• We address small volume-fraction asymptotic properties of a nonlocal isoperimetric functional with a confinement term, derived as the sharp interface limit of a variational model for self-assembly of diblock copolymers under confinement by nanoparticle inclusion. We introduce a small parameter $\eta$ to represent the size of the domains of the minority phase, and study the resulting droplet regime as $\eta\to 0$. By considering confinement densities which are spatially variable and attain a nondegenerate maximum, we present a two-stage asymptotic analysis wherein a separation of length scales is captured due to competition between the nonlocal repulsive and confining attractive effects in the energy. A key role is played by a parameter $M$ which gives the total volume of the droplets at order $\eta^3$ and its relation to existence and non-existence of Gamow's Liquid Drop model on $\mathbb{R}^3$. For large values of $M$, the minority phase splits into several droplets at an intermediate scale $\eta^{1/3}$, while for small $M$ minimizers form a single droplet converging to the maximum of the confinement density.
  • We consider a variant of Gamow's liquid drop model, with a general repulsive Riesz kernel and a long-range attractive background potential with weight $Z$. The addition of the background potential acts as a regularization for the liquid drop model in that it restores the existence of minimizers for arbitrary mass. We consider the regime of small $Z$ and characterize the structure of minimizers in the limit $Z\to 0$ by means of a sharp asymptotic expansion of the energy. In the process of studying this limit we characterize all minimizing sequences for the Gamow model in terms of "generalized minimizers".
  • We consider a nematic liquid crystal occupying the exterior region in R^3 outside of a spherical particle, with radial strong anchoring. Within the context of the Landau-de Gennes theory, we study minimizers subject to a strong external field, modelled by an additional term which favors nematic alignment parallel to the field. When the external field is high enough we obtain a scaling law for the energy. The energy scale corresponds to minimizers concentrating their energy in a boundary layer around the particle, with quadrupolar symmetry. This suggests the presence of a Saturn ring defect around the particle, rather than a dipolar director field typical of a point defect.
  • We prove that both the liquid drop model in $\mathbb{R}^3$ with an attractive background nucleus and the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-von Weizs\"{a}cker (TFDW) model attain their ground-states \emph{for all} masses as long as the external potential $V(x)$ in these models is of long range, that is, it decays slower than Newtonian (e.g., $V(x)\gg |x|^{-1}$ for large $|x|$.) For the TFDW model we adapt classical concentration-compactness arguments by Lions, whereas for the liquid drop model with background attraction we utilize a recent compactness result for sets of finite perimeter by Frank and Lieb.
  • We identify the $\Gamma$-limit of a nanoparticle-polymer model as the number of particles goes to infinity and as the size of the particles and the phase transition thickness of the polymer phases approach zero. The limiting energy consists of two terms: the perimeter of the interface separating the phases and a penalization term related to the density distribution of the infinitely many small nanoparticles. We prove that local minimizers of the limiting energy admit regular phase boundaries and derive necessary conditions of local minimality via the first variation. Finally we discuss possible critical and minimizing patterns in two dimensions and how these patterns vary from global minimizers of the purely local isoperimetric problem.
  • We analyze a non-standard isoperimetric problem in the plane associated with a metric having degenerate conformal factor at two points. Under certain assumptions on the conformal factor, we establish the existence of curves of least length under a constraint associated with enclosed Euclidean area. As a motivation for and application of this isoperimetric problem, we identify these isoperimetric curves, appropriately parametrized, as traveling wave solutions to a bi-stable Hamiltonian system of PDE's. We also determine the existence of a maximal propagation speed for these traveling waves through an explicit upper bound depending on the conformal factor.
  • We consider energy minimizing configurations of a nematic liquid crystal around a spherical colloid particle, in the context of the Landau-de Gennes model. The nematic is assumed to occupy the exterior of a ball of radius r_0, satisfy homeotropic weak anchoring at the surface of the colloid, and approach a uniform uniaxial state at infinity. We study the minimizers in two different limiting regimes: for balls which are small compared to the characteristic length scale r_0<<L, and for large balls, r_0>>L. The relationship between the radius and the anchoring strength W is also relevant. For small balls we obtain a limiting quadrupolar configuration, with a "Saturn ring" defect for relatively strong anchoring, corresponding to an exchange of eigenvalues of the Q-tensor. In the limit of very large balls we obtain an axisymmetric minimizer of the Oseen-Frank energy, and a dipole configuration with exactly one point defect is obtained.
  • We study vortices in p-wave superconductors in a Ginzburg-Landau setting. The state of the superconductor is described by a pair of complex wave functions, and the p-wave symmetric energy functional couples these in both the kinetic (gradient) and potential energy terms, giving rise to systems of partial differential equations which are nonlinear and coupled in their second derivative terms. We prove the existence of energy minimizing solutions in bounded domains $\Omega\subset\mathbb R^2$, and consider the existence and qualitative properties (such as the asymptotic behavior) of equivariant solutions defined in all of $\mathbb R^2$. The coupling of the equations at highest order changes the nature of the solutions, and many of the usual properties of classical Ginzburg-Landau vortices either do not hold for the p-wave solutions or are not immediately evident.
  • We study the weak anchoring condition for nematic liquid crystals in the context of the Landau-De Gennes model. We restrict our attention to two dimensional samples and to nematic director fields lying in the plane, for which the Landau-De Gennes energy reduces to the Ginzburg--Landau functional, and the weak anchoring condition is realized via a penalized boundary term in the energy. We study the singular limit as the length scale parameter $\varepsilon\to 0$, assuming the weak anchoring parameter $\lambda=\lambda(\varepsilon)\to\infty$ at a prescribed rate. We also consider a specific example of a bulk nematic liquid crystal with an included oil droplet and derive a precise description of the defect locations for this situation, for $\lambda(\varepsilon)=K\varepsilon^{-\alpha}$ with $\alpha\in (0,1]$. We show that defects lie on the weak anchoring boundary for $\alpha\in (0,\frac12)$, or for $\alpha=\frac12$ and $K$ small, but they occur inside the bulk domain $\Omega$ for $\alpha>\frac12$ or $\alpha=\frac12$ with $K$ large.
  • A thorough study of domain wall solutions in coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations on the real line is carried out including existence of these solutions; their spectral and nonlinear stability; their persistence and stability under a small localized potential. The proof of existence is variational and is presented in a general framework: we show that the domain wall solutions are energy minimizing within a class of vector-valued functions with nontrivial conditions at infinity. The admissible energy functionals include those corresponding to coupled Gross--Pitaevskii equations, arising in modeling of Bose-Einstein condensates. The results on spectral and nonlinear stability follow from properties of the linearized operator about the domain wall. The methods apply to many systems of interest and integrability is not germane to our analysis. Finally, sufficient conditions for persistence and stability of domain wall solutions are obtained to show that stable pinning occurs near maxima of the potential, thus giving rigorous justification to earlier results in the physics literature.
  • We study Ginzburg-Landau equations for a complex vector order parameter. We consider the Dirichlet problem in the disk in the plane with a symmetric, degree-one boundary condition, and study its stability, in the sense of the spectrum of the second variation of the energy. We find that the stability of the degree-one equivariant solution depends on both the Ginzburg-Landau parameter as well as the sign of the interaction term in the energy.
  • We study Ginzburg--Landau equations for a complex vector order parameter Psi=(psi_+,psi_-). We consider symmetric (equivariant) vortex solutions in the plane R^2 with given degrees n_\pm, and prove existence, uniqueness, and asymptotic behavior of solutions for large r. We also consider the monotonicity properties of solutions, and exhibit parameter ranges in which both vortex profiles |psi_+|, |psi_i| are monotone, as well as parameter regimes where one component is non-monotone. The qualitative results are obtained by means of a sub- and supersolution construction and a comparison theorem for elliptic systems.
  • We study the structure of vortex solutions in a Ginzburg-Landau system for two complex valued order parameters. We consider the Dirichlet problem in the disk in R^2 with symmetric, degree-one boundary condition, as well as the associated degree-one entire solutions in all of R^2. Each problem has degree-one equivariant solutions with radially symmetric profile vanishing at the origin, of the same form as the unique (complex scalar) Ginzburg-Landau minimizer. We find that there is a range of parameters for which these equivariant solutions are the unique locally energy minimizing solutions for the coupled system. Surprisingly, there is also a parameter regime in which the equivariant solutions are unstable, and minimizers must vanish separately in each component of the order parameter.
  • We consider singular limits of the three-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau functional for a superconductor with thin-film geometry, in a constant external magnetic field. The superconducting domain has characteristic thickness on the scale $\eps>0$, and we consider the simultaneous limit as the thickness $\eps\rightarrow 0$ and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter $\kappa\rightarrow\infty$. We assume that the applied field is strong (on the order of $\eps^{-1}$ in magnitude) in its components tangential to the film domain, and of order $\log\kappa$ in its dependence on $\kappa$. We prove that the Ginzburg-Landau energy $\Gamma$-converges to an energy associated with a two-obstacle problem, posed on the planar domain which supports the thin film. The same limit is obtained regardless of the relationship between $\eps$ and $\kappa$ in the limit. Two illustrative examples are presented, each of which demonstrating how the curvature of the film can induce the presence of both (positively oriented) vortices and (negatively oriented) antivortices coexisting in a global minimizer of the energy.
  • We study minimizers of the Lawrence--Doniach energy, which describes equilibrium states of superconductors with layered structure, assuming Floquet-periodic boundary conditions. Specifically, we consider the effect of a constant magnetic field applied obliquely to the superconducting planes in the limit as both the layer spacing $s\to 0$ and the Ginzburg--Landau parameter $\kappa=\eps^{-1}\to\infty$, under the hypotheses that $s=\eps^\alpha$ with $0<\alpha<1$. By deriving sharp matching upper and lower bounds on the energy of minimizers, we determine the lower critical field and the orientation of the flux lattice, to leading order in the parameter $\eps$. To leading order, the induced field is characterized by a convex minimization problem in $\RR^3$. We observe a ``flux lock-in transition'', in which flux lines are pinned to the horizontal direction for applied fields of small inclination, and which is not present in minimizers of the anisotropic Ginzburg--Landau model. The energy profile we obtain suggests the presence of ``staircase vortices'', which have been described qualitatively in the physics literature.
  • In this work, we study thin-film limits of the full three-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau model for a superconductor in an applied magnetic field oriented obliquely to the film surface. We obtain Gamma-convergence results in several regimes, determined by the asymptotic ratio between the magnitude of the parallel applied magnetic field and the thickness of the film. Depending on the regime, we show that there may be a decrease in the density of Cooper pairs. We also show that in the case of variable thickness of the film, its geometry will affect the effective applied magnetic field, thus influencing the position of vortices.
  • We study the variational convergence of a family of two-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau functionals arising in the study of superfluidity or thin-film superconductivity, as the Ginzburg-Landau parameter epsilon tends to 0. In this regime and for large enough applied rotations (for superfluids) or magnetic fields (for superconductors), the minimizers acquire quantized point singularities (vortices). We focus on situations in which an unbounded number of vortices accumulate along a prescribed Jordan curve or a simple arc in the domain. This is known to occur in a circular annulus under uniform rotation, or in a simply connected domain with an appropriately chosen rotational vector field. We prove that, suitably normalized, the energy functionals Gamma-converge to a classical energy from potential theory. Applied to global minimizers, our results describe the limiting distribution of vortices along the curve in terms of Green equilibrium measures.