• We consider the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in the gravitational field of the Sun within the first post-Newtonian approximation of the general theory of relativity. We solve Maxwell's equations for the EM field propagating on the background of a static mass monopole and find an exact closed form solution for the Debye potentials, which, in turn, yield a solution to the problem of diffraction of EM waves in the gravitational field of the Sun. The solution is given in terms of the confluent hypergeometric function and, as such, it is valid for all distances and angles. Using this solution, we develop a wave-theoretical description of the solar gravitational lens (SGL) and derive expressions for the EM field and energy flux in the immediate vicinity of the focal line of the SGL. Aiming at the potential practical applications of the SGL, we study its optical properties and discuss its suitability for direct high-resolution imaging of a distant exoplanet.
  • Accurate astrometry is crucial for determining orbits of near-Earth-asteroids (NEAs) and therefore better tracking them. This paper reports on a demonstration of 10 milliarcsecond-level astrometric precision on a dozen NEAs using the Pomona College 40 inch telescope, at the JPL's Table Mountain Facility. We used the technique of synthetic tracking, in which many short exposure (1 second) images are acquired and then combined in post-processing to track both target asteroid and reference stars across the field of view. This technique avoids the trailing loss and keeps the jitter effects from atmosphere and telescope pointing common between the asteroid and reference stars, resulting in higher astrometric precision than the 100 mas level astrometry from traditional approach of using long exposure images. Treating our synthetic tracking of near-Earth asteroids as a proxy for observations of future spacecraft while they are downlinking data via their high rate optical communication laser beams, our approach shows precision plane-of-sky measurements can be obtained by the optical ground terminals for navigation. We also discuss how future data releases from the Gaia mission can improve our results.
  • We study the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in the solar system and develop a Mie theory that accounts for the refractive properties of the free electron plasma in the extended solar corona. We use a generic model for the electron number density distribution and apply the eikonal approximation to find a solution in terms of Debye potentials, which is then used to determine the EM field both within the inner solar system as well as at large heliocentric distances. As expected, the solution for the EM wave propagating through the solar system is characterized by a plasma-induced phase shift. Our approach quantitatively accounts for this effect providing a wave-optical treatment of the phenomenon. As such, it may be used in a number of practical applications involving big apertures, large interferometric baselines or otherwise widely distributed high-precision astronomical instruments.
  • The Solar Gravitational Lens (SGL) allows for major brightness amplification ($\sim 10^{11}$ at wavelength of $1~\mu$m) and extreme angular resolution ($\sim10^{-10}$ arcsec) within a narrow field of view. A meter-class telescope, with a modest coronagraph to block solar light with 1e-6 suppression placed in the focal area of the SGL, can image an exoplanet at a distance of 30 parsec with few kilometer-scale resolution on its surface. Notably, spectroscopic broadband SNR is $\sim 10^{-6}$ in two weeks of integration time, providing this instrument with incredible remote sensing capabilities. A mission capable of exploiting the remarkable optical properties of the SGL allows for direct high-resolution imaging/spectroscopy of a potentially habitable exoplanet. Such missions could allow exploration of exoplanets relying on the SGL capabilities decades, if not centuries, earlier than possible with other extant technologies.
  • Because of the recent technological advances, the key technologies needed for precision space optical astrometry are now in hand. The Microarcsecond Astrometry Probe (MAP) mission concept is designed to find 1 Earth mass planets at 1AU orbit (scaled to solar luminosity) around the nearest ~90 FGK stars. The MAP payload includes i) a single three-mirror anastigmatic telescope with a 1-m primary mirror and metrology subsystems, and ii) a camera. The camera focal plane consists of 42 detectors, providing a Nyquist sampled FOV of 0.4-deg. Its metrology subsystems ensure that MAP can achieve the 0.8 uas astrometric precision in 1 hr, which is required to detect Earth-like exoplanets in our stellar neighborhood. MAP mission could provide ~10 specific targets for a much larger coronagraphic mission that would measure its spectra. We argue for the development of the space astrometric missions capable of finding Earth-2.0. Given the current technology readiness such missions relying on precision astrometry could be flown in the next decade, perhaps in collaboration with other national space agencies.
  • We study the electromagnetic (EM) field in the shadow cast by a large opaque sphere. For this, we consider the scattering of a high frequency monochromatic EM wave by the large sphere and develop a Mie theory that accounts for the presence of this obscuration. Applying fully absorbing boundary conditions, we find a solution for the Debye potentials, which we use to determine the EM field in the shadow in the wave zone at large distances from the sphere. We use the standard tools available from the nuclear scattering theory to develop the wave-optical treatment of the problem. Based on this treatment, we demonstrate that there is no EM field deep in the shadow, except for the field that is diffracted into the shadow by the edges of the sphere, as anticipated.
  • The remarkable optical properties of the solar gravitational lens (SGL) include major brightness amplification (~1e11 at wavelength of 1 um) and extreme angular resolution (~1e-10 arcsec) in a narrow field of view. A mission to the SGL carrying a modest telescope and coronagraph opens up a possibility for direct megapixel imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy of a habitable Earth-like exoplanet at a distance of up to 100 light years. The entire image of such a planet is compressed by the SGL into a region with a diameter of ~1.3 km in the vicinity of the focal line. The telescope, acting as a single pixel detector while traversing this region, can build an image of the exoplanet with kilometer-scale resolution of its surface, enough to see its surface features and signs of habitability. We report here on the results of our initial study of a mission to the deep outer regions of our solar system, with the primary mission objective of conducting direct megapixel high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of a potentially habitable exoplanet by exploiting the remarkable optical properties of the SGL. Our main goal was to investigate what it takes to operate spacecraft at such enormous distances with the needed precision. Specifically, we studied i) how a space mission to the focal region of the SGL may be used to obtain high-resolution direct imaging and spectroscopy of an exoplanet by detecting, tracking, and studying the Einstein ring around the Sun, and ii) how such information could be used to detect signs of life on another planet. Our results indicate that a mission to the SGL with an objective of direct imaging and spectroscopy of a distant exoplanet is challenging, but possible. We composed a list of recommendations on the mission architectures with risk and return tradeoffs and discuss an enabling technology development program.
  • We discuss the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in the post-Newtonian approximation of the general theory of relativity. We consider diffraction of EM waves in the static gravitational field of a massive monopole. We develop a wave-theoretical description of the solar gravitational lens (SGL) and show that with its enormous magnifying power of $\sim 10^{11}$ (for $\lambda=1~\mu$m) and angular resolution of $\lesssim 10^{-10}$ arcsec, the SGL may be used for direct megapixel imaging of an exoplanet.
  • We present a new space mission concept that is capable of finding, detecting, and tracking 90% of near-Earth objects (NEO) with H magnitude of $\rm H\leq22$ (i.e., $\sim$140 m in size) that are potentially hazardous to the Earth. The new mission concept relies on two emerging technologies: the technique of synthetic tracking and the new generation of small and capable interplanetary spacecraft. Synthetic tracking is a technique that de-streaks asteroid images by taking multiple fast exposures. With synthetic tracking, an 800 sec observation with a 10 cm telescope in space can detect a moving object with apparent magnitude of 20.5 without losing sensitivity from streaking. We refer to NEOs with a minimum orbit intersection distance of $< 0.002$ au as Earth-grazers (EGs), representing typical albedo distributions. We show that a constellation of six SmallSats (comparable in size to 9U CubeSats) equipped with 10 cm synthetic tracking cameras and evenly-distributed in 1.0 au heliocentric orbit could detect 90% of EGs with $\rm H \leq 22~mag$ in $\sim$3.8 years of observing time. A more advanced constellation of nine 20 cm telescopes could detect 90% of $\rm H=24.2~mag$ (i.e., $\rm \sim 50~m$ in size) EGs in less than 5 years.
  • We develop a high-precision model for relativistic observables of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). We develop all relativistic coordinate transformations that are needed to describe the motion of ACES in Earth orbit and to compute observable quantities. We analyze the accuracy of the required model as it applies to the proper-to-coordinate time transformations, light time equation, and spacecraft equations of motion. We consider various sources of nongravitational noise and their effects on ACES. We estimate the accuracy of orbit reconstruction that is needed to satisfy the ACES science objectives. Based on our analysis, we derive models for the relativistic observables of ACES, which also account for the contribution of atmospheric drag on the clock rate. We include the Earth's oblateness coefficient $J_2$ and the effects of major nongravitational forces on the orbit of the ISS. We demonstrate that the ACES reference frame is pseudo-inertial at the level of accuracy required by the experiment. We construct a Doppler-canceled science observable representing the gravitational redshift. We derive accuracy requirements for ISS navigation. The improved model is accurate up to $<1$ ps and $\sim 4\times 10^{-17}$ for time and frequency transfers, correspondingly. These limits are determined by the higher order harmonics in Earth's gravitational potential.
  • This is a joint summary of the reports from the three Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) in response to the "Planning for the 2020 Decadal Survey" charge given by the Astrophysics Division Director Paul Hertz. This joint executive summary contains points of consensus across all three PAGs. Additional findings specific to the individual PAGs are reported separately in the individual reports. The PAGs concur that all four large mission concepts identified in the white paper as candidates for maturation prior to the 2020 Decadal Survey should be studied in detail. These include the Far-IR Surveyor, the Habitable-Exoplanet Imaging Mission, the UV/Optical/IR Surveyor, and the X-ray Surveyor. This finding is predicated upon assumptions outlined in the white paper and subsequent charge, namely that 1) major development of future large flagship missions under consideration are to follow the implementation phases of JWST and WFIRST; 2) NASA will partner with the European Space Agency on its L3 Gravitational Wave Surveyor; 3) the Inflation Probe be classified as a probe-class mission to be developed according to the 2010 Decadal Survey report. If these key assumptions were to change, this PAG finding would need to be re-evaluated. The PAGs find that there is strong community support for the second phase of this activity - maturation of the four proposed mission concepts via Science and Technology Definition Teams (STDTs). The PAGs find that there is strong consensus that all of the STDTs contain broad and interdisciplinary representation of the science community. Finally, the PAGs find that there is community support for a line of Probe-class missions within the Astrophysics mission portfolio (condensed).
  • We present a new approach to describe the dynamics of an isolated, gravitationally bound astronomical $N$-body system in the weak field and slow-motion approximation of the general theory of relativity. Celestial bodies are described using an arbitrary energy-momentum tensor and assumed to possess any number of internal multipole moments. The solution of the gravitational field equations in any reference frame is presented as a sum of three terms: i) the inertial flat spacetime in that frame, ii) unperturbed solutions for each body in the system that is covariantly transformed to the coordinates of this frame, and iii) the gravitational interaction term. We use the harmonic gauge conditions that allow reconstruction of a significant part of the structure of the post-Galilean coordinate transformation functions relating global coordinates of the inertial reference frame to the local coordinates of the non-inertial frame associated with a particular body. The remaining parts of these functions are determined from dynamical conditions, obtained by constructing the relativistic proper reference frame associated with a particular body. In this frame, the effect of external forces acting on the body is balanced by the fictitious frame-reaction force that is needed to keep the body at rest with respect to the frame, conserving its relativistic three-momentum. The resulting post-Galilean coordinate transformations have an approximate group structure that extends the Poincar'e group of global transformations to the case of accelerating observers in a gravitational field of $N$-body system. We present and discuss the structure of the metric tensors corresponding to the reference frames involved, the rules for transforming relativistic gravitational potentials, the coordinate transformations between frames and the resulting relativistic equations of motion.
  • We report a detection of a faint near-Earth asteroid (NEA), which was done using our synthetic tracking technique and the CHIMERA instrument on the Palomar 200-inch telescope. This asteroid, with apparent magnitude of 23, was moving at 5.97 degrees per day and was detected at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 15 using 30 sec of data taken at a 16.7 Hz frame rate. The detection was confirmed by a second observation one hour later at the same SNR. The asteroid moved 7 arcseconds in sky over the 30 sec of integration time because of its high proper motion. The synthetic tracking using 16.7 Hz frames avoided the trailing loss suffered by conventional techniques relying on 30-sec exposure, which would degrade the surface brightness of image on CCD to an approximate magnitude of 25. This detection was a result of our 12-hour blind search conducted on the Palomar 200-inch telescope over two nights on September 11 and 12, 2013 scanning twice over six 5.0 deg x 0.043 deg fields. The fact that we detected only one NEA, is consistent with Harris's estimation of the asteroid population distribution, which was used to predict the detection of 1--2 asteroids of absolute magnitude H=28--31 per night. The design of experiment, data analysis method, and algorithms for estimating astrometry are presented. We also demonstrate a milli-arcsecond astrometry using observations of two bright asteroids with the same system on Apr 3, 2013. Strategies of scheduling observations to detect small and fast-moving NEAs with the synthetic tracking technique are discussed.
  • We develop a high-precision model for laser ranging interferometric (LRI) observables of the GRACE Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission. For this, we study the propagation of an electromagnetic wave in the gravitational field in the vicinity of an extended body, in the post-Newtonian approximation of the general theory of relativity. We present a general relativistic model for the phase of a plane wave that accounts for contributions of all the multipoles of the gravitating body, its angular momentum, as well as the contribution of tidal fields produced by external sources. We develop a new approach to model a coherent signal transmission in the gravitational field of the solar system that relies on a relativistic treatment of the phase. We use this approach to describe high-precision interferometric measurements on GRACE-FO and formulate the key LRI observables, namely the phase and phase rate of a coherent laser link between the two spacecraft. We develop a relativistic model for the LRI-enabled range between the two GRACE-FO spacecraft, accurate to less than 1 nm, and a high-precision model for the corresponding range rate, accurate to better than 0.1 nm/s. We also formulate high-precision relativistic models for the double one-way range (DOWR) and DOWR-enabled range rate observables originally used on GRACE and now studied for interferometric measurements on GRACE-FO. Our formulation justifies the basic assumptions behind the design of the GRACE-FO mission and highlights the importance of achieving nearly circular and nearly identical orbits for the GRACE-FO spacecraft.
  • We present an approach that significantly increases the sensitivity for finding and tracking small and fast near Earth asteroids (NEA's). This approach relies on a combined use of a new generation of high-speed cameras which allow short, high frame-rate exposures of moving objects, effectively "freezing" their motion, and a computationally enhanced implementation of the "shift-and-add" data processing technique that helps to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for detection of NEA's. The SNR of a single short exposure of a dim NEA is insufficient to detect it in one frame, but by computationally searching for an appropriate velocity vector, shifting successive frames relative to each other and then co-adding the shifted frames in post-processing, we synthetically create a long-exposure image as if the telescope were tracking the object. This approach, which we call "synthetic tracking," enhances the familiar shift-and-add technique with the ability to do a wide blind search, detect, and track dim and fast-moving NEA's in near real time. We discuss also how synthetic tracking improves the astrometry of fast moving NEA's. We apply this technique to observations of two known asteroids conducted on the Palomar 200-inch telescope and demonstrate improved SNR and 10-fold improvement of astrometric precision over the traditional long exposure approach. In the past 5 years, about 150 NEA's with absolute magnitudes H=28 (~10 m in size) or fainter have been discovered. With an upgraded version of our camera and a field of view of (28 arcmin)^2 on the Palomar 200-inch telescope, synthetic tracking could allow detecting up to 180 such objects per night, including very small NEAs with sizes down to 7 m.
  • We present a realization of astronomical relativistic reference frames in the solar system and its application to the GRAIL mission. We model the necessary spacetime coordinate transformations for light-trip time computations and address some practical aspects of the implementation of the resulting model. We develop all the relevant relativistic coordinate transformations that are needed to describe the motion of the GRAIL spacecraft and to compute all observable quantities. We take into account major relativistic effects contributing to the dual one-way range observable, which is derived from one-way signal travel times between the two GRAIL spacecraft. We develop a general relativistic model for this fundamental observable of GRAIL, accurate to 1 $\mu$m. We develop and present a relativistic model for another key observable of this experiment, the dual one-way range-rate, accurate to 1 $\mu$m/s. The presented formulation justifies the basic assumptions behind the design of the GRAIL mission. It may also be used to further improve the already impressive results of this lunar gravity recovery experiment after the mission is complete. Finally, we present transformation rules for frequencies and gravitational potentials and their application to GRAIL.
  • Lunar laser ranging (LLR) has made major contributions to our understanding of the Moon's internal structure and the dynamics of the Earth-Moon system. Because of the recent improvements of the ground-based laser ranging facilities, the present LLR measurement accuracy is limited by the retro-reflectors currently on the lunar surface, which are arrays of small corner-cubes. Because of lunar librations, the surfaces of these arrays do not, in general, point directly at the Earth. This effect results in a spread of arrival times, because each cube that comprises the retroreflector is at a slightly different distance from the Earth, leading to the reduced ranging accuracy. Thus, a single, wide aperture corner-cube could have a clear advantage. In addition, after nearly four decades of successful operations the retro-reflectors arrays currently on the Moon started to show performance degradation; as a result, they yield still useful, but much weaker return signals. Thus, fresh and bright instruments on the lunar surface are needed to continue precision LLR measurements. We have developed a new retro-reflector design to enable advanced LLR operations. It is based on a single, hollow corner cube with a large aperture for which preliminary thermal, mechanical, and optical design and analysis have been performed. The new instrument will be able to reach an Earth-Moon range precision of 1-mm in a single pulse while being subjected to significant thermal variations present on the lunar surface, and will have low mass to allow robotic deployment. Here we report on our design results and instrument development effort.
  • We investigate the possibility that the anomalous acceleration of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft is due to the recoil force associated with an anisotropic emission of thermal radiation off the vehicles. To this end, relying on the project and spacecraft design documentation, we constructed a comprehensive finite-element thermal model of the two spacecraft. Then, we numerically solve thermal conduction and radiation equations using the actual flight telemetry as boundary conditions. We use the results of this model to evaluate the effect of the thermal recoil force on the Pioneer 10 spacecraft at various heliocentric distances. We found that the magnitude, temporal behavior, and direction of the resulting thermal acceleration are all similar to the properties of the observed anomaly. As a novel element of our investigation, we develop a parameterized model for the thermal recoil force and estimate the coefficients of this model independently from navigational Doppler data. We find no statistically significant difference between the two estimates and conclude that once the thermal recoil force is properly accounted for, no anomalous acceleration remains.
  • The Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) experiment provides precise observations of the lunar orbit that contribute to a wide range of science investigations. In particular, time series of highly accurate measurements of the distance between the Earth and Moon provide unique information that determine whether, in accordance with the Equivalence Principle (EP), both of these celestial bodies are falling towards the Sun at the same rate, despite their different masses, compositions, and gravitational self-energies. Analyses of precise laser ranges to the Moon continue to provide increasingly stringent limits on any violation of the EP. Current LLR solutions give (-0.8 +/- 1.3) x 10^{-13} for any possible inequality in the ratios of the gravitational and inertial masses for the Earth and Moon, (m_G/m_I)_E - (m_G/m_I)_M. Such an accurate result allows other tests of gravitational theories. Focusing on the tests of the EP, we discuss the existing data and data analysis techniques. The robustness of the LLR solutions is demonstrated with several different approaches to solutions. Additional high accuracy ranges and improvements in the LLR data analysis model will further advance the research of relativistic gravity in the solar system, and will continue to provide highly accurate tests of the Equivalence Principle.
  • We study accelerating relativistic reference frames in Minkowski space-time under the harmonic gauge. It is well-known that the harmonic gauge imposes constraints on the components of the metric tensor and also on the functional form of admissible coordinate transformations. These two sets of constraints are equivalent and represent the dual nature of the harmonic gauge. We explore this duality and show that the harmonic gauge allows presenting an accelerated metric in an elegant form that depends only on two harmonic potentials. It also allows reconstruction of the spatial structure of the post-Galilean coordinate transformation functions relating inertial and accelerating frames. The remaining temporal dependence of these functions together with corresponding equations of motion are determined from dynamical conditions, obtained by constructing the relativistic proper reference frame of an accelerated test particle. In this frame, the effect of external forces acting on the observer is balanced by the fictitious frame-reaction force that is needed to keep the test particle at rest with respect to the frame, conserving its relativistic linear momentum. We find that this approach is sufficient to determine all the terms of the coordinate transformation. The same method is then used to develop the inverse transformations. The resulting post-Galilean coordinate transformations extend the Poincar\'e group on the case of accelerating observers. We present and discuss the resulting coordinate transformations, relativistic equations of motion, and the structure of the metric tensors corresponding to the relativistic reference frames involved.
  • The Pioneer anomaly is a small sunward anomalous acceleration found in the trajectory analysis of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft. As part of the investigation of the effect, analysis of recently recovered Doppler data for both spacecraft has been completed. The presence of a small anomalous acceleration is confirmed using data spans more than twice as long as those that were previously analyzed. We examine the constancy and direction of the Pioneer anomaly, and conclude that: i) the data favor a temporally decaying anomalous acceleration (~2\times 10^{-11} m/s^2/yr) with an over 10% improvement in the residuals compared to a constant acceleration model; ii) although the direction of the acceleration remains imprecisely determined, we find no support in favor of a Sun-pointing direction over the Earth-pointing or along the spin-axis directions, and iii) support for an early "onset" of the acceleration remains weak in the pre-Saturn Pioneer 11 tracking data. We present these new findings and discuss their implications for the nature of the Pioneer anomaly.
  • Phobos Laser Ranging (PLR) is a concept for a space mission designed to advance tests of relativistic gravity in the solar system. PLR's primary objective is to measure the curvature of space around the Sun, represented by the Eddington parameter $\gamma$, with an accuracy of two parts in $10^7$, thereby improving today's best result by two orders of magnitude. Other mission goals include measurements of the time-rate-of-change of the gravitational constant, $G$ and of the gravitational inverse square law at 1.5 AU distances--with up to two orders-of-magnitude improvement for each. The science parameters will be estimated using laser ranging measurements of the distance between an Earth station and an active laser transponder on Phobos capable of reaching mm-level range resolution. A transponder on Phobos sending 0.25 mJ, 10 ps pulses at 1 kHz, and receiving asynchronous 1 kHz pulses from earth via a 12 cm aperture will permit links that even at maximum range will exceed a photon per second. A total measurement precision of 50 ps demands a few hundred photons to average to 1 mm (3.3 ps) range precision. Existing satellite laser ranging (SLR) facilities--with appropriate augmentation--may be able to participate in PLR. Since Phobos' orbital period is about 8 hours, each observatory is guaranteed visibility of the Phobos instrument every Earth day. Given the current technology readiness level, PLR could be started in 2011 for launch in 2016 for 3 years of science operations. We discuss the PLR's science objectives, instrument, and mission design. We also present the details of science simulations performed to support the mission's primary objectives.
  • Radio-metric Doppler tracking data received from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft from heliocentric distances of 20-70 AU has consistently indicated the presence of a small, anomalous, blue-shifted frequency drift uniformly changing with a rate of ~6 x 10^{-9} Hz/s. Ultimately, the drift was interpreted as a constant sunward deceleration of each particular spacecraft at the level of a_P = (8.74 +/- 1.33) x 10^{-10} m/s^2. This apparent violation of the Newton's gravitational inverse-square law has become known as the Pioneer anomaly; the nature of this anomaly remains unexplained. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the physical properties of the anomaly and the conditions that led to its detection and characterization. We review various mechanisms proposed to explain the anomaly and discuss the current state of efforts to determine its nature. A comprehensive new investigation of the anomalous behavior of the two Pioneers has begun recently. The new efforts rely on the much-extended set of radio-metric Doppler data for both spacecraft in conjunction with the newly available complete record of their telemetry files and a large archive of original project documentation. As the new study is yet to report its findings, this review provides the necessary background for the new results to appear in the near future. In particular, we provide a significant amount of information on the design, operations and behavior of the two Pioneers during their entire missions, including descriptions of various data formats and techniques used for their navigation and radio-science data analysis. As most of this information was recovered relatively recently, it was not used in the previous studies of the Pioneer anomaly, but it is critical for the new investigation.
  • Recent experiments have successfully tested Einstein's general theory of relativity to remarkable precision. We discuss recent progress in the tests of relativistic gravity in the solar system and present motivations for the new generation of high-accuracy gravitational experiments. We especially focus on the concepts aiming to probe parametrized-post-Newtonian parameter $\gamma$ and evaluate the discovery potential of the recently proposed experiments.
  • Close planetary flybys are frequently employed as a technique to place spacecraft on extreme solar system trajectories that would otherwise require much larger booster vehicles or may not even be feasible when relying solely on chemical propulsion. The theoretical description of the flybys, referred to as gravity assists, is well established. However, there seems to be a lack of understanding of the physical processes occurring during these dynamical events. Radio-metric tracking data received from a number of spacecraft that experienced an Earth gravity assist indicate the presence of an unexpected energy change that happened during the flyby and cannot be explained by the standard methods of modern astrodynamics. This puzzling behavior of several spacecraft has become known as the flyby anomaly. We present the summary of the recent anomalous observations and discuss possible ways to resolve this puzzle.