• Computer networks have become a critical infrastructure. In fact, networks should not only meet strict requirements in terms of correctness, availability, and performance, but they should also be very flexible and support fast updates, e.g., due to policy changes, increasing traffic, or failures. This paper presents a structured survey of mechanism and protocols to update computer networks in a fast and consistent manner. In particular, we identify and discuss the different desirable consistency properties that should be provided throughout a network update, the algorithmic techniques which are needed to meet these consistency properties, and the implications on the speed and costs at which updates can be performed. We also explain the relationship between consistent network update problems and classic algorithmic optimization ones. While our survey is mainly motivated by the advent of Software-Defined Networks (SDNs) and their primary need for correct and efficient update techniques, the fundamental underlying problems are not new, and we provide a historical perspective of the subject as well.
  • The Virtual Network Embedding Problem (VNEP) captures the essence of many resource allocation problems of today's infrastructure providers, which offer their physical computation and networking resources to customers. Customers request resources in the form of Virtual Networks, i.e. as a directed graph which specifies computational requirements at the nodes and communication requirements on the edges. An embedding of a Virtual Network on the shared physical infrastructure is the joint mapping of (virtual) nodes to physical servers together with the mapping of (virtual) edges onto paths in the physical network connecting the respective servers. This work initiates the study of approximation algorithms for the VNEP. Concretely, we study the offline setting with admission control: given multiple request graphs the task is to embed the most profitable subset while not exceeding resource capacities. Our approximation is based on the randomized rounding of Linear Programming (LP) solutions. Interestingly, we uncover that the standard LP formulation for the VNEP exhibits an inherent structural deficit when considering general virtual network topologies: its solutions cannot be decomposed into valid embeddings. In turn, focusing on the class of cactus request graphs, we devise a novel LP formulation, whose solutions can be decomposed into convex combinations of valid embedding. Proving performance guarantees of our rounding scheme, we obtain the first approximation algorithm for the VNEP in the resource augmentation model. We propose two types of rounding heuristics and evaluate their performance in an extensive computational study. Our results indicate that randomized rounding can yield good solutions (even without augmentations). Specifically, heuristic rounding achieves 73.8% of the baseline's profit, while not exceeding capacities.
  • We initiate the study of a fundamental combinatorial problem: Given a capacitated graph $G=(V,E)$, find a shortest walk ("route") from a source $s\in V$ to a destination $t\in V$ that includes all vertices specified by a set $\mathscr{W}\subseteq V$: the \emph{waypoints}. This waypoint routing problem finds immediate applications in the context of modern networked distributed systems. Our main contribution is an exact polynomial-time algorithm for graphs of bounded treewidth. We also show that if the number of waypoints is logarithmically bounded, exact polynomial-time algorithms exist even for general graphs. Our two algorithms provide an almost complete characterization of what can be solved exactly in polynomial-time: we show that more general problems (e.g., on grid graphs of maximum degree 3, with slightly more waypoints) are computationally intractable.
  • Many resource allocation problems in the cloud can be described as a basic Virtual Network Embedding Problem (VNEP): the problem of finding a mapping of a request graph (describing a workload) onto a substrate graph (describing the physical infrastructure). Applications range from mapping testbeds (from where the problem originated), over the embedding of batch-processing workloads (virtual clusters) to the embedding of service function chains. The different applications come with their own specific requirements and constraints, including node mapping constraints, routing policies, and latency constraints. While the VNEP has been studied intensively over the last years, complexity results are only known for specific models and we lack a comprehensive understanding of its hardness. This paper charts the complexity landscape of the VNEP by providing a systematic analysis of the hardness of a wide range of VNEP variants, using a unifying and rigorous proof framework. In particular, we show that the problem of finding a feasible embedding is NP-complete in general, and, hence, the VNEP cannot be approximated under any objective, unless P=NP holds. Importantly, we derive NP-completeness results also for finding approximate embeddings, which may violate, e.g., capacity constraints by certain factors. Lastly, we prove that our results still pertain when restricting the request graphs to planar or degree-bounded graphs.
  • Many resource allocation problems in the cloud can be described as a basic Virtual Network Embedding Problem (VNEP): finding mappings of request graphs (describing the workloads) onto a substrate graph (describing the physical infrastructure). In the offline setting, the two natural objectives are profit maximization, i.e., embedding a maximal number of request graphs subject to the resource constraints, and cost minimization, i.e., embedding all requests at minimal overall cost. The VNEP can be seen as a generalization of classic routing and call admission problems, in which requests are arbitrary graphs whose communication endpoints are not fixed. Due to its applications, the problem has been studied intensively in the networking community. However, the underlying algorithmic problem is hardly understood. This paper presents the first fixed-parameter tractable approximation algorithms for the VNEP. Our algorithms are based on randomized rounding. Due to the flexible mapping options and the arbitrary request graph topologies, we show that a novel linear program formulation is required. Only using this novel formulation the computation of convex combinations of valid mappings is enabled, as the formulation needs to account for the structure of the request graphs. Accordingly, to capture the structure of request graphs, we introduce the graph-theoretic notion of extraction orders and extraction width and show that our algorithms have exponential runtime in the request graphs' maximal width. Hence, for request graphs of fixed extraction width, we obtain the first polynomial-time approximations. Studying the new notion of extraction orders we show that (i) computing extraction orders of minimal width is NP-hard and (ii) that computing decomposable LP solutions is in general NP-hard, even when restricting request graphs to planar ones.
  • Software-defined networking is considered a promising new paradigm, enabling more reliable and formally verifiable communication networks. However, this paper shows that the separation of the control plane from the data plane, which lies at the heart of Software-Defined Networks (SDNs), introduces a new vulnerability which we call \emph{teleportation}. An attacker (e.g., a malicious switch in the data plane or a host connected to the network) can use teleportation to transmit information via the control plane and bypass critical network functions in the data plane (e.g., a firewall), and to violate security policies as well as logical and even physical separations. This paper characterizes the design space for teleportation attacks theoretically, and then identifies four different teleportation techniques. We demonstrate and discuss how these techniques can be exploited for different attacks (e.g., exfiltrating confidential data at high rates), and also initiate the discussion of possible countermeasures. Generally, and given today's trend toward more intent-based networking, we believe that our findings are relevant beyond the use cases considered in this paper.
  • Modern computer networks support interesting new routing models in which traffic flows from a source s to a destination t can be flexibly steered through a sequence of waypoints, such as (hardware) middleboxes or (virtualized) network functions, to create innovative network services like service chains or segment routing. While the benefits and technological challenges of providing such routing models have been articulated and studied intensively over the last years, much less is known about the underlying algorithmic traffic routing problems. This paper shows that the waypoint routing problem features a deep combinatorial structure, and we establish interesting connections to several classic graph theoretical problems. We find that the difficulty of the waypoint routing problem depends on the specific setting, and chart a comprehensive landscape of the computational complexity. In particular, we derive several NP-hardness results, but we also demonstrate that exact polynomial-time algorithms exist for a wide range of practically relevant scenarios.
  • Distributed evacuation of mobile robots is a recent development. We consider the evacuation problem of two robots which are initially located at the center of a unit disk. Both the robots have to evacuate the disk through the exits situated on the perimeter of the disk at an unknown location. The distance between two exits along the perimeter $d$ is given. We consider two different communication models. First, in the wireless model, the robots can send a message to each other over a long distance. Second, in face-to-face communication model, the robots can exchange information with each other only when they touch each other. The objective of the evacuation problem is to design an algorithm which minimizes the evacuation time of both the robots. For the wireless communication model, we propose a generic algorithm for two robots moving to two points on the perimeter with an initial separation of $\zeta \leq d$. We also investigate evacuation problem for both unlabeled and labeled exits in the wireless communication model. For the face-to-face communication model, we propose two different algorithms for $\zeta =0$ and $\zeta =d$ for unlabeled exits. We also propose a generic algorithm for $\zeta \leq d$ for labeled exits. We provide lower bounds corresponding to different $d$ values in the face-to-face communication model. We evaluate the performance our algorithms with simulation for both of the communication models.
  • Changing a given configuration in a graph into another one is known as a re- configuration problem. Such problems have recently received much interest in the context of algorithmic graph theory. We initiate the theoretical study of the following reconfiguration problem: How to reroute $k$ unsplittable flows of a certain demand in a capacitated network from their current paths to their respective new paths, in a congestion-free manner? This problem finds immediate applications, e.g., in traffic engineering in computer networks. We show that the problem is generally NP-hard already for $k = 2$ flows, which motivates us to study rerouting on a most basic class of flow graphs, namely DAGs. Interestingly, we find that for general $k$, deciding whether an unsplittable multi-commodity flow rerouting schedule exists, is NP-hard even on DAGs. Both NP-hardness proofs are non-trivial. Our main contribution is a polynomial-time (fixed parameter tractable) algorithm to solve the route update problem for a bounded number of flows on DAGs. At the heart of our algorithm lies a novel decomposition of the flow network that allows us to express and resolve reconfiguration dependencies among flows.
  • The virtualization and softwarization of modern computer networks introduces interesting new opportunities for a more flexible placement of network functions and middleboxes (firewalls, proxies, traffic optimizers, virtual switches, etc.). This paper studies approximation algorithms for the incremental deployment of a minimum number of middleboxes at optimal locations, such that capacity constraints at the middleboxes and length constraints on the communication routes are respected. Our main contribution is a new, purely combinatorial and rigorous proof for the submodularity of the function maximizing the number of communication requests that can be served by a given set of middleboxes. Our proof allows us to devise a deterministic approximation algorithm which uses an augmenting path approach to compute the submodular function. This algorithm does not require any changes to the locations of existing middleboxes or the preemption of previously served communication pairs when additional middleboxes are deployed, previously accepted communication pairs just can be handed over to another middlebox. It is hence particularly attractive for incremental deployments.We prove that the achieved polynomial-time approximation bound is optimal, unless P = NP. This paper also initiates the study of a weighted problem variant, in which entire groups of nodes need to communicate via a middlebox (e.g., a multiplexer or a shared object), possibly at different rates. We present an LP relaxation and randomized rounding algorithm for this problem, leveraging an interesting connection to scheduling.
  • The Minimum Dominating Set (MDS) problem is one of the most fundamental and challenging problems in distributed computing. While it is well-known that minimum dominating sets cannot be approximated locally on general graphs, over the last years, there has been much progress on computing local approximations on sparse graphs, and in particular planar graphs. In this paper we study distributed and deterministic MDS approximation algorithms for graph classes beyond planar graphs. In particular, we show that existing approximation bounds for planar graphs can be lifted to bounded genus graphs, and present (1) a local constant-time, constant-factor MDS approximation algorithm and (2) a local $\mathcal{O}(\log^*{n})$-time approximation scheme. Our main technical contribution is a new analysis of a slightly modified variant of an existing algorithm by Lenzen et al. Interestingly, unlike existing proofs for planar graphs, our analysis does not rely on direct topological arguments.
  • We currently witness the emergence of interesting new network topologies optimized towards the traffic matrices they serve, such as demand-aware datacenter interconnects (e.g., ProjecToR) and demand-aware overlay networks (e.g., SplayNets). This paper introduces a formal framework and approach to reason about and design such topologies. We leverage a connection between the communication frequency of two nodes and the path length between them in the network, which depends on the entropy of the communication matrix. Our main contribution is a novel robust, yet sparse, family of network topologies which guarantee an expected path length that is proportional to the entropy of the communication patterns.
  • Traditionally, networks such as datacenter interconnects are designed to optimize worst-case performance under arbitrary traffic patterns. Such network designs can however be far from optimal when considering the actual workloads and traffic patterns which they serve. This insight led to the development of demand-aware datacenter interconnects which can be reconfigured depending on the workload. Motivated by these trends, this paper initiates the algorithmic study of demand-aware networks (DANs) designs, and in particular the design of bounded-degree networks. The inputs to the network design problem are a discrete communication request distribution, D, defined over communicating pairs from the node set V , and a bound, d, on the maximum degree. In turn, our objective is to design an (undirected) demand-aware network N = (V,E) of bounded-degree d, which provides short routing paths between frequently communicating nodes distributed across N. In particular, the designed network should minimize the expected path length on N (with respect to D), which is a basic measure of the efficiency of the network. We show that this fundamental network design problem exhibits interesting connections to several classic combinatorial problems and to information theory. We derive a general lower bound based on the entropy of the communication pattern D, and present asymptotically optimal network-aware design algorithms for important distribution families, such as sparse distributions and distributions of locally bounded doubling dimensions.
  • We initiate the study of a natural and practically relevant new variant of online caching where the to-be-cached items can have dependencies. We assume that the universe is a tree T and items are tree nodes; we require that if a node v is cached then the whole subtree T(v) rooted at v is cached as well. This theoretical problem finds an immediate application in the context of forwarding table optimization in IP routing and software-defined networks. We present an elegant online deterministic algorithm TC for this problem, and rigorously prove that its competitive ratio is O(height(T) * k_ALG/(k_ALG-k_OPT+1)), where k_ALG and k_OPT denote the cache sizes of an online and the optimal offline algorithm, respectively. The result is optimal up to a factor of O(height(T)).
  • Today's routing protocols critically rely on the assumption that the underlying hardware is trusted. Given the increasing number of attacks on network devices, and recent reports on hardware backdoors this assumption has become questionable. Indeed, with the critical role computer networks play today, the contrast between our security assumptions and reality is problematic. This paper presents Software-Defined Adversarial Trajectory Sampling (SoftATS), an OpenFlow-based mechanism to efficiently monitor packet trajectories, also in the presence of non-cooperating or even adversarial switches or routers, e.g., containing hardware backdoors. Our approach is based on a secure, redundant and adaptive sample distribution scheme which allows us to provably detect adversarial switches or routers trying to reroute, mirror, drop, inject, or modify packets (i.e., header and/or payload). We evaluate the effectiveness of our approach in different adversarial settings, report on a proof-of-concept implementation, and provide a first evaluation of the performance overheads of such a scheme.
  • Ideally, by enabling multi-tenancy, network virtualization allows to improve resource utilization, while providing performance isolation: although the underlying resources are shared, the virtual network appears as a dedicated network to the tenant. However, providing such an illusion is challenging in practice, and over the last years, many expedient approaches have been proposed to provide performance isolation in virtual networks, by enforcing bandwidth reservations. We in this paper study another source for overheads and unpredictable performance in virtual networks: the hypervisor. The hypervisor is a critical component in multi-tenant environments, but its overhead and influence on performance are hardly understood today. In particular, we focus on OpenFlow-based virtualized Software Defined Networks (vSDNs). Network virtualization is considered a killer application for SDNs: a vSDN allows each tenant to flexibly manage its network from a logically centralized perspective, via a simple API. For the purpose of our study, we developed a new benchmarking tool for OpenFlow control and data planes, enabling high and consistent OpenFlow message rates. Using our tool, we identify and measure controllable and uncontrollable effects on performance and overhead, including the hypervisor technology, the number of tenants as well as the tenant type, as well as the type of OpenFlow messages.
  • The topological structure of complex networks has fascinated researchers for several decades, resulting in the discovery of many universal properties and reoccurring characteristics of different kinds of networks. However, much less is known today about the network dynamics: indeed, complex networks in reality are not static, but rather dynamically evolve over time. Our paper is motivated by the empirical observation that network evolution patterns seem far from random, but exhibit structure. Moreover, the specific patterns appear to depend on the network type, contradicting the existence of a "one fits it all" model. However, we still lack observables to quantify these intuitions, as well as metrics to compare graph evolutions. Such observables and metrics are needed for extrapolating or predicting evolutions, as well as for interpolating graph evolutions. To explore the many faces of graph dynamics and to quantify temporal changes, this paper suggests to build upon the concept of centrality, a measure of node importance in a network. In particular, we introduce the notion of centrality distance, a natural similarity measure for two graphs which depends on a given centrality, characterizing the graph type. Intuitively, centrality distances reflect the extent to which (non-anonymous) node roles are different or, in case of dynamic graphs, have changed over time, between two graphs. We evaluate the centrality distance approach for five evolutionary models and seven real-world social and physical networks. Our results empirically show the usefulness of centrality distances for characterizing graph dynamics compared to a null-model of random evolution, and highlight the differences between the considered scenarios. Interestingly, our approach allows us to compare the dynamics of very different networks, in terms of scale and evolution speed.
  • Virtual switches have become popular among cloud operating systems to interconnect virtual machines in a more flexible manner. However, this paper demonstrates that virtual switches introduce new attack surfaces in cloud setups, whose effects can be disastrous. Our analysis shows that these vulnerabilities are caused by: (1) inappropriate security assumptions (privileged virtual switch execution in kernel and user space), (2) the logical centralization of such networks (e.g., OpenStack or SDN), (3) the presence of bi-directional communication channels between data plane systems and the centralized controller, and (4) non-standard protocol parsers. Our work highlights the need to accommodate the data plane(s) in our threat models. In particular, it forces us to revisit today's assumption that the data plane can only be compromised by a sophisticated attacker: we show that compromising the data plane of modern computer networks can actually be performed by a very simple attacker with limited resources only and at low cost (i.e., at the cost of renting a virtual machine in the Cloud). As a case study, we fuzzed only 2\% of the code-base of a production quality virtual switch's packet processor (namely OvS), identifying serious vulnerabilities leading to unauthenticated remote code execution. In particular, we present the "rein worm" which allows us to fully compromise test-setups in less than 100 seconds. We also evaluate the performance overhead of existing mitigations such as ASLR, PIEs, and unconditional stack canaries on OvS. We find that while applying these countermeasures in kernel-space incurs a significant overhead, in user-space the performance overhead is negligible.
  • Programmability and verifiability lie at the heart of the software-defined networking paradigm. While OpenFlow and its match-action concept provide primitive operations to manipulate hardware configurations, over the last years, several more expressive network programming languages have been developed. This paper presents WNetKAT, the first network programming language accounting for the fact that networks are inherently weighted, and communications subject to capacity constraints (e.g., in terms of bandwidth) and costs (e.g., latency or monetary costs). WNetKAT is based on a syntactic and semantic extension of the NetKAT algebra. We demonstrate several relevant applications for WNetKAT, including cost- and capacity-aware reachability, as well as quality-of-service and fairness aspects. These applications do not only apply to classic, splittable and unsplittable (s; t)-flows, but also generalize to more complex network functions and service chains. For example, WNetKAT allows to model flows which need to traverse certain waypoint functions, which may change the traffic rate. This paper also shows the relation between the equivalence problem of WNetKAT and the equivalence problem of the weighted finite automata, which implies undecidability of the former. However, this paper also succeeds to prove the decidability of another useful problem, which is sufficient in many practical scnearios: whether an expression equals to 0. Moreover, we initiate the discussion of decidable subsets of the whole language.
  • In this work, we propose utilizing the rich connectivity between IXPs and ISPs for inter-domain path stitching, supervised by centralized QoS brokers. In this context, we highlight a novel abstraction of the Internet topology, i.e., the inter-IXP multigraph composed of IXPs and paths crossing the domains of their shared member ISPs. This can potentially serve as a dense Internet-wide substrate for provisioning guaranteed end-to-end (e2e) services with high path diversity and global IPv4 address space reach. We thus map the IXP multigraph, evaluate its potential, and introduce a rich algorithmic framework for path stitching on such graph structures.
  • This paper presents the vision of the Control Exchange Point (CXP) architectural model. The model is motivated by the inflexibility and ossification of today's inter-domain routing system, which renders critical QoS-constrained end-to-end (e2e) network services difficult or simply impossible to provide. CXPs operate on slices of ISP networks and are built on basic Software Defined Networking (SDN) principles, such as the clean decoupling of the routing control plane from the data plane and the consequent logical centralization of control. The main goal of the architectural model is to provide e2e services with QoS constraints across domains. This is achieved through defining a new type of business relationship between ISPs, which advertise partial paths (so-called pathlets) with specific properties, and the orchestrating role of the CXPs, which dynamically stitch them together and provision e2e QoS. Revenue from value-added services flows from the clients of the CXP to the ISPs participating in the service. The novelty of the approach is the combination of SDN programmability and dynamic path stitching techniques for inter-domain routing, which extends the value proposition of SDN over multiple domains. We first describe the challenges related to e2e service provision with the current inter-domain routing and peering model, and then continue with the benefits of our approach. Subsequently, we describe the CXP model in detail and report on an initial feasibility analysis.
  • Modern Internet applications, from HD video-conferencing to health monitoring and remote control of power-plants, pose stringent demands on network latency, bandwidth and availability. An approach to support such applications and provide inter-domain guarantees, enabling new avenues for innovation, is using centralized inter-domain routing brokers. These entities centralize routing control for mission-critical traffic across domains, working in parallel to BGP. In this work, we propose using IXPs as natural points for stitching inter-domain paths under the control of inter-domain routing brokers. To evaluate the potential of this approach, we first map the global substrate of inter-IXP pathlets that IXP members could offer, based on measurements for 229 IXPs worldwide. We show that using IXPs as stitching points has two useful properties. Up to 91 % of the total IPv4 address space can be served by such inter-domain routing brokers when working in concert with just a handful of large IXPs and their associated ISP members. Second, path diversity on the inter-IXP graph increases by up to 29 times, as compared to current BGP valley-free routing. To exploit the rich path diversity, we introduce algorithms that inter-domain routing brokers can use to embed paths, subject to bandwidth and latency constraints. We show that our algorithms scale to the sizes of the measured graphs and can serve diverse simulated path request mixes. Our work highlights a novel direction for SDN innovation across domains, based on logically centralized control and programmable IXP fabrics.
  • The topological structure of complex networks has fascinated researchers for several decades, resulting in the discovery of many universal properties and reoccurring characteristics of different kinds of networks. However, much less is known today about the network dynamics: indeed, complex networks in reality are not static, but rather dynamically evolve over time. Our paper is motivated by the empirical observation that network evolution patterns seem far from random, but exhibit structure. Moreover, the specific patterns appear to depend on the network type, contradicting the existence of a "one fits it all" model. However, we still lack observables to quantify these intuitions, as well as metrics to compare graph evolutions. Such observables and metrics are needed for extrapolating or predicting evolutions, as well as for interpolating graph evolutions. To explore the many faces of graph dynamics and to quantify temporal changes, this paper suggests to build upon the concept of centrality, a measure of node importance in a network. In particular, we introduce the notion of centrality distance, a natural similarity measure for two graphs which depends on a given centrality, characterizing the graph type. Intuitively, centrality distances reflect the extent to which (non-anonymous) node roles are different or, in case of dynamic graphs, have changed over time, between two graphs. We evaluate the centrality distance approach for five evolutionary models and seven real-world social and physical networks. Our results empirically show the usefulness of centrality distances for characterizing graph dynamics compared to a null-model of random evolution, and highlight the differences between the considered scenarios. Interestingly, our approach allows us to compare the dynamics of very different networks, in terms of scale and evolution speed.
  • Computer networks today typically do not provide any mechanisms to the users to learn, in a reliable manner, which paths have (and have not) been taken by their packets. Rather, it seems inevitable that as soon as a packet leaves the network card, the user is forced to trust the network provider to forward the packets as expected or agreed upon. This can be undesirable, especially in the light of today's trend toward more programmable networks: after a successful cyber attack on the network management system or Software-Defined Network (SDN) control plane, an adversary in principle has complete control over the network. This paper presents a low-cost and efficient solution to detect misbehaviors and ensure trustworthy routing over untrusted or insecure providers, in particular providers whose management system or control plane has been compromised (e.g., using a cyber attack). We propose Routing-Verification-as-a-Service (RVaaS): RVaaS offers clients a flexible interface to query information relevant to their traffic, while respecting the autonomy of the network provider. RVaaS leverages key features of OpenFlow-based SDNs to combine (passive and active) configuration monitoring, logical data plane verification and actual in-band tests, in a novel manner.
  • The design of distributed gathering and convergence algorithms for tiny robots has recently received much attention. In particular, it has been shown that convergence problems can even be solved for very weak, \emph{oblivious} robots: robots which cannot maintain state from one round to the next. The oblivious robot model is hence attractive from a self-stabilization perspective, where state is subject to adversarial manipulation. However, to the best of our knowledge, all existing robot convergence protocols rely on the assumption that robots, despite being "weak", can measure distances. We in this paper initiate the study of convergence protocols for even simpler robots, called \emph{monoculus robots}: robots which cannot measure distances. In particular, we introduce two natural models which relax the assumptions on the robots' cognitive capabilities: (1) a Locality Detection ($\mathcal{LD}$) model in which a robot can only detect whether another robot is closer than a given constant distance or not, (2) an Orthogonal Line Agreement ($\mathcal{OLA}$) model in which robots only agree on a pair of orthogonal lines (say North-South and West-East, but without knowing which is which). The problem turns out to be non-trivial, and simple median and angle bisection strategies can easily increase the distances among robots (e.g., the area of the enclosing convex hull) over time. Our main contribution are deterministic self-stabilizing convergence algorithms for these two models, together with a complexity analysis. We also show that in some sense, the assumptions made in our models are minimal: by relaxing the assumptions on the \textit{monoculus robots} further, we run into impossibility results.