• We propose a new way of defining Hamiltonians for quantum field theories without any renormalization procedure. The resulting Hamiltonians, called IBC Hamiltonians, are mathematically well-defined (and in particular, ultraviolet finite) without an ultraviolet cut-off such as smearing out the particles over a nonzero radius; rather, the particles are assigned radius zero. These Hamiltonians agree with those obtained through renormalization whenever both are known to exist. We describe explicit examples of IBC Hamiltonians. Their definition, which is best expressed in the particle-position representation of the wave function, involves a novel type of boundary condition on the wave function, which we call an interior-boundary condition (IBC). The relevant configuration space is one of a variable number of particles, and the relevant boundary consists of the configurations with two or more particles at the same location. The IBC relates the value (or derivative) of the wave function at a boundary point to the value of the wave function at an interior point (here, in a sector of configuration space corresponding to a lesser number of particles).
  • We prove the validity of linear response theory at zero temperature for perturbations of gapped Hamiltonians describing interacting fermions on a lattice. As an essential innovation, our result requires the spectral gap assumption only for the unperturbed Hamiltonian and applies to a large class of perturbations that close the spectral gap. Moreover, we prove formulas also for higher order response coefficients. Our justification of linear response theory is based on a novel extension of the adiabatic theorem to situations where a time-dependent perturbation closes the gap. According to the standard version of the adiabatic theorem, when the perturbation is switched on adiabatically and as long as the gap does not close, the initial ground state evolves into the ground state of the perturbed operator. The new adiabatic theorem states that for perturbations that are either slowly varying potentials or small quasi-local operators, once the perturbation closes the gap, the adiabatic evolution follows non-equilibrium almost-stationary states (NEASS) that we construct explicitly.
  • We prove an adiabatic theorem for general densities of observables that are sums of local terms in finite systems of interacting fermions, without periodicity assumptions on the Hamiltonian and with error estimates that are uniform in the size of the system. Our result provides an adiabatic expansion to all orders, in particular, also for initial data that lie in eigenspaces of degenerate eigenvalues. Our proof is based on ideas from a recent work of Bachmann et al. who proved an adiabatic theorem for interacting spin systems. As one important application of this adiabatic theorem, we provide the first rigorous derivation of the so-called linear response formula for the current density induced by an adiabatic change of the Hamiltonian of a system of interacting fermions in a ground state, with error estimates uniform in the system size. We also discuss the application to quantum Hall systems.
  • We consider the dynamics of $N$ interacting bosons initially exhibiting Bose-Einstein condensation. Due to an external trapping potential, the bosons are strongly confined in two spatial directions, with the transverse extension of the trap being of order $\varepsilon$. The non-negative interaction potential is scaled such that its range and its scattering length are both of order $(N/\varepsilon^2)^{-1}$, corresponding to the Gross-Pitaevskii scaling of a dilute Bose gas. We prove that in the simultaneous limit $N\rightarrow\infty$ and $\varepsilon\rightarrow 0$, the condensation is preserved by the dynamics and the time evolution is asymptotically described by a Gross-Pitaevskii equation in one dimension. The strength of the nonlinearity is given by the scattering length of the unscaled interaction, multiplied with a factor depending on the shape of the confining potential. For our analysis, we adapt an approach by Pickl to the problem with dimensional reduction and rely on the derivation of the one-dimensional NLS equation for interactions with softer scaling behaviour.
  • We study generalised quantum waveguides in the presence of moderate and strong external magnetic fields. Applying recent results on the adiabatic limit of the connection Laplacian we show how to construct and compute effective Hamiltonians that allow, in particular, for a detailed spectral analysis of magnetic waveguide Hamiltonians. We apply our general construction to a number of explicit examples, most of which are not covered by previous results.
  • We consider a way of defining quantum Hamiltonians involving particle creation and annihilation based on an interior-boundary condition (IBC) on the wave function, where the wave function is the particle-position representation of a vector in Fock space, and the IBC relates (essentially) the values of the wave function at any two configurations that differ only by the creation of a particle. Here we prove, for a model of particle creation at one or more point sources using the Laplace operator as the free Hamiltonian, that a Hamiltonian can indeed be rigorously defined in this way without the need for any ultraviolet regularization, and that it is self-adjoint. We prove further that introducing an ultraviolet cut-off (thus smearing out particles over a positive radius) and applying a certain known renormalization procedure (taking the limit of removing the cut-off while subtracting a constant that tends to infinity) yields, up to addition of a finite constant, the Hamiltonian defined by the IBC.
  • We provide a constructive proof of exponentially localized Wannier functions and related Bloch frames in 1- and 2-dimensional time-reversal symmetric (TRS) topological insulators. The construction is formulated in terms of periodic TRS families of projectors (corresponding, in applications, to the eigenprojectors on an arbitrary number of relevant energy bands), and is thus model-independent. The possibility to enforce also a TRS constraint on the frame is investigated. This leads to a topological obstruction in dimension 2, related to $\mathbb{Z}_2$ topological phases. We review several proposals for $\mathbb{Z}_2$ indices that distinguish these topological phases, including the ones by Fu--Kane [Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006), 195312], Prodan [Phys. Rev. B 83 (2011), 235115], Graf--Porta [Commun. Math. Phys. 324 (2013), 851] and Fiorenza--Monaco--Panati [Commun. Math. Phys., in press]. We show that all these formulations are equivalent. In particular, this allows to prove a geometric formula for the the $\mathbb{Z}_2$ invariant of 2-dimensional TRS topological insulators, originally indicated in [Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006), 195312], which expresses it in terms of the Berry connection and the Berry curvature.
  • We consider Schr\"odinger operators $H=-\Delta_{g_\varepsilon} + V$ on a fibre bundle $M\stackrel{\pi}{\to}B$ with compact fibres and a metric $g_\varepsilon$ that blows up directions perpendicular to the fibres by a factor ${\varepsilon^{-1}\gg 1}$. We show that for an eigenvalue $\lambda$ of the fibre-wise part of $H$, satisfying a local gap condition, and every $N\in \mathbb{N}$ there exists a subspace of $L^2(M)$ that is invariant under $H$ up to errors of order $\varepsilon^{N+1}$. The dynamical and spectral features of $H$ on this subspace can be described by an effective operator on the fibre-wise $\lambda$-eigenspace bundle $\mathcal{E}\to B$, giving detailed asymptotics for $H$.
  • We consider a system of $N$ bosons confined to a thin waveguide, i.e.\ to a region of space within an $\varepsilon$-tube around a curve in $\mathbb{R}^3$. We show that when taking simultaneously the NLS limit $N\to \infty$ and the limit of strong confinement $\varepsilon\to 0$, the time-evolution of such a system starting in a state close to a Bose-Einstein condensate is approximately captured by a non-linear Schr\"odinger equation in one dimension. The strength of the non-linearity in this Gross-Pitaevskii type equation depends on the shape of the cross-section of the waveguide, while the "bending" and the "twisting" of the waveguide contribute potential terms. Our analysis is based on an approach to mean-field limits developed by Pickl.
  • We consider the Schr\"odinger operator in two dimensions with a periodic potential and a strong constant magnetic field perturbed by slowly varying non-periodic scalar and vector potentials, $\phi(\epsilon x)$ and $A(\epsilon x)$, for $\epsilon\ll 1$. For each isolated family of magnetic Bloch bands we derive an effective Hamiltonian that is unitarily equivalent to the restriction of the Schr\"odinger operator to a corresponding almost invariant subspace. At leading order, our effective Hamiltonian can be interpreted as the Peierls substitution Hamiltonian widely used in physics for non-magnetic Bloch bands. However, while for non-magnetic Bloch bands the corresponding result is well understood, for magnetic Bloch bands it is not clear how to even define a Peierls substitution Hamiltonian beyond a formal expression. The source of the difficulty is a topological obstruction: magnetic Bloch bundles are generically not trivializable. As a consequence, Peierls substitution Hamiltonians for magnetic Bloch bands turn out to be pseudodifferential operators acting on sections of non-trivial vector bundles over a two-torus, the reduced Brillouin zone. Part of our contribution is the construction of a suitable Weyl calculus for such pseudos. As an application of our results we construct a new family of canonical one-band Hamiltonians $H^B_{\theta,q}$ for magnetic Bloch bands with Chern number $\theta\in \mathbb{Z}$ that generalizes the Hofstadter model $H^B_{\rm Hof} = H^B_{0,1}$ for a single non-magnetic Bloch band. It turns out that $H^B_{\theta,q}$ is isospectral to $H^{q^2B}_{\rm Hof}$ for any $\theta$ and all spectra agree with the Hofstadter spectrum depicted in his famous black and white butterfly. However, the resulting Chern numbers of subbands, corresponding to Hall conductivities, depend on $\theta$ and $q$, and thus the models lead to different colored butterflies.
  • We describe here a novel way of defining Hamiltonians for quantum field theories (QFTs), based on the particle-position representation of the state vector and involving a condition on the state vector that we call an "interior-boundary condition." At least for some QFTs (and, we hope, for many), this approach leads to a well-defined, self-adjoint Hamiltonian without the need for an ultraviolet cut-off or renormalization.
  • The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) has recently concluded a set of engineering flights for Observatory performance evaluation. These in-flight opportunities are viewed as a first comprehensive assessment of the Observatory's performance and are used to guide future development activities, as well as to identify additional Observatory upgrades. Pointing stability was evaluated, including the image motion due to rigid-body and flexible-body telescope modes as well as possible aero-optical image motion. We report on recent improvements in pointing stability by using an active mass damper system installed on the telescope. Measurements and characterization of the shear layer and cavity seeing, as well as image quality evaluation as a function of wavelength have also been performed. Additional tests targeted basic Observatory capabilities and requirements, including pointing accuracy, chopper evaluation and imager sensitivity. This paper reports on the data collected during these flights and presents current SOFIA Observatory performance and characterization.
  • We study general quantum waveguides and establish explicit effective Hamiltonians for the Laplacian on these spaces. A conventional quantum waveguide is an $\varepsilon$-tubular neighbourhood of a curve in $\mathbb{R}^3$ and the object of interest is the Dirichlet Laplacian on this tube in the asymptotic limit $\varepsilon\to0$. We generalise this by considering fibre bundles $M$ over a $d$-dimensional submanifold $B\subset\mathbb{R}^{d+k}$ with fibres diffeomorphic to $F\subset\mathbb{R}^k$, whose total space is embedded into an $\varepsilon$-neighbourhood of $B$. From this point of view $B$ takes the role of the curve and $F$ that of the disc-shaped cross-section of a conventional quantum waveguide. Our approach allows, among other things, for waveguides whose cross-sections $F$ are deformed along $B$ and also the study of the Laplacian on the boundaries of such waveguides. By applying recent results on the adiabatic limit of Schr\"odinger operators on fibre bundles we show, in particular, that for small energies the dynamics and the spectrum of the Laplacian on $M$ are reflected by the adiabatic approximation associated to the ground state band of the normal Laplacian. We give explicit formulas for the according effective operator on $L^2(B)$ in various scenarios, thereby improving and extending many of the known results on quantum waveguides and quantum layers in $\mathbb{R}^3$.
  • We show how to relate the full quantum dynamics of a spin-1/2 particle on R^d to a classical Hamiltonian dynamics on the enlarged phase space R^d x S^2 up to errors of second order in the semiclassical parameter. This is done via an Egorov-type theorem for normal Wigner-Weyl calculus for R^d [Lei10,Fol89] combined with the Stratonovich-Weyl calculus for SU(2) [VGB89]. For a specific class of Hamiltonians, including the Rabi- and Jaynes-Cummings model, we prove an Egorov theorem for times much longer than the semiclassical time scale. We illustrate the approach for a simple model of the Stern-Gerlach experiment.
  • We demonstrate that a highly excited quantum electromagnetic mode strongly interacting with a single qubit exhibits several distinct resonances in addition to the Bloch-Siegert resonance condition that arises in the interaction with classical radiation. The resonance phenomena are associated with non-classical effects: Collapse of Rabi oscillations, splitting of the photon wave packet, and field-qubit entanglement. The analysis is based on a semiclassical phase-space flow of 2-by-2 matrices and becomes exact when the photon number tends to infinity. The flow equations are solved perturbatively and numerically, showing that the resonant detuning of the field and qubit frequencies lie on two branches in the leading order, that further split into distinct curves in higher orders.
  • We consider the semiclassical limit of quantum systems with a Hamiltonian given by the Weyl quantization of an operator valued symbol. Systems composed of slow and fast degrees of freedom are of this form. Typically a small dimensionless parameter $\varepsilon\ll 1$ controls the separation of time scales and the limit $\varepsilon\to 0$ corresponds to an adiabatic limit, in which the slow and fast degrees of freedom decouple. At the same time $\varepsilon\to 0$ is the semiclassical limit for the slow degrees of freedom. In this paper we show that the $\varepsilon$-dependent classical flow for the slow degrees of freedom first discovered by Littlejohn and Flynn, coming from an $\epsi$-dependent classical Hamilton function and an $\varepsilon$-dependent symplectic form, has a concrete mathematical and physical meaning: Based on this flow we prove a formula for equilibrium expectations, an Egorov theorem and transport of Wigner functions, thereby approximating properties of the quantum system up to errors of order $\varepsilon^2$. In the context of Bloch electrons formal use of this classical system has triggered considerable progress in solid state physics. Hence we discuss in some detail the application of the general results to the Hofstadter model, which describes a two-dimensional gas of non-interacting electrons in a constant magnetic field in the tight-binding approximation.
  • Formulas for the contribution of the conduction electrons to the polarization and magnetization are derived for disordered systems and within a one-particle framework. These results generalize known formulas for Bloch electrons and the presented proofs considerably simplify and strengthen prior justifications. The new formulas show that orbital polarization and magnetization are of geometric nature. This leads to quantization for a periodically driven Piezo effect as well as the derivative of the magnetization w.r.t. the chemical potential. It is also shown how the latter is connected to boundary currents in Chern insulators. The main technical tools in the proofs are an adaption of Nenciu's super-adiabatic theory to C$^*$-dynamical systems and Bellissard's Ito derivatives w.r.t. the magnetic field.
  • We consider the dynamics of a massless scalar field with time-dependent sources in the adiabatic limit. This is an example of an adiabatic problem without spectral gap. The main goal of our paper is to illustrate the difference between the error of the adiabatic approximation and the concept of non-adiabatic transitions for gapless systems. In our example the non-adiabatic transitions correspond to emission of free bosons, while the error of the adiabatic approximation is dominated by a velocity-dependent deformation of the ground state of the field. In order to capture these concepts precisely, we show how to construct super-adiabatic approximations for a gapless system.
  • In this letter we give a systematic derivation and justification of the semiclassical model for the slow degrees of freedom in adiabatic slow-fast systems first found by Littlejohn and Flynn [5]. The classical Hamiltonian obtains a correction due to the variation of the adiabatic subspaces and the symplectic form is modified by the curvature of the Berry connection. We show that this classical system can be used to approximate quantum mechanical expectations and the time-evolution of operators also in sub-leading order in the combined adiabatic and semiclassical limit. In solid state physics the corresponding semiclassical description of Bloch electrons has led to substantial progress during the recent years, see [1]. Here, as an illustration, we show how to compute the Piezo-current arising from a slow deformation of a crystal in the presence of a constant magnetic field.
  • We consider the Pauli-Fierz Hamiltonian with dynamical nuclei and investigate the transitions between the resonant electronic energy levels under the assumption that there are no free photons in the beginning. Coupling the limits of small fine structure constant and of heavy nuclei allows us to prove the validity of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation at leading order and to provide a simple formula for the rate of spontaneous decay.
  • We show how to translate recent results on effective Hamiltonians for quantum systems constrained to a submanifold by a sharply peaked potential to quantum systems on thin Dirichlet tubes. While the structure of the problem and the form of the effective Hamiltonian stays the same, the difficulties in the proofs are different.
  • We derive the effective Hamiltonian for a quantum system constrained to a submanifold (the constraint manifold) of configuration space (the ambient space) in the asymptotic limit where the restoring forces tend to infinity. In contrast to earlier works we consider at the same time the effects of variations in the constraining potential and the effects of interior and exterior geometry which appear at different energy scales and thus provide, for the first time, a complete picture ranging over all interesting energy scales. We show that the leading order contribution to the effective Hamiltonian is the adiabatic potential given by an eigenvalue of the confining potential well-known in the context of adiabatic quantum wave guides. At next to leading order we see effects from the variation of the normal eigenfunctions in form of a Berry connection. We apply our results to quantum wave guides and provide an example for the occurrence of a topological phase due to the geometry of a quantum wave circuit, i.e. a closed quantum wave guide.
  • We consider the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation on a Riemannian manifold $\mathcal{A}$ with a potential that localizes a certain class of states close to a fixed submanifold $\mathcal{C}$. When we scale the potential in the directions normal to $\mathcal{C}$ by a parameter $\varepsilon\ll 1$, the solutions concentrate in an $\veps$-neighborhood of $\mathcal{C}$. We derive an effective Schr\"odinger equation on the submanifold $\mathcal{C}$ and show that its solutions, suitably lifted to $\mathcal{A}$, approximate the solutions of the original equation on $\mathcal{A}$ up to errors of order $\varepsilon^3|t|$ at time $t$. Furthermore, we prove that the eigenvalues of the corresponding effective Hamiltonian below a certain energy coincide up to errors of order $\varepsilon^3$ with those of the full Hamiltonian under reasonable conditions. Our results hold in the situation where tangential and normal energies are of the same order, and where exchange between these energies occurs. In earlier results tangential energies were assumed to be small compared to normal energies, and rather restrictive assumptions were needed, to ensure that the separation of energies is maintained during the time evolution. Most importantly, we can allow for constraining potentials that change their shape along the submanifold, which is the typical situation in the applications to quantum wave guides and to quantum molecular dynamics. In order to explain the meaning and the relevance of some of the terms in the effective Hamiltonian, we analyze in some detail the application to quantum wave guides, where $\mathcal{C}$ is a curve in $\mathcal{A}=\mathbb{R}^3$. This allows us to generalize two recent results on spectra of such wave guides.
  • We study the dynamics of a molecule's nuclear wave-function near an avoided crossing of two electronic energy levels, for one nuclear degree of freedom. We derive the general form of the Schroedinger equation in the n-th superadiabatic representation for all n, and give some partial results about the asymptotics for large n. Using these results, we obtain closed formulas for the time development of the component of the wave function in an initially unoccupied energy subspace, when a wave packet crosses the transition region. In the optimal superadiabatic representation, which we define, this component builds up monontonically. Finally, we give an explicit formula for the transition wave function away from the crossing, which is in excellent agreement with high precision numerical calculations.
  • We study the time-dependent scattering of a quantum mechanical wave packet at a barrier for energies larger than the barrier height, in the semi-classical regime. More precisely, we are interested in the leading order of the exponentially small scattered part of the wave packet in the semiclassical parameter when the energy density of the incident wave is sharply peaked around some value. We prove that this reflected part has, to leading order, a Gaussian shape centered on the classical trajectory for all times soon after its birth time. We give explicit formulas and rigorous error bounds for the reflected wave for all of these times.