• We present the Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) catalog of transiting exoplanets based on searching four years of Kepler time series photometry (Data Release 25, Q1-Q17). The catalog contains 8054 KOIs of which 4034 are planet candidates with periods between 0.25 and 632 days. Of these candidates, 219 are new and include two in multi-planet systems (KOI-82.06 and KOI-2926.05), and ten high-reliability, terrestrial-size, habitable zone candidates. This catalog was created using a tool called the Robovetter which automatically vets the DR25 Threshold Crossing Events (TCEs, Twicken et al. 2016). The Robovetter also vetted simulated data sets and measured how well it was able to separate TCEs caused by noise from those caused by low signal-to-noise transits. We discusses the Robovetter and the metrics it uses to sort TCEs. For orbital periods less than 100 days the Robovetter completeness (the fraction of simulated transits that are determined to be planet candidates) across all observed stars is greater than 85%. For the same period range, the catalog reliability (the fraction of candidates that are not due to instrumental or stellar noise) is greater than 98%. However, for low signal-to-noise candidates between 200 and 500 days around FGK dwarf stars, the Robovetter is 76.7% complete and the catalog is 50.5% reliable. The KOI catalog, the transit fits and all of the simulated data used to characterize this catalog are available at the NASA Exoplanet Archive.
  • Previous radio observations revealed widespread gas-phase methanol (CH$_3$OH) in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) at the Galactic center (GC), but its origin remains unclear. Here, we report the discovery of CH$_3$OH ice toward a star in the CMZ, based on a Subaru $3.4$-$4.0\ \mu$m spectrum, aided by NASA/IRTF $L'$ imaging and $2$-$4\ \mu$m spectra. The star lies $\sim8000$ au away in projection from a massive young stellar object (MYSO). Its observed high CH$_3$OH ice abundance ($17\%\pm3\%$ relative to H$_2$O ice) suggests that the $3.535\ \mu$m CH$_3$OH ice absorption likely arises in the MYSO's extended envelope. However, it is also possible that CH$_3$OH ice forms with a higher abundance in dense clouds within the CMZ, compared to within the disk. Either way, our result implies that gas-phase CH$_3$OH in the CMZ can be largely produced by desorption from icy grains. The high solid CH$_3$OH abundance confirms the prominent $15.4\ \mu$m shoulder absorption observed toward GC MYSOs arises from CO$_2$ ice mixed with CH$_3$OH.
  • We report observations of a possible young transiting planet orbiting a previously known weak-lined T-Tauri star in the 7-10 Myr old Orion-OB1a/25-Ori region. The candidate was found as part of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project. It has a photometric transit period of 0.448413 +- 0.000040 days, and appears in both 2009 and 2010 PTF data. Follow-up low-precision radial velocity (RV) observations and adaptive optics imaging suggest that the star is not an eclipsing binary, and that it is unlikely that a background source is blended with the target and mimicking the observed transit. RV observations with the Hobby-Eberly and Keck telescopes yield an RV that has the same period as the photometric event, but is offset in phase from the transit center by approximately -0.22 periods. The amplitude (half range) of the RV variations is 2.4 km/s and is comparable with the expected RV amplitude that stellar spots could induce. The RV curve is likely dominated by stellar spot modulation and provides an upper limit to the projected companion mass of M_p sin i_orb < 4.8 +- 1.2 M_Jup; when combined with the orbital inclination, i orb, of the candidate planet from modeling of the transit light curve, we find an upper limit on the mass of the planetary candidate of M_p < 5.5 +- 1.4 M_Jup. This limit implies that the planet is orbiting close to, if not inside, its Roche limiting orbital radius, so that it may be undergoing active mass loss and evaporation.
  • We present 10um-35um Spitzer spectra of the interstellar medium in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), the central 210 pc x 60 pc of the Galactic center (GC). We present maps of the CMZ in ionic and H2 emission, covering a more extensive area than earlier spectroscopic surveys in this region. The radial velocities and intensities of ionic lines and H2 suggest that most of the H2 0-0 S(0) emission comes from gas along the line-of-sight, as found by previous work. We compare diagnostic line ratios measured in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) to our data. Previous work shows that forbidden line ratios can distinguish star-forming galaxies from LINERs and AGNs. Our GC line ratios agree with star-forming galaxies and not with LINERs or AGNs.
  • The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project is an experiment within the broader PTF survey, a systematic automated exploration of the sky for optical transients. Taking advantage of the wide field of view available using the PTF camera at the Palomar 48" telescope, 40 nights were dedicated in December 2009-January 2010 to perform continuous high-cadence differential photometry on a single field containing the young (7-10Myr) 25 Ori association. The primary motivation for the project is to search for planets around young stars in this region. The unique data set also provides for much ancillary science. In this first paper we describe the survey and data reduction pipeline, and present initial results from an inspection of the most clearly varying stars relating to two of the ancillary science objectives: detection of eclipsing binaries and young stellar objects. We find 82 new eclipsing binary systems, 9 of which we are candidate 25 Ori- or Orion OB1a-association members. Of these, 2 are potential young W UMa type systems. We report on the possible low-mass (M-dwarf primary) eclipsing systems in the sample, which include 6 of the candidate young systems. 45 of the binary systems are close (mainly contact) systems; one shows an orbital period among the shortest known for W UMa binaries, at 0.2156509 \pm 0.0000071d, with flat-bottomed primary eclipses, and a derived distance consistent with membership in the general Orion association. One of the candidate young systems presents an unusual light curve, perhaps representing a semi-detached binary system with an inflated low-mass primary or a star with a warped disk, and may represent an additional young Orion member. Finally, we identify 14 probable new classical T-Tauri stars in our data, along with one previously known (CVSO 35) and one previously reported as a candidate weak-line T-Tauri star (SDSS J052700.12+010136.8).
  • The Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey (TERMS) conducts radial velocity and photometric monitoring of known exoplanets in order to refine planetary orbits and predictions of possible transit times. This effort is primarily directed towards planets not known to transit, but a small sample of our targets consist of known transiting systems. Here we present precision photometry for 6 WASP planets acquired during their transit windows. We perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis for each planet and combine these data with previous measurements to redetermine the period and ephemerides for these planets. These observations provide recent mid-transit times which are useful for scheduling future observations. Our results improve the ephemerides of WASP-4b, WASP-5b and WASP-6b and reduce the uncertainties on the mid-transit time for WASP-29b. We also confirm the orbital, stellar and planetary parameters of all 6 systems.
  • We present results from our spectroscopic study, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to identify massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Galactic Center (GC). Our sample of 107 YSO candidates was selected based on IRAC colors from the high spatial resolution, high sensitivity Spitzer/IRAC images in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), which spans the central ~300 pc region of the Milky Way Galaxy. We obtained IRS spectra over 5um to 35um using both high- and low-resolution IRS modules. We spectroscopically identify massive YSOs by the presence of a 15.4um shoulder on the absorption profile of 15um CO2 ice, suggestive of CO2 ice mixed with CH3OH ice on grains. This 15.4um shoulder is clearly observed in 16 sources and possibly observed in an additional 19 sources. We show that 9 massive YSOs also reveal molecular gas-phase absorption from CO2, C2H2, and/or HCN, which traces warm and dense gas in YSOs. Our results provide the first spectroscopic census of the massive YSO population in the GC. We fit YSO models to the observed spectral energy distributions and find YSO masses of 8 - 23 Msun, which generally agree with the masses derived from observed radio continuum emission. We find that about 50% of photometrically identified YSOs are confirmed with our spectroscopic study. This implies a preliminary star formation rate of ~0.07 Msun/yr at the GC.
  • HD 156846b is a Jovian planet in a highly eccentric orbit (e = 0.85) with a period of 359.55 days. The pericenter passage at a distance of 0.16 AU is nearly aligned to our line of sight, offering an enhanced transit probability of 5.4% and a potentially rich probe of the dynamics of a cool planetary atmosphere impulsively heated during close approach to a bright star (V = 6.5). We present new radial velocity (RV) and photometric measurements of this star as part of the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey (TERMS). The RV measurements from Keck-HIRES reduce the predicted transit time uncertainty to 20 minutes, an order of magnitude improvement over the ephemeris from the discovery paper. We photometrically monitored a predicted transit window under relatively poor photometric conditions, from which our non-detection does not rule out a transiting geometry. We also present photometry that demonstrates stability at the millimag level over its rotational timescale.
  • We present a variability analysis of the early-release first quarter of data publicly released by the Kepler project. Using the stellar parameters from the Kepler Input Catalog, we have separated the sample into 129,000 dwarfs and 17,000 giants, and further sub-divided the luminosity classes into temperature bins corresponding approximately to the spectral classes A, F, G, K, and M. Utilizing the inherent sampling and time baseline of the public dataset (30 minute sampling and 33.5 day baseline), we have explored the variability of the stellar sample. The overall variability rate of the dwarfs is 25% for the entire sample, but can reach 100% for the brightest groups of stars in the sample. G-dwarfs are found to be the most stable with a dispersion floor of $\sigma \sim 0.04$ mmag. At the precision of Kepler, $>95$% of the giant stars are variable with a noise floor of $\sim 0.1$ mmag, 0.3 mmag, and 10 mmag for the G-giants, K-giants, and M-giants, respectively. The photometric dispersion of the giants is consistent with acoustic variations of the photosphere; the photometrically-derived predicted radial velocity distribution for the K-giants is in agreement with the measured radial velocity distribution. We have also briefly explored the variability fraction as a function of dataset baseline (1 - 33 days), at the native 30-minute sampling of the public Kepler data. To within the limitations of the data, we find that the overall variability fractions increase as the dataset baseline is increased from 1 day to 33 days, in particular for the most variable stars. The lower mass M-dwarf, K-dwarf, G-dwarf stars increase their variability more significantly than the higher mass F-dwarf and A-dwarf stars as the time-baseline is increased, indicating that the variability of the lower mass stars is mostly characterized by timescales of weeks whi...astroph will not allow longer abstract!
  • We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO2 (15.0um), C2H2 (13.7um) and HCN (14.0um). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15um CO2 ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH3OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observations demonstrate the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.
  • We have obtained Spitzer/IRAC observations of the central 2.0 x 1.4 degrees (~280 x 200 pc) of the Galaxy at 3.6-8.0 microns. A point source catalog of 1,065,565 objects is presented. The catalog includes magnitudes for the point sources at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns, as well as JHK photometry from 2MASS. The point source catalog is confusion limited with average limits of 12.4, 12.1, 11.7, and 11.2 magnitudes for [3.6], [4.5], [5.8], and [8.0], respectively. We find that the confusion limits are spatially variable because of stellar surface density, background surface brightness level, and extinction variations across the survey region. The overall distribution of point source density with Galactic latitude and longitude is essentially constant, but structure does appear when sources of different magnitude ranges are selected. Bright stars show a steep decreasing gradient with Galactic latitude, and a slow decreasing gradient with Galactic longitude, with a peak at the position of the Galactic center. From IRAC color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we conclude that most of the point sources in our catalog have IRAC magnitudes and colors characteristic of red giant and AGB stars.
  • We make use of new near and mid-IR photometry of the Pleiades cluster in order to help identify proposed cluster members. We also use the new photometry with previously published photometry to define the single-star main sequence locus at the age of the Pleiades in a variety of color-magnitude planes. The new near and mid-IR photometry extend effectively two magnitudes deeper than the 2MASS All-Sky Point Source catalog, and hence allow us to select a new set of candidate very low mass and sub-stellar mass members of the Pleiades in the central square degree of the cluster. We identify 42 new candidate members fainter than Ks =14 (corresponding to 0.1 Mo). These candidate members should eventually allow a better estimate of the cluster mass function to be made down to of order 0.04 solar masses. We also use new IRAC data, in particular the images obtained at 8 um, in order to comment briefly on interstellar dust in and near the Pleiades. We confirm, as expected, that -- with one exception -- a sample of low mass stars recently identified as having 24 um excesses due to debris disks do not have significant excesses at IRAC wavelengths. However, evidence is also presented that several of the Pleiades high mass stars are found to be impacting with local condensations of the molecular cloud that is passing through the Pleiades at the current epoch.
  • We present results of Chandra observations of two flanking fields (FF) in Orion, outside the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). The observations were taken with the ACIS-I camera with an exposure time of about 48 ks each field. We present a catalog of 417 sources, which includes X-ray luminosity, optical and infrared photometry and X-ray variability information. We have found 91 variable sources, 33 of which have a flare-like light curve, and 11 of which have a pattern of a steady increase or decrease over a 10 hour period. The optical and infrared photometry for the stars identified as X-ray sources are consistent with most of these objects being pre-main sequence stars with ages younger than 10 Myr. We present evidence for an age difference among the X-ray selected samples of NGC 2264, Orion FF, and ONC, with NGC 2264 being the oldest, and ONC being the youngest.
  • We present results of a Chandra observation of a field in NGC 2264. The observations were taken with the ACIS-I camera with an exposure time of 48.1 ks. We present a catalog of 263 sources, which includes X-ray luminosity, optical and infrared photometry and X-ray variability information. We found 41 variable sources, 14 of which have a flare-like light curve, and 2 of which have a pattern of a steady increase or decrease over a 10 hour period. The optical and infrared photometry for the stars identified as X-ray sources are consistent with most of these objects being pre-main sequence stars with ages younger than 3 Myr.
  • We present the iron abundance and abundance ratios for 18 elements with respect to Fe in a sample of stars with a wide range in luminosity from luminous giants to stars near the turnoff in the globular cluster M5. The analyzed spectra, obtained with HIRES at the Keck Observatory, are of high dispersion (R=35,000). We find that the neutron capture, the iron peak and the alpha-element abundance ratios show no trend with Teff, and low scatter around the mean between the top of the RGB and near the main sequence turnoff To within the precision of the measurements (~0.1 dex), gravitationally induced heavy element diffusion does not appear to be present among the stars near the main sequence turnoff studied here. Our work and other recent studies suggest that heavy element diffusion is inhibited in the surface layers of metal poor stars. Differences in the Na abundance from star to star which extend to the main sequence turnoff are detected in our sample in M5. The anti-correlation between O and Na abundances, observed in other metal poor globular clusters, is not detected in our sample, but it may be hidden among stars with only upper limits for their O abundances. Overall the abundance ratios of M5 appear very similar to those of M71, with the possible exception of the neutron capture element Ba, where we argue that the apparent difference may be due to difficulties in the analysis. As in M71, the alpha-elements Mg, Ca, Si and Ti are overabundant relative to Fe. The results of our abundance analysis of 25 stars in M5 provide further evidence of abundance variations among specific light elements at unexpectedly low luminosities, which cannot be explained by our current understanding of stellar evolution.
  • We announce the initial release of data from the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey, a BVRJHK imaging survey of a well-defined sample of 205 bright, nearby spiral galaxies. We present H-band morphological classification on the Hubble sequence for the OSU Survey sample. We compare the H-band classification to B-band classification from our own images and from standard galaxy catalogs. Our B-band classifications match well with those of the standard catalogs. On average, galaxies with optical classifications from Sa through Scd appear about one T-type earlier in the H-band than in the B-band, but with large scatter. This result does not support recent claims made in the literature that the optical and near-IR morphologies of spiral galaxies are uncorrelated. We present detailed descriptions of the H-band morphologies of our entire sample, as well as B- and H-band images for a set of 17 galaxies chosen as type examples, and BRH color-composite images of six galaxies chosen to demonstrate the range in morphological variation as a function of wavelength. Data from the survey are accessible at http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~survey/
  • We present abundance ratios for 23 elements with respect to Fe in a sample of stars with a wide range in luminosity, from luminous giants to stars near the turnoff, in the globular cluster M71. The analyzed spectra, obtained with HIRES at the Keck Observatory, are of high dispersion (R=35,000). We find that the neutron capture, the iron peak and the alpha-element abundance ratios show no trend with Teff, and low scatter around the mean between the top of the RGB and near the main sequence turnoff. The alpha-elements Mg, Ca, Si and Ti are overabundant relative to Fe. The anti-correlation between O and Na abundances, observed in other metal poor globular clusters, is detected in our sample and extends to the main sequence. A statistically significant correlation between Al and Na abundances is observed among the M71 stars in our sample, extending to Mv = +1.8, fainter than the luminosity of the RGB bump in M5. Lithium is varying, as expected, and Zr may be varying from star to star as well. M71 appears to have abundance ratios very similar to M5 whose bright giants were studied by Ivans et al. (2001), but seems to have a smaller amplitude of star-to-star variations at a given luminosity, as might be expected from its higher metallicity. The results of our abundance analysis of 25 stars in M71 provide sufficient evidence of abundance variations at unexpectedly low luminosities to rule out the mixing scenario. Either alone or, even more powerfully, combined with other recent studies of C and N abundances in M71 stars, the existence of such abundance variations cannot be reproduced within the context of our current understanding of stellar evolution.
  • This paper was heavily modified and resubmitted as astro-ph/0111572.
  • We present [Ffe/H] abundance results that involve a sample of stars with a wide range in luminosity from luminous giants to stars near the turnoff in a globular cluster. Our sample of 25 stars in M71 includes 10 giant stars more luminous than the RHB, 3 horizontal branch stars, 9 giant stars less luminous than the RHB, and 3 stars near the turnoff. We analyzed both Fe I and Fe II lines in high dispersion spectra observed with HIRES at the W. M. Keck Observatory. We find that the [Fe/H] abundances from both Fe I and Fe II lines agree with each other and with earlier determinations. Also the [Fe/H] obtained from Fe I and Fe II lines is constant within the rather small uncertainties for this group of stars over the full range in Teff and luminosity, suggesting that NLTE effects are negligible in our iron abundance determination. In this globular cluster, there is no difference among the mean [Fe/H] of giant stars located at or above the RHB, RHB stars, giant stars located below the RHB and stars near the turnoff.
  • We present K-band spectra of more than 110 M giants in Galactic bulge fields interior to -4 degrees and as close as 0.2 degrees of the Galactic Center. From the equivalent widths of three features in these spectra, EW(Na),EW(Ca), and EW(CO) we calculate [Fe/H] for the stars with a calibration derived from globular clusters Stephens et al (2000). The mean [Fe/H] for each field is in good agreement with the results from Frogel et al. (1999) based on the slope of the giant branch method. We find no evidence for a metallicity gradient along the minor or major axes of the inner bulge (R < 0.6 kpc). A metallicity gradient along the minor axis, found earlier, arises when fields located at larger galactic radius are included. However, these more distant fields are located outside of the infrared bulge defined by the COBE/DIRBE observations. We compute the [Fe/H] distribution for the inner bulge and find a mean value of -0.21 dex with a full width dispersion of 0.30 dex, close to the values found for Baade's Window (BW) by Sadler et al. (1996) and to a theoretical prediction for a bulge formed by dissipative collapse Molla et al (2000).
  • We present measurements of [Fe/H] for six M supergiant stars and three giant stars within 0.5 pc of the Galactic Center (GC) and one M supergiant star within 30 pc of the GC. The results are based on high-resolution (lambda / Delta lambda =40,000) K-band spectra, taken with CSHELL at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility.We determine the iron abundance by detailed abundance analysis,performed with the spectral synthesis program MOOG.The mean [Fe/H] of the GC stars is determined to be near solar,[Fe/H] = +0.12 $\pm$ 0.22. Our analysis is a differential analysis, as we have observed and applied the same analysis technique to eleven cool, luminous stars in the solar neighborhood with similar temperatures and luminosities as the GC stars. The mean [Fe/H] of the solar neighborhood comparison stars, [Fe/H] = +0.03 $\pm$ 0.16, is similar to that of the GC stars. The width of the GC [Fe/H] distribution is found to be narrower than the width of the [Fe/H] distribution of Baade's Window in the bulge but consistent with the width of the [Fe/H] distribution of giant and supergiant stars in the solar neighborhood.
  • We show that observations by Backer and collaborators over the past two decades constrain the time derivative of the proper motion of Sgr A* to be less than 0.14 mas yr^{-2}. Using this result and a preliminary measurement by Eckart and Genzel of sigma ~500 kms for the velocity dispersion of the star cluster within 0.2" of Sgr A*, we derive the following implications. First, if the nuclear star cluster is dominated by a massive black hole, then either Sgr A* is that black hole or it orbits the black hole with a radius less than 3 AU. Second, even if the star cluster does not contain a massive black hole, Sgr A* is constrained to move slower than 20 kms (1 sigma) relative to the center of mass of the cluster. The Galactocentric distance is therefore R_0=7.5 +/- 0.7 kpc, independent of the nature of Sgr A*. These error bars could be substantially reduced by future observations. If they are, it will also be possible to probe the motion of the nuclear star cluster relative to the center of mass of the Galaxy at the ~4 kms level.
  • We describe a technique that uses radial color gradients in disk galaxies to detect the presence of bulk non-circular motion or elliptical orbits. In a disk galaxy with both a radial color gradient and non-circular motion, isochromes or iso-color contours should follow the shape of closed stellar orbits, and the ellipticity of the isophotes should vary as a function of wavelength. A difference in the ellipticity of isochromes and the isophotes can be used to detect the presence of non-circular motion. A model galaxy is constructed which demonstrates this phenomenon. The difference between isochrome and isophote ellipticity is directly related to the ellipticity of the potential. This provides a new way to measure the ellipticity of the dark matter in the outer parts of galaxies. As an example, we apply this technique to two dwarf galaxies NGC 1800 and NGC 7764. We detect a bar in NGC 1800 which has only previously been suggested from the HI velocity field. In NGC 7764 there is no color gradient along its bar so we cannot detect non-circular motion in this region; however ellipticities observed in a star forming ring at the end of the bar are consistent with this ring being located near the corotation resonance.
  • We present visible and near-infrared images of the amorphous dwarf galaxy NGC 1705 in the $B$, $V$, $R$, $J$, $H$, and $K$ bands. Optical and near infrared colors in the galaxy are consistent with a composite population with colors similar to those of the bluest Sc nuclei. The contribution of young stars to the disk population of the galaxy decreases outwards from the center. In the near infrared images we detect three unresolved point sources, two of which have colors and luminosities comparable to intermediate age LMC clusters.