• We analyse the near-infrared interline sky background, OH and O2 emission in 19 hours of H band observations with the GNOSIS OH suppression unit and the IRIS2 spectrograph at the 3.9-m AAT. We find that the temporal behaviour of OH emission is best described by a gradual decrease during the first half of the night followed by a gradual increase during the second half of the night following the behaviour of the solar elevation angle. We measure the interline background at 1.520 microns where the instrumental thermal background is very low and study its variation with zenith distance, time after sunset, ecliptic latitude, lunar zenith angle and lunar distance to determine the presence of non-thermal atmospheric emission, zodiacal scattered light and scattered moonlight. Zodiacal scattered light is too faint to be detected in the summed observations. Scattered moonlight due to Mie scattering by atmospheric aerosols is seen at small lunar distances (< 11 deg), but is otherwise too faint to detect. Except at very small lunar distances the interline background at a resolving power of R~2400 when using OH suppression fibres is dominated by a non-thermal atmospheric source with a temporal behaviour that resembles atmospheric OH emission suggesting that the interline background contains instrumentally-scattered OH. However, the interline background dims more rapidly than OH early in the night suggesting contributions from rapid dimming molecules. The absolute interline background is 560 +/- 120 photons s^-1 m^-2 micron^-1 arcsec^-2 under dark conditions. This value is similar to previous measurements without OH suppression suggesting that non-suppressed atmospheric emission is responsible for the interline background. Future OH suppression fibre designs may address this by the suppression of more sky lines using more accurate sky line measurements taken from high resolution spectra.
  • GNOSIS is a prototype astrophotonic instrument that utilizes OH suppression fibres consisting of fibre Bragg gratings and photonic lanterns to suppress the 103 brightest atmospheric emission doublets between 1.47-1.7 microns. GNOSIS was commissioned at the 3.9-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope with the IRIS2 spectrograph to demonstrate the potential of OH suppression fibres, but may be potentially used with any telescope and spectrograph combination. Unlike previous atmospheric suppression techniques GNOSIS suppresses the lines before dispersion and in a manner that depends purely on wavelength. We present the instrument design and report the results of laboratory and on-sky tests from commissioning. While these tests demonstrated high throughput and excellent suppression of the skylines by the OH suppression fibres, surprisingly GNOSIS produced no significant reduction in the interline background and the sensitivity of GNOSIS and IRIS2 is about the same as IRIS2. It is unclear whether the lack of reduction in the interline background is due to physical sources or systematic errors as the observations are detector noise-dominated. OH suppression fibres could potentially impact ground-based astronomy at the level of adaptive optics or greater. However, until a clear reduction in the interline background and the corresponding increasing in sensitivity is demonstrated optimized OH suppression fibres paired with a fibre-fed spectrograph will at least provide a real benefits at low resolving powers.
  • We present the first scientific results from the Sydney-AAO Multi-Object IFS (SAMI) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. This unique instrument deploys 13 fused fibre bundles (hexabundles) across a one-degree field of view allowing simultaneous spatially-resolved spectroscopy of 13 galaxies. During the first SAMI commissioning run, targeting a single galaxy field, one object (ESO 185-G031) was found to have extended minor axis emission with ionisation and kinematic properties consistent with a large-scale galactic wind. The importance of this result is two-fold: (i) fibre bundle spectrographs are able to identify low-surface brightness emission arising from extranuclear activity; (ii) such activity may be more common than presently assumed because conventional multi-object spectrographs use single-aperture fibres and spectra from these are nearly always dominated by nuclear emission. These early results demonstrate the extraordinary potential of multi-object hexabundle spectroscopy in future galaxy surveys.
  • Using 10 095 galaxies (B < 20 mag) from the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue, we derive B-band luminosity distributions and selected bivariate brightness distributions for the galaxy population. All subdivisions extract highly correlated sub-sets of the galaxy population which consistently point towards two overlapping distributions. A clear bimodality in the observed distribution is seen in both the rest-(u-r) colour and log(n) distributions. The rest-(u-r) colour bimodality becomes more pronounced when using the core colour as opposed to global colour. The two populations are extremely well separated in the colour-log(n) plane. Using our sample of 3 314 (B < 19 mag) eyeball classified galaxies, we show that the bulge-dominated, early-type galaxies populate one peak and the bulge-less, late-type galaxies occupy the second. The early- and mid-type spirals sprawl across and between the peaks. This constitutes extremely strong evidence that the fundamental way to divide the luminous galaxy population is into bulges and discs and that the galaxy bimodality reflects the two component nature of galaxies and not two distinct galaxy classes. We argue that these two-components require two independent formation mechanisms/processes and advocate early bulge formation through initial collapse and ongoing disc formation through splashback, infall and merging/accretion. We calculate the B-band luminosity-densities and stellar-mass densities within each subdivision and estimate that the z ~ 0 stellar mass content in spheroids, bulges and discs is 35 +/- 2 per cent, 18 +/- 7 and 47 +/- 7 per cent respectively. [Abridged]