• The solar meridional flow is a crucial ingredient in modern dynamo theory. Seismic estimates of this flow have, however, been contradictory in deeper layers below about $0.9\,R_\odot$. Results from time-distance helioseismology have so far been obtained using the ray approximation. Here, we perform inversions using the Born approximation. The initial result is similar to the result previously obtained by Jackiewicz et al. (2015) using ray kernels while using the same set of GONG data and the SOLA inversion technique. However, we show that the assumption of uncorrelated measurements used in earlier studies may lead to inversion errors being underestimated by a factor of about two to four. In a second step, refined inversions are performed using the full covariance matrix and a regularization for cross-talk. As the results are found to depend on the threshold used in the singular value decomposition, they were obtained for a medium threshold ($10^{-7}-10^{-5}$, about 50% of the values used) and a threshold lower by a factor of 10 (about 70% of the values used). The result obtained with the medium threshold is again similar to the original, with less latitudinal variation. However, using the lower threshold, the inverted flow in the southern hemisphere shows two or three cells stacked radially depending on the associated radial flows. Both the single-cell and the multi-cell profiles are consistent with the measured travel times. All our results confirm a shallow return flow at about $0.9\,R_\odot$.
  • Accurate measurements of deep solar meridional flow are of vital interest for understanding the solar dynamo. In this paper, we validate a recently developed method for obtaining sensitivity functions (kernels) for travel-time measurements to solar interior flows using the Born approximation in spherical geometry, which is expected to be more accurate than the classical ray approximation. Furthermore, we develop a numerical approach to efficiently compute a large number of kernels based on the separability of the eigenfunctions into their horizontal and radial dependence. The validation is performed using a hydrodynamic simulation of linear wave propagation in the Sun, which includes a standard single-cell meridional flow profile. We show that, using the Born approximation, it is possible to accurately model observational quantities relevant for time-distance helioseismology such as the mean power spectrum, disc-averaged cross-covariance functions, and travel times in the presence of a flow field. In order to closely match the model to observations, we show that it is beneficial to use mode frequencies and damping rates which were extracted from the measured power spectrum. Furthermore, the contribution of the radial flow to the total travel time is found to reach 20% of the contribution of the horizontal flow at travel distances over $40^\circ$. Using the Born kernels and a 2D SOLA inversion of travel times, we can recover most features of the input meridional flow profile. The Born approximation is thus a promising method for inferring large-scale solar interior flows.
  • A recent processing effort has been undertaken in order to extend the range-of-coverage of the GONG merged dopplergrams. The GONG-Classic-era observations have now been merged to provide, albeit at lower resolution, mrvzi data as far back as May of 1995. The contents of this document provide an overview of what these data look like, the processing steps used to generate them from the original site observations, and the outcomes of a few initial quality-assurance tests designed to validate the final merged images. Based on these tests, the GONG project is releasing this data product to the user community (http://nisp.nso.edu/data).
  • We apply a new technique, the mutual information (MI) from information theory, to time-distance helioseismology, and demonstrate that it can successfully reproduce several classic results based on the widely used cross-covariance method. MI quantifies the deviation of two random variables from complete independence, and represents a more general method for detecting dependencies in time series than the cross-covariance function, which only detects linear relationships. We provide a brief description of the MI-based technique and discuss the results of the application of MI to derive the solar differential rotation profile, a travel-time deviation map for a sunspot and a time-distance diagram from quiet Sun measurements.
  • Large-scale plasma flows in the Sun's convection zone likely play a major role in solar dynamics on decadal timescales. In particular, quantifying meridional motions is a critical ingredient for understanding the solar cycle and the transport of magnetic flux. Because the signal of such features can be quite small in deep solar layers and be buried in systematics or noise, the true meridional velocity profile has remained elusive. We perform time-distance helioseismology measurements on several years worth of GONG Doppler data. A spherical harmonic decomposition technique is applied to a subset of acoustic modes to measure travel-time differences to try to obtain signatures of meridional flows throughout the solar convection zone. Center-to-limb systematics are taken into account in an intuitive, yet ad hoc manner. Travel-time differences near the surface that are consistent with a poleward flow in each hemisphere and are similar to previous work are measured. Additionally, measurements in deep layers near the base of the convection zone suggest a possible equatorward flow, as well as partial evidence of a sign change in the travel-time differences at mid-convection zone depths. This analysis on an independent data set using different measurement techniques strengthens recent conclusions that the convection zone may have multiple "cells" of meridional flow. The results may challenge the common understanding of one large conveyor belt operating in the solar convection zone. Further work with helioseismic inversions and a careful study of systematic effects are needed before firm conclusions of these large-scale flow structures can be made.