• In this paper we describe the routine photometric calibration of data taken with the VIRCAM instrument on the ESO VISTA telescope. The broadband ZYJHKs data are directly calibrated from 2MASS point sources visible in every VISTA image. We present the empirical transformations between the 2MASS and VISTA, and WFCAM and VISTA, photometric systems for regions of low reddening. We investigate the long-term performance of VISTA+VIRCAM. An investigation of the dependence of the photometric calibration on interstellar reddening leads to these conclusions: (1) For all broadband filters, a linear colour-dependent correction compensates the gross effects of reddening where $E(B-V)<5.0$. (2) For $Z$ and $Y$, there is a significantly larger scatter above E(B-V)=5.0, and insufficient measurements to adequately constrain the relation beyond this value. (3) The $JHK\!s$ filters can be corrected to a few percent up to E(B-V)=10.0. We analyse spatial systematics over month-long timescales, both inter- and intra-detector and show that these are present only at very low levels in VISTA. We monitor and remove residual detector-to-detector offsets. We compare the calibration of the main pipeline products: pawprints and tiles. We show how variable seeing and transparency affect the final calibration accuracy of VISTA tiles, and discuss a technique, {\it grouting}, for mitigating these effects. Comparison between repeated reference fields is used to demonstrate that the VISTA photometry is precise to better than $\simeq2\%$ for the $Y$$J$$H$$Ks$ bands and $3\%$ for the $Z$ bands. Finally we present empirically determined offsets to transform VISTA magnitudes into a true Vega system.
  • We present the discovery of NGTS-1b, a hot-Jupiter transiting an early M-dwarf host ($T_{eff}=3916^{+71}_{-63}~K$) in a P=2.674d orbit discovered as part of the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS). The planet has a mass of $0.812^{+0.066}_{-0.075}~M_{J}$, making it the most massive planet ever discovered transiting an M-dwarf. The radius of the planet is $1.33^{+0.61}_{-0.33}~R_{J}$. Since the transit is grazing, we determine this radius by modelling the data and placing a prior on the density from the population of known gas giant planets. NGTS-1b is the third transiting giant planet found around an M-dwarf, reinforcing the notion that close-in gas giants can form and migrate similar to the known population of hot Jupiters around solar type stars. The host star shows no signs of activity, and the kinematics hint at the star being from the thick disk population. With a deep (2.5%) transit around a $K=11.9$ host, NGTS-1b will be a strong candidate to probe giant planet composition around M-dwarfs via JWST transmission spectroscopy.
  • We describe the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS), which is a ground-based project searching for transiting exoplanets orbiting bright stars. NGTS builds on the legacy of previous surveys, most notably WASP, and is designed to achieve higher photometric precision and hence find smaller planets than have previously been detected from the ground. It also operates in red light, maximising sensitivity to late K and early M dwarf stars. The survey specifications call for photometric precision of 0.1 per cent in red light over an instantaneous field of view of 100 square degrees, enabling the detection of Neptune-sized exoplanets around Sun-like stars and super-Earths around M dwarfs. The survey is carried out with a purpose-built facility at Cerro Paranal, Chile, which is the premier site of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). An array of twelve 20cm f/2.8 telescopes fitted with back-illuminated deep-depletion CCD cameras are used to survey fields intensively at intermediate Galactic latitudes. The instrument is also ideally suited to ground-based photometric follow-up of exoplanet candidates from space telescopes such as TESS, Gaia and PLATO. We present observations that combine precise autoguiding and the superb observing conditions at Paranal to provide routine photometric precision of 0.1 per cent in 1 hour for stars with I-band magnitudes brighter than 13. We describe the instrument and data analysis methods as well as the status of the survey, which achieved first light in 2015 and began full survey operations in 2016. NGTS data will be made publicly available through the ESO archive.
  • Spectroscopic studies have demonstrated that nearly all Galactic globular clusters (GCs) harbour multiple stellar populations with different chemical compositions. Moreover, colour-magnitude diagrams based exclusively on Str\"omgrem photometry have allowed us to identify and characterise multiple populations along the RGB of a large number of clusters. In this paper we show for the first time that Str\"omgren photometry is also very effcient at identifying multiple populations along the AGB, and demonstrate that the AGB of M3, M92, NGC362, NGC1851, and NGC6752 are not consistent with a single stellar population. We also provide a catalogue of RGB and AGB stars photometrically identified in these clusters for further spectroscopic follow-up studies.We combined photometry and elemental abundances from the literature for RGB and AGB stars in NGC6752 where the presence of multiple populations along the AGB has been widely debated. We find that, while the MS, SGB, and RGB host three stellar populations with different helium and light element abundances, only two populations of AGB stars are present in the cluster. These results are consistent with standard evolutionary theory.
  • The tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole leads to a short-lived thermal flare. Despite extensive searches, radio follow-up observations of known thermal stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) have not yet produced a conclusive detection. We present a detection of variable radio emission from a thermal TDF, which we interpret as originating from a newly-launched jet. The multi-wavelength properties of the source present a natural analogy with accretion state changes of stellar mass black holes, suggesting all TDFs could be accompanied by a jet. In the rest frame of the TDF, our radio observations are an order of magnitude more sensitive than nearly all previous upper limits, explaining how these jets, if common, could thus far have escaped detection.
  • On the 19th of December 2013, the Gaia spacecraft was successfully launched by a Soyuz rocket from French Guiana and started its amazing journey to map and characterise one billion celestial objects with its one billion pixel camera. In this presentation, we briefly review the general aims of the mission and describe what has happened since launch, including the Ecliptic Pole scanning mode. We also focus especially on binary stars, starting with some basic observational aspects, and then turning to the remarkable harvest that Gaia is expected to yield for these objects.
  • The recently approved NASA K2 mission has the potential to multiply by an order of magnitude the number of short-period transiting planets found by Kepler around bright and low-mass stars, and to revolutionise our understanding of stellar variability in open clusters. However, the data processing is made more challenging by the reduced pointing accuracy of the satellite, which has only two functioning reaction wheels. We present a new method to extract precise light curves from K2 data, combining list-driven, soft-edged aperture photometry with a star-by-star correction of systematic effects associated with the drift in the roll-angle of the satellite about its boresight. The systematics are modelled simultaneously with the stars' intrinsic variability using a semi-parametric Gaussian process model. We test this method on a week of data collected during an engineering test in January 2014, perform checks to verify that our method does not alter intrinsic variability signals, and compute the precision as a function of magnitude on long-cadence (30-min) and planetary transit (2.5-hour) timescales. In both cases, we reach photometric precisions close to the precision reached during the nominal Kepler mission for stars fainter than 12th magnitude, and between 40 and 80 parts per million for brighter stars. These results confirm the bright prospects for planet detection and characterisation, asteroseismology and stellar variability studies with K2. Finally, we perform a basic transit search on the light curves, detecting 2 bona fide transit-like events, 7 detached eclipsing binaries and 13 classical variables.
  • The Wide Field Camera Transit Survey is a pioneer program aimed to search for extra-solar planets in the near-infrared. The standard data reduction pipeline of the program uses aperture photometry to construct the light curves. We alternatively apply the difference imaging method for the most complete field in the survey and carry out a quantitative comparison between the photometric precision of both methods for objects with J<18. We also report an implementation on the box-fitting detection algorithm, which performs a trapezoid-fit to the folded light curve. Subsequently a set of selection criteria are optimized and applied to the light curves to search for transit candidates, incorporating a parameter to characterize the shape of the transit. We carry out a detailed analysis in the 18 best detections and classify them as transiting planet and eclipsing binary candidates. One planet candidate orbiting a late G-type star is reported. No planet candidate around M-stars has been found, which enabled us to set an upper limit on the occurrence rate of short period giant planets around M-dwarfs in the survey of 1.1%. Furthermore we report the detection of five faint extremely-short period eclipsing binary systems with periods shorter than 0.23 days and three candidate M-dwarf/M-dwarf eclipsing binaries. The detections demonstrate the benefits of using the difference imaging light curves especially when going to fainter magnitudes.
  • We present a comparative study of the thermal emission of the transiting exoplanets WASP-1b and WASP-2b using the Spitzer Space Telescope. The two planets have very similar masses but suffer different levels of irradiation and are predicted to fall either side of a sharp transition between planets with and without hot stratospheres. WASP-1b is one of the most highly irradiated planets studied to date. We measure planet/star contrast ratios in all four of the IRAC bands for both planets (3.6-8.0um), and our results indicate the presence of a strong temperature inversion in the atmosphere of WASP-1b, particularly apparent at 8um, and no inversion in WASP-2b. In both cases the measured eclipse depths favor models in which incident energy is not redistributed efficiently from the day side to the night side of the planet. We fit the Spitzer light curves simultaneously with the best available radial velocity curves and transit photometry in order to provide updated measurements of system parameters. We do not find significant eccentricity in the orbit of either planet, suggesting that the inflated radius of WASP-1b is unlikely to be the result of tidal heating. Finally, by plotting ratios of secondary eclipse depths at 8um and 4.5um against irradiation for all available planets, we find evidence for a sharp transition in the emission spectra of hot Jupiters at an irradiation level of 2 x 10^9 erg/s/cm^2. We suggest this transition may be due to the presence of TiO in the upper atmospheres of the most strongly irradiated hot Jupiters.