• Kondo-based semimetals and semiconductors are of extensive current interest as a viable platform for strongly correlated states. It is thus important to understand the routes towards such dilute-carrier correlated states. One established pathway is through Kondo effect in metallic non-magnetic analogues. Here we advance a new mechanism, through which Kondo-based semimetals develop out of conduction electrons with a low carrier-density in the presence of an even number of rare-earth sites. We demonstrate this effect by studying the Kondo material Yb3Ir4Ge13 along with its closed-f-shell counterpart, Lu3Ir4Ge13. Through magnetotransport, optical conductivity and thermodynamic measurements, we establish that the correlated semimetallic state of Yb3Ir4Ge13 below its Kondo temperature originates from the Kondo effect of a low carrier conduction-electron background. In addition, it displays fragile magnetism at very low temperatures, which, in turn, can be tuned to a non Fermi liquid regime through Lu-for-Yb substitution. These findings are connected with recent theoretical studies in simplified models. Our results open an entirely new venue to explore the strong correlation physics in a semimetallic environment.
  • Insulating states can be topologically nontrivial, a well-established notion that is exemplified by the quantum Hall effect and topological insulators. By contrast, topological metals have not been experimentally evidenced until recently. In systems with strong correlations, they have yet to be identified. Heavy fermion semimetals are a prototype of strongly correlated systems and, given their strong spin-orbit coupling, present a natural setting to make progress. Here we advance a Weyl-Kondo semimetal phase in a periodic Anderson model on a noncentrosymmetric lattice. The quasiparticles near the Weyl nodes develop out of the Kondo effect, as do the surface states that feature Fermi arcs. We determine the key signatures of this phase, which are realized in the heavy fermion semimetal Ce$_3$Bi$_4$Pd$_3$. Our findings provide the much-needed theoretical foundation for the experimental search of topological metals with strong correlations, and open up a new avenue for systematic studies of such quantum phases that naturally entangle multiple degrees of freedom.
  • Intermetallic type-I clathrates continue to attract attention as promising thermoelectric materials. Here we present structural and thermoelectric properties of single crystalline Ba8(Cu,Ga,Ge,v)46, where v denotes a vacancy. By single crystal X-ray diffraction on crystals without Ga we find clear evidence for the presence of vacancies at the 6c site in the structure. With increasing Ga content, vacancies are successively filled. This increases the charge carrier mobility strongly, even within a small range of Ga substitution, leading to reduced electrical resistivity and enhanced thermoelectric performance. The largest figure of merit ZT =0.9 at 900 K is found for a single crystal of approximate composition Ba8Cu4.6Ga1.0Ge40.4. This value, that may further increase at higher temperatures, is one of the largest to date found in transition metal element-based clathrates.
  • Studies on the heavy-fermion pyrochlore iridate (Pr$_2$Ir$_2$O$_7$) point to the role of time-reversal-symmetry breaking in geometrically frustrated Kondo lattices. With this motivation, here we study the effect of Kondo coupling and chiral spin liquids in a frustrated $J_1-J_2$ model on a square lattice. We treat the Kondo effect within a slave-fermion approach, and discuss our results in the context of a proposed global phase diagram for heavy fermion metals. We calculate the anomalous Hall response for the chiral states of both the Kondo destroyed and Kondo screened phases. Across the quantum critical point, a reconstruction of the Fermi surface leads to a sudden change of the Berry curvature distribution and, consequently, a jump of the anomalous Hall conductance. We discuss the implications of our results for the heavy-fermion pyrochlore iridate and propose an interface structure based on Kondo insulators to further explore such effects.
  • Recent experiments on quantum criticality in the Ge-substituted heavy-electron material YbRh2Si2 under magnetic field have revealed a possible non-Fermi liquid (NFL) strange metal (SM) state over a finite range of fields at low temperatures, which still remains a puzzle. In the SM region, the zero-field antiferromagnetism is suppressed. Above a critical field, it gives way to a heavy Fermi liquid with Kondo correlation. The T (temperature)-linear resistivity and the T-logarithmic followed by a power-law singularity in the specific heat coefficient at low T, salient NFL behaviours in the SM region, are un-explained. We offer a mechanism to address these open issues theoretically based on the competition between a quasi-2d fluctuating short-ranged resonant- valence-bonds (RVB) spin-liquid and the Kondo correlation near criticality. Via a field-theoretical renormalization group analysis on an effective field theory beyond a large-N approach to an anti- ferromagnetic Kondo-Heisenberg model, we identify the critical point, and explain remarkably well both the crossovers and the SM behaviour.
  • The "failed Kondo insulator" CeNiSn has long been suspected to be a nodal metal, with a node in the hybridization matrix elements. Here we carry out a series of Nernst effect experiments to delineate whether the severely anisotropic magnetotransport coefficients do indeed derive from a nodal metal or can simply be explained by a highly anisotropic Fermi surface. Our experiments reveal that despite an almost 20-fold anisotropy in the Hall conductivity, the large Nernst signal is isotropic. Taken in conjunction with the magnetotransport anisotropy, these results provide strong support for an isotropic Fermi surface with a large anisotropy in quasiparticle mass derived from a nodal hybridization.
  • Kondo insulators are emerging as a simplified setting to study both magnetic and metal-to-insulator quantum phase transitions. Here, we study a half-filled Kondo lattice model defined on a magnetically frustrated Shastry-Sutherland geometry. We determine a "global" phase diagram that features a variety of zero-temperature phases; these include Kondo-destroyed antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic metallic phases in addition to the Kondo-insulator phase. Our result provides the theoretical basis for understanding how applying pressure to a Kondo insulator can close its hybridization gap, liberate the local-moment spins from the conduction electrons, and lead to a magnetically correlated metal. We also study the momentum distribution of the single-particle excitations in the Kondo insulating state, and illustrate how Fermi-surface-like features emerge as a precursor to the actual Fermi surfaces of the Kondo-destroyed metals. We discuss the implications of our results for Kondo insulators including SmB$_6$.
  • Strongly correlated electron systems at the border of magnetism are of active current interest, particularly because the accompanying quantum criticality provides a route towards both strange-metal non-Fermi liquid behavior and unconventional superconductivity. Among the many important questions is whether the magnetism acts simply as a source of fluctuations in the textbook Landau framework, or instead serves as a proxy for some unexpected new physics. We put into this general context the recent developments on quantum phase transitions in antiferromagnetic heavy fermion metals. Among these are the extensive recent theoretical and experimental studies on the physics of Kondo destruction in a class of beyond-Landau quantum critical points. Also discussed are the theoretical basis for a global phase diagram of antiferromagnetic heavy fermion metals, and the recent surge of materials suitable for studying this phase diagram. Furthermore, we address the generalization of this global phase diagram to the case of Kondo insulators, and consider the future prospect to study the interplay among Kondo coherence, magnetism and topological states. Finally, we touch upon related issues beyond the antiferromagnetic settings, arising in mixed valent, ferromagnetic, quadrupolar, or spin glass f-electron systems, as well as some general issues on emergent phases near quantum critical points.
  • One of the key requirements for good thermoelectric materials is a low lattice thermal conductivity. Here we present a combined neutron scattering and theoretical investigation of the lattice dynamics in the type I clathrate system Ba-Ge-Ni, which fulfills this requirement. We observe a strong hybridization between phonons of the Ba guest atoms and acoustic phonons of the Ge-Ni host structure over a wide region of the Brillouin zone which is in contrast with the frequently adopted picture of isolated Ba atoms in Ge-Ni host cages. It occurs without a strong decrease of the acoustic phonon lifetime which contradicts the usual assumption of strong anharmonic phonon--phonon scattering processes. Within the framework of ab-intio density functional theory calculations we interpret these hybridizations as a series of an ti-crossings which act as a low pass filter, preventing the propagation of acoustic phonons. To highlight the effect of such a phononic low pass filter on the thermal transport, we compute the contribution of acoustic phonons to the thermal conductivity of Ba$_8$Ge$_{40}$Ni$_{6}$ and compare it to those of pure Ge and a Ge$_{46}$ empty-cage model system.
  • YbRh2Si2 is a model system for quantum criticality. Particularly, Hall effect measurements helped identify the unconventional nature of its quantum critical point. Here, we present a high-resolution study of the Hall effect and magnetoresistivity on samples of different quality. We find a robust crossover on top of a sample dependent linear background contribution. Our detailed analysis provides a complete characterization of the crossover in terms of its position, width, and height. Importantly, we find in the extrapolation to zero temperature a discontinuity of the Hall coefficient occurring at the quantum critical point for all samples. Particularly, the height of the jump in the Hall coefficient remains finite in the limit of zero temperature. Hence, our data solidify the conclusion of a collapsing Fermi surface. Finally, we contrast our results to the smooth Hall-effect evolution seen in Chromium, the prototype system for a spin-density-wave quantum critical point.
  • Quantum criticality arises when a macroscopic phase of matter undergoes a continuous transformation at zero temperature. While the collective fluctuations at quantum-critical points are being increasingly recognized as playing an important role in a wide range of quantum materials, the nature of the underlying quantum-critical excitations remains poorly understood. Here we report in-depth measurements of the Hall effect in the heavy-fermion metal YbRh2Si2, a prototypical system for quantum criticality. We isolate a rapid crossover of the isothermal Hall coefficient clearly connected to the quantum-critical point from a smooth background contribution; the latter exists away from the quantum-critical point and is detectable through our studies only over a wide range of magnetic field. Importantly, the width of the critical crossover is proportional to temperature, which violates the predictions of conventional theory and is instead consistent with an energy over temperature, E/T, scaling of the quantum-critical single-electron fluctuation spectrum. Our results provide evidence that the quantum-dynamical scaling and a critical Kondo breakdown simultaneously operate in the same material. Correspondingly, we infer that macroscopic scale-invariant fluctuations emerge from the microscopic many-body excitations associated with a collapsing Fermi-surface. This insight is expected to be relevant to the unconventional finite-temperature behavior in a broad range of strongly correlated quantum systems.