observed and long-lasting events, {\gamma} does not show a systematic variation trend within observational uncertainties, from the onset to the termination of the splits. In addition, the parameters representing the propagation speed of the radio source (presumably the coronal shock) show a very weak or basically no correlation with {\gamma}. We suggest that these results do not favor the upstreamdownstream scenario of band splits.
  • Two solar type II radio bursts, separated by ~24 hours in time, are examined together. Both events are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupting from the same active region (NOAA 11176) beneath a well-observed helmet streamer. We find that the type II emissions in both events ended once the CME/shock fronts passed the white-light streamer tip, which is presumably the magnetic cusp of the streamer. This leads us to conjecture that the closed magnetic arcades of the streamer may play a role in electron acceleration and type II excitation at coronal shocks. To examine such a conjecture, we conduct a test-particle simulation for electron dynamics within a large-scale partially-closed streamer magnetic configuration swept by a coronal shock. We find that the closed field lines play the role of an electron trap, via which the electrons are sent back to the shock front for multiple times, and therefore accelerated to high energies by the shock. Electrons with an initial energy of 300eV can be accelerated to tens of keV concentrating at the loop apex close to the shock front with a counter-streaming distribution at most locations. These electrons are energetic enough to excite Langmuir waves and radio bursts. Considering the fact that most solar eruptions originate from closed field regions, we suggest that the scenario may be important to the generation of more metric type IIs. This study also provides an explanation to the general ending frequencies of metric type IIs at or above 20-30 MHz and the disconnection issue between metric and interplanetary type IIs.
  • Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white-light imaging data are examined for a solar type II radio burst occurring on 2010 March 18 to deduce its source location. Using a bow-shock model, we reconstruct the 3-dimensional EUV wave front (presumably the type-II emitting shock) based on the imaging data of the two STEREO spacecraft. It is then combined with the Nan\c{c}ay radio imaging data to infer the 3-dimensional position of the type II source. It is found that the type II source coincides with the interface between the CME EUV wave front and a nearby coronal ray structure, providing evidence that the type II emission is physically related to the CME-ray interaction. This result, consistent with those of previous studies, is based on simultaneous radio and EUV imaging data for the first time.