• The main objective of this article is to study the nonlinear stability and dynamic transitions of the basic (zonal) shear flows for the three-dimensional continuously stratified rotating Boussinesq model. The model equations are fundamental equations in geophysical fluid dynamics, and dynamics associated with their basic zonal shear flows play a crucial role in understanding many important geophysical fluid dynamical processes, such as the meridional overturning oceanic circulation and the geophysical baroclinic instability. In this paper, first we derive a threshold for the energy stability of the basic shear flow, and obtain a criteria for nonlinear stability in terms of the critical horizontal wavenumbers and the system parameters such as the Froude number, the Rossby number, the Prandtl number and the strength of the shear flow. Next we demonstrate that the system always undergoes a dynamic transition from the basic shear flow to either a spatiotemporal oscillatory pattern or circle of steady states, as the shear strength $\Lambda$ of the basic flow crosses a critical threshold $\Lambda_c$. Also we show that the dynamic transition can be either continuous or catastrophic, and is dictated by the sign of a transition parameter $A$, fully characterizing the nonlinear interactions of different modes. A systematic numerical method is carried out to explore transition in different flow parameter regimes. We find that the system admits only critical eigenmodes with horizontal wave indices $(0,m_y)$. Such modes, horizontally have the pattern consisting of $m_y$-rolls aligned with the x-axis. Furthermore, numerically we encountered continuous transitions to multiple steady states, continuous and catastrophic transitions to spatiotemporal oscillations.
  • The main objective of this article is to derive a mathematical theory associated with the nonlinear stability and dynamic transitions of the basic shear flows associated with baroclinic instability, which plays a fundamental role in the dominant mechanism shaping the cyclones and anticyclones that dominate weather in mid-latitudes, as well as the mesoscale eddies that play various roles in oceanic dynamics and the transport of tracers. This article provides a general transition and stability theory for the two-layer quasi-geostrophic model originally derived by Pedlosky \cite{ped1970}. We show that the instability and dynamic transition of the basic shear flow occur only when the Froude number $F>(\gamma^2+1)/2$, where $\gamma$ is the weave number of lowest zonal harmonic. In this case, we derive a precise critical shear velocity $U_c$ and a dynamic transition number $b$, and we show that the dynamic transition and associated flo0w patterns are dictated by the sign of this transition number. In particular, we show that for $b>0$, the system undergoes a continuous transition, leading to spatiotemporal flow oscillatory patterns as the shear velocity $U$ crosses $U_c$; for $b<0$, the system undergoes a jump transition, leading to drastic change and more complex transition patterns in the far field, and to unstable period solutions for $U<U_c$. Furthermore, we show that when the wavenumber of the zonal harmonic $\gamma=1$, the transition number $b$ is always positive and the system always undergoes a continuous dynamic transition leading spatiotemporal oscillations. This suggests that a continuous transition to spatiotemporal patterns is preferable for the shear flow associated with baroclinic instability.
  • This article revisits the approximation problem of systems of nonlinear delay differential equations (DDEs) by a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). We work in Hilbert spaces endowed with a natural inner product including a point mass, and introduce polynomials orthogonal with respect to such an inner product that live in the domain of the linear operator associated with the underlying DDE. These polynomials are then used to design a general Galerkin scheme for which we derive rigorous convergence results and show that it can be numerically implemented via simple analytic formulas. The scheme so obtained is applied to three nonlinear DDEs, two autonomous and one forced: (i) a simple DDE with distributed delays whose solutions recall Brownian motion; (ii) a DDE with a discrete delay that exhibits bimodal and chaotic dynamics; and (iii) a periodically forced DDE with two discrete delays arising in climate dynamics. In all three cases, the Galerkin scheme introduced in this article provides a good approximation by low-dimensional ODE systems of the DDE's strange attractor, as well as of the statistical features that characterize its nonlinear dynamics.
  • The main aim of this paper is to describe the dynamic transitions in flows described by the two-dimensional, barotropic vorticity equation in a periodic zonal channel. In \cite{CGSW03}, the existence of a Hopf bifurcation in this model as the Reynolds number crosses a critical value was proven. In this paper, we extend the results in \cite{CGSW03} by addressing the stability problem of the bifurcated periodic solutions. Our main result is the explicit expression of a non-dimensional number $\gamma$ which controls the transition behavior. We prove that depending on $\gamma$, the modeled flow exhibits either a continuous (Type I) or catastrophic (Type II) transition. Numerical evaluation of $\gamma$ for a physically realistic region of parameter space suggest that a catastrophic transition is preferred in this flow.
  • The main objective of this article is to postulate a principle of interaction dynamics (PID) and to derive unified field equations coupling the four fundamental interactions based on first principles. PID is a least action principle subject to div$_A$-free constraints for the variational element with $A$ being gauge potentials. The Lagrangian action is uniquely determined by 1) the principle of general relativity, 2) the $U(1)$, $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ gauge invariances, 3) the Lorentz invariance, and 4) principle of principle of representation invariance (PRI), introduced in [11]. The unified field equations are then derived using PID. The unified field model spontaneously breaks the gauge symmetries, and gives rise to a new mechanism for energy and mass generation. The unified field model introduces a natural duality between the mediators and their dual mediators, and can be easily decoupled to study each individual interaction when other interactions are negligible. The unified field model, together with PRI and PID applied to individual interactions, provides clear explanations and solutions to a number of outstanding challenges in physics and cosmology, including e.g. the dark energy and dark matter phenomena, the quark confinement, asymptotic freedom, short-range nature of both strong and weak interactions, decay mechanism of sub-atomic particles, baryon asymmetry, and the solar neutrino problem.
  • This article proposes for stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) driven by additive noise, a novel approach for the approximate parameterizations of the ``small'' scales by the ``large'' ones, along with the derivaton of the corresponding reduced systems. This is accomplished by seeking for stochastic parameterizing manifolds (PMs) introduced in a previous work by the authors(*), which are random manifolds aiming to provide --- in a mean square sense --- such approximate parameterizations. Backward-forward systems are designed to give access to such PMs as pullback limits depending through the nonlinear terms on the time-history of the dynamics of the low modes when the latter is simply approximated by its stochastic linear component. It is shown that the corresponding pullback limits can be efficiently determined, leading in turn to an operational procedure for the derivation of non-Markovian reduced systems able to achieve good modeling performances in practice. This is illustrated on a stochastic Burgers-type equation, where it is shown that the corresponding non-Markovian features of these reduced systems play a key role to reach such performances.
  • A general approach to provide approximate parameterizations of the "small" scales by the "large" ones, is developed for stochastic partial differential equations driven by linear multiplicative noise. This is accomplished via the concept of parameterizing manifolds (PMs) that are stochastic manifolds which improve in mean square error the partial knowledge of the full SPDE solution $u$ when compared to the projection of $u$ onto the resolved modes, for a given realization of the noise. Backward-forward systems are designed to give access to such PMs in practice. The key idea consists of representing the modes with high wave numbers (as parameterized by the sought PM) as a pullback limit depending on the time-history of the modes with low wave numbers. The resulting manifolds obtained by such a procedure are not subject to a spectral gap condition such as encountered in the classical theory. Instead, certain PMs can be determined under weaker non-resonance conditions. Non-Markovian stochastic reduced systems are then derived based on such a PM approach. Such reduced systems take the form of SDEs involving random coefficients that convey memory effects via the history of the Wiener process, and arise from the nonlinear interactions between the low modes, embedded in the "noise bath." These random coefficients follow typically non-Gaussian statistics and exhibit an exponential decay of correlations whose rate depends explicitly on gaps arising in the non-resonances conditions. It is shown on a stochastic Burgers-type equation, that such PM-based reduced systems can achieve very good performance in reproducing statistical features of the SPDE dynamics projected onto the resolved modes, such as the autocorrelations and probability functions of the corresponding modes amplitude.
  • This article consists of two parts. The main objectives of Part 1 are to postulate a new principle of representation invariance (PRI), and to refine the unified field model of four interactions, derived using the principle of interaction dynamics (PID). Intuitively, PID takes the variation of the action functional under energy-momentum conservation constraint, and PRI requires that physical laws be independent of representations of the gauge groups. One important outcome of this field model is a natural duality between the interacting fields and the adjoint bosonic fields. This duality predicts two Higgs particles of similar mass with one due to weak interaction and the other due to strong interaction. The field model can be naturally decoupled to study individual interactions, leading to 1) modified Einstein equations, giving rise to a unified theory for dark matter and dark energy, 2) three levels of strong interaction potentials for quark, nucleon/hadron, and atom respectively, and 3) two weak interaction potentials. These potential/force formulas offer a clear mechanism for both quark confinement and asymptotic freedom. The main objectives of Part 2 are 1) to propose a sub-leptons and sub-quark model, which we call weakton model, and 2) to derive a mechanism for all sub-atomic decays and bremsstrahlung. The weakton model postulates that all matter particles and mediators are made up of massless weaktons. The weakton model offers a perfect explanation for all sub-atomic decays and all generation/annihilation precesses of matter-antimatter. In particular, the precise constituents of particles involved in all decays both before and after the reaction can now be precisely derived. In addition, the bremsstrahlung phenomena can be understood using the weakton model. Also, the weakton model offers an explanation to the baryon asymmetry problem.
  • We study the Rayleigh-B{\'e}nard convection in a 2-D rectangular domain with no-slip boundary conditions for the velocity. The main mathematical challenge is due to the no-slip boundary conditions, since the separation of variables for the linear eigenvalue problem which works in the free-slip case is no longer possible. It is well known that as the Rayleigh number crosses a critical threshold $R_c$, the system bifurcates to an attractor, which is an $(m-1)$--dimensional sphere, where $m$ is the number of eigenvalues which cross zero as R crosses $R_c$. The main objective of this article is to derive a full classification of the structure of this bifurcated attractor when $m=2$. More precisely, we rigorously prove that when $m=2$, the bifurcated attractor is homeomorphic to a one-dimensional circle consisting of exactly four or eight steady states and their connecting heteroclinic orbits. In addition, we show that the mixed modes can be stable steady states for small Prandtl numbers.
  • The main objective of this article is to derive a new set of gravitational field equations and to establish a new unified theory for dark energy and dark matter. The new gravitational field equations with scalar potential $\varphi$ are derived using the Einstein-Hilbert functional, and the scalar potential $\varphi$ is a natural outcome of the divergence-free constraint of the variational elements. Gravitation is now described by the Riemannian metric $g_{ij}$, the scalar potential $\varphi$ and their interactions, unified by the new gravitational field equations. Associated with the scalar potential $\varphi$ is the scalar potential energy density $\frac{c^4}{8\pi G} \Phi=\frac{c^4}{8\pi G} g^{ij}D_iD_j \varphi$, which represents a new type of energy caused by the non-uniform distribution of matter in the universe. The negative part of this potential energy density produces attraction, and the positive part produces repelling force. This potential energy density is conserved with mean zero: $\int_M \Phi dM=0$. The sum of this new potential energy density $\frac{c^4}{8\pi G} \Phi$ and the coupling energy between the energy-momentum tensor $T_{ij}$ and the scalar potential field $\varphi$ gives rise to a new unified theory for dark matter and dark energy: The negative part of this sum represents the dark matter, which produces attraction, and the positive part represents the dark energy, which drives the acceleration of expanding galaxies. In addition, the scalar curvature of space-time obeys $R=\frac{8\pi G}{c^4} T + \Phi$. Furthermore, the new field equations resolve a few difficulties encountered by the classical Einstein field equations.
  • The main objective of this article is to study the dynamic transition and pattern formation for chemotactic systems modeled by the Keller-Segel equations. We study chemotactic systems with either rich or moderated stimulant supplies. For the rich stimulant chemotactic system, we show that the chemotactic system always undergoes a Type-I or Type-II dynamic transition from the homogeneous state to steady state solutions. The type of transition is dictated by the sign of a non dimensional parameter $b$. For the general Keller-Segel model where the stimulant is moderately supplied, the system can undergo a dynamic transition to either steady state patterns or spatiotemporal oscillations. From the pattern formation point of view, the formation and the mechanism of both the lamella and rectangular patterns are derived.
  • The main objective of this article is to study the effect of spherical geometry on dynamic transitions and pattern formation for the Rayleigh-Benard convection. The study is mainly motivated by the importance of spherical geometry and convection in geophysical flows. It is shown in particular that the system always undergoes a continuous (Type-I) transition to a $2l_c$-dimensional sphere $S^{2lc}$, where lc is the critical wave length corresponding to the critical Rayleigh number. Furthermore, it has shown in [12] that it is critical to add nonisotropic turbulent friction terms in the momentum equation to capture the large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns. We show in particular that the system with turbulent friction terms added undergoes the same type of dynamic transition, and obtain an explicit formula linking the critical wave number (pattern selection), the aspect ratio, and the ratio between the horizontal and vertical turbulent friction coefficients.
  • The main objective of this article is to study the effect of the moisture on the planetary scale atmospheric circulation over the tropics. The modeling we adopt is the Boussinesq equations coupled with a diffusive equation of humidity and the humidity dependent heat source is modeled by a linear approximation of the humidity. The rigorous mathematical analysis is carried out using the dynamic transition theory. In particular, we obtain the same types of transitions and hence the scenario of the El Ni\~no mechanism as described in \cite{MW2,MW3}. The effect of the moisture only lowers slightly the magnitude of the critical thermal Rayleigh number.
  • The main objective of this article is to study the three-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection in a rectangular domain from a pattern formation perspective. It is well known that as the Rayleigh number crosses a critical threshold, the system undergoes a Type-I transition, characterized by an attractor bifurcation. The bifurcated attractor is an (m-1)-dimensional homological sphere where m is the multiplicity of the first critical eigenvalue. When m=1, the structure of this attractor is trivial. When m=2, it is known that the bifurcated attractor consists of steady states and their connecting heteroclinic orbits. The main focus of this article is then on the pattern selection mechanism and stability of rolls, rectangles and mixed modes (including hexagons) for the case where m=2. We derive in particular a complete classification of all transition scenarios, determining the patterns of the bifurcated steady states, their stabilities and the basin of attraction of the stable ones. The theoretical results lead to interesting physical conclusions, which are in agreement with known experimental results. For example, it is shown in this article that only the pure modes are stable whereas the mixed modes are unstable.
  • The main objectives of this article are two-fold. First, we study the effect of the nonlinear Onsager mobility on the phase transition and on the well-posedness of the Cahn-Hilliard equation modeling a binary system. It is shown in particular that the dynamic transition is essentially independent of the nonlinearity of the Onsager mobility. However, the nonlinearity of the mobility does cause substantial technical difficulty for the well-posedness and for carrying out the dynamic transition analysis. For this reason, as a second objective, we introduce a systematic approach to deal with phase transition problems modeled by quasilinear partial differential equation, following the ideas of the dynamic transition theory developed recently by Ma and Wang.
  • The main objective of this article is to study the order-disorder phase transition and pattern formation for systems with long-range repulsive interactions. The main focus is on the Cahn-Hilliard model with a nonlocal term in the corresponding energy functional, representing the long-range repulsive interaction. First, we show that as soon as the linear problem loses stability, the system always undergoes a dynamic transition to one of the three types, forming different patterns/structures. The types of transition are then dictated by a nondimensional parameter, measuring the interactions between the long-range repulsive term and the quadratic and cubic nonlinearities in the model. The derived explicit form of this parameter offers precise information for the phase diagrams. Second, we obtain a novel and explicit pattern selection mechanism associated with the competition between the long-range repulsive interaction and the short-range attractive interactions. In particular, the hexagonal pattern is unique to the long-range interaction, and is associated with a novel two-dimensional reduced transition equations on the center manifold generated by the unstable modes, consisting of (degenerate) quadratic terms and non-degenerate cubic terms. Finally, explicit information on the metastability and basin of attraction of different disordered/ordered states and patterns are derived as well.
  • The main objective of this paper is to describe the dynamic transition of the incompressible MHD equations in a three dimensional (3D) rectangular domain from a perspective of pattern formation.
  • We study the well-posedness and dynamic transitions of the surface tension driven convection in a three-dimensional (3D) rectangular box with non-deformable upper surface and with free-slip boundary conditions. It is shown that as the Marangoni number crosses the critical threshold, the system always undergoes a dynamic transition. In particular, two different scenarios are studied. In the first scenario, a single mode losing its stability at the critical parameter gives rise to either a Type-I (continuous) or a Type-II (jump) transition. The type of transitions is dictated by the sign of a computable non-dimensional parameter, and the numerical computation of this parameter suggests that a Type-I transition is favorable. The second scenario deals with the case where the geometry of the domain allows two critical modes which possibly characterize a hexagonal pattern. In this case we show that the transition can only be either a Type-II or a Type-III (mixed) transition depending on another computable non-dimensional parameter. We only encountered Type-III transition in our numerical calculations. The second part of the paper deals with the well-posedness and existence of global attractors for the problem.
  • Dynamic phase transitions of the Brusselator model is carefully analyzed, leading to a rigorous characterization of the types and structure of the phase transitions of the model from basic homogeneous states. The study is based on the dynamic transition theory developed recently by the authors.
  • The main objective of this article is to study the dynamic phase transitions associated with the spatial-temporal oscillations of the BZ reactions, given by Field, Koros and Noyes, also referred as the Oregonator. Two criteria are derived to determine 1) existence of either multiple equilibria or spatiotemporal oscillations, and 2) the types of transitions. These criteria gives a complete characterization of the dynamic transitions of the BZ systems from the homogeneous states. The analysis is carried out using a dynamic transition theory developed recently by the authors, which has been successfully applied to a number of problems in science.
  • The main objective of this article is to study the nature of the Andrews critical point in the gas-liquid transition in a physical-vapor transport (PVT) system. A dynamical model, consistent with the van der Waals equation near the Andrews critical point, is derived. With this model, we deduce two physical parameters, which interact exactly at the Andrews critical point, and which dictate the dynamic transition behavior near the Andrews critical point. In particular, it is shown that 1) the Andrews critical point is a switching point where the phase transition changes from the first order to the third order, 2) the gas-liquid co-existence curve can be extended beyond the Andrews critical point, and 3) the liquid-gas phase transition going beyond Andrews point is of the third order. This clearly explains why it is hard to observe the gas-liquid phase transition beyond the Andrews critical point. Furthermore, the analysis leads naturally the introduction of a general asymmetry principle of fluctuations and the preferred transition mechanism for a thermodynamic system.
  • The main objective of this article is to study both dynamic and structural transitions of the Taylor-Couette flow, using the dynamic transition theory and geometric theory of incompressible flows developed recently by the authors. In particular we show that as the Taylor number crosses the critical number, the system undergoes either a continuous or a jump dynamic transition, dictated by the sign of a computable, nondimensional parameter $R$. In addition, we show that the new transition states have the Taylor vortex type of flow structure, which is structurally stable.
  • In this article, we present a mathematical theory of the Walker circulation of the large-scale atmosphere over the tropics. This study leads to a new metastable state oscillation theory for the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a typical inter-annual climate low frequency oscillation. The mathematical analysis is based on 1) the dynamic transition theory, 2) the geometric theory of incompressible flows, and 3) the scaling law for proper effect of the turbulent friction terms, developed recently by the authors.
  • The main objective of this and its accompanying articles is to derive a mathematical theory associated with the thermohaline circulations (THC). This article provides a general transition and stability theory for the Boussinesq system, governing the motion and states of the large-scale ocean circulation. First, it is shown that the first transition is either to multiple steady states or to oscillations (periodic solutions), determined by the sign of a nondimensional parameter $K$, depending on the geometry of the physical domain and the thermal and saline Rayleigh numbers. Second, for both the multiple equilibria and periodic solutions transitions, both Type-I (continuous) and Type-II (jump) transitions can occur, and precise criteria are derived in terms of two computable nondimensional parameters $b_1$ and $b_2$. Associated with Type-II transitions are the hysteresis phenomena, and the physical reality is represented by either metastable states or by a local attractor away from the basic solution, showing more complex dynamical behavior. Third, a convection scale law is introduced, leading to an introduction of proper friction terms in the model in order to derive the correct circulation length scale. In particular, the dynamic transitions of the model with the derived friction terms suggest that the THC favors the continuous transitions to stable multiple equilibria. Applications of the theoretical analysis and results to different flow regimes will be explored in the accompanying articles.
  • The main objective of this article is to establish a new mechanism of the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), as a self-organizing and self-excitation system, with two highly coupled processes. The first is the oscillation between the two metastable warm (El Nino phase) and cold events (La Nina phase), and the second is the spatiotemporal oscillation of the sea surface temperature (SST) field. The interplay between these two processes gives rises the climate variability associated with the ENSO, leads to both the random and deterministic features of the ENSO, and defines a new natural feedback mechanism, which drives the sporadic oscillation of the ENSO. The new mechanism is rigorously derived using a dynamic transition theory developed recently by the authors, which has also been successfully applied to a wide range of problems in nonlinear sciences.