• Ionic liquids constrained at interfaces or restricted in sub-nanometric pores are increasingly employed in modern technologies, including energy applications. Understanding the details of their behavior in these conditions is therefore critical. By using Molecular Dynamics simulation we clarify theoretically and numerically the effect of confinement at the nanoscale on the static and dynamic properties of an ionic liquid. In particular, we focus on the interplay among the size of the ions, the slit pore width and the length scale associated to the long-range organization of polar and apolar domains present in the bulk material. By modulating both the temperature and the extent of the confinement we demonstrate the existence of a complex re-entrant phase behavior, including isotropic liquid and liquid-crystal-like phases with different symmetries. We show how these changes impact the relative organization of the ions, with substantial modifications of the Coulombic ordering, and their dynamical state. In this respect, we reveal a remarkable decoupling of the dynamics of the counter-ions, pointing to very different roles played by these in charge transport under confinement. We finally discuss our findings in connection with very recent experimental and theoretical work.
  • We investigate the dynamics of water confined in soft ionic nano-assemblies, an issue critical for a general understanding of the multi-scale structure-function interplay in advanced materials. We focus in particular on hydrated perfluoro-sulfonic acid compounds employed as electrolytes in fuel cells. These materials form phase-separated morphologies that show outstanding proton-conducting properties, directly related to the state and dynamics of the absorbed water. We have quantified water motion and ion transport by combining Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering, Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and Molecular Dynamics computer simulation. Effective water and ion diffusion coefficients have been determined together with their variation upon hydration at the relevant atomic, nanoscopic and macroscopic scales, providing a complete picture of transport. We demonstrate that confinement at the nanoscale and direct interaction with the charged interfaces produce anomalous sub-diffusion, due to a heterogeneous space-dependent dynamics within the ionic nanochannels. This is irrespective of the details of the chemistry of the hydrophobic confining matrix, confirming the statistical significance of our conclusions. Our findings turn out to indicate interesting connections and possibilities of cross-fertilization with other domains, including biophysics. They also establish fruitful correspondences with advanced topics in statistical mechanics, resulting in new possibilities for the analysis of Neutron scattering data.
  • Polymer translocation is a promising strategy for the next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. The use of biological and synthetic nano-pores, however, still suffers from serious drawbacks. In particular, the width of the membrane layer can accommodate several bases at the same time, making difficult accurate sequencing applications. More recently, the use of graphene membranes has paved the way to new sequencing capabilities, with the possibility to measure transverse currents, among other advances. The reduced thickness of these new membranes poses new questions on the effect of deformability and vibrations of the membrane on the translocation process, two features which are not taken into account in the well-established theoretical frameworks. Here, we make a first step forward in this direction. We report numerical simulation work on a model system simple enough to allow gathering significant insight on the effect of these features on the average translocation time, with appropriate statistical significance. We have found that the interplay between thermal fluctuations and the deformability properties of the nano-pore play a crucial role in determining the process. We conclude by discussing new directions for further work.
  • In crystals, molecules thermally vibrate around the periodic lattice sites. Vibrational motions are well understood in terms of phonons, which carry heat and control heat transport. The situation is notably different in disordered solids, where vibrational excitations are not phonons and can be even localized. Recent numerical work has established the concept of elastic heterogeneity: disordered solids show inhomogeneous local mechanical response. Clearly, the heterogeneous nature of elastic properties strongly influences vibrational and thermal properties, and it is expected to be the origin of anomalous features, including boson peak, vibrational localization, and temperature dependence of thermal conductivity. These are all crucial long-standing problems in materials physics, which we address in the present work. We have considered a toy model able to stabilize different states of matter, by introducing an increasing amount of size disorder. The phase diagram generated by molecular dynamics simulations encompasses the perfect crystalline state with a spatially homogeneous elastic moduli distribution, multiple defective phases with increasing moduli heterogeneities, and eventually a series of amorphous states. We have established clear correlations among the heterogeneous local mechanical response, vibrational states, and thermal conductivity. We provide evidence that elastic heterogeneity controls both vibrational and thermal properties, and is a key concept to understand the anomalous puzzling features of disordered solids.
  • Molecular dynamics simulation studies were performed to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of liquid carbon disulfide from ambient to elevated pressure conditions. The results obtained have revealed structural changes at high pressures, which are related to the more dense packing of the molecules inside the first solvation shell. The calculated neutron and X-Ray structure factors have been compared with available experimental diffraction data, also revealing the pressure effects on the short-range structure of the liquid. The pressure effects on the translational, reorientational and residence dynamics are very strong, revealing a significant slowing down when going from ambient pressure to 1.2 GPa. The translational dynamics of the linear CS2 molecules have been found to be more anisotropic at elevated pressures, where cage effects and librational motions are reflected on the shape of the calculated time correlation functions and their corresponding spectral densities.
  • Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are an attractive alternative power source for a wide variety of applications. To optimize their performances, a complete description of the solvation properties of the ion in the electrolyte is crucial. A comprehensive understanding at the nanoscale of the solvation structure of lithium ions in nonaqueous carbonate electrolytes is, however, still unclear. We have measured by femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy the orientational correlation time of the CO stretching mode of Li+-bound and Li+-unbound ethylene carbonate molecules, in LiBF4, LiPF6, and LiClO4 ethylene carbonate solutions with different concentrations. Surprisingly, we have found that the coordination number of ethylene carbonate in the first solvation shell of Li+ is only two, in all solutions with concentrations higher than 0.5 M. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the presence of anions in the first coordination shell modifies the generally accepted tetrahedral structure of the complex, allowing only two EC molecules to coordinate to Li+ directly. Our results demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the anion influence on the overall structure of the first solvation shell of the Li+ ion. The formation of such a cation/solvent/anion complex provides a rational explanation for the ionic conductivity drop of lithium/carbonate electrolyte solutions at high concentrations.
  • We present a computer simulation study of glassy and crystalline states using the standard Lennard-Jones interaction potential that is truncated at a finite cut-off distance, as is typical of many computer simulations. We demonstrate that the discontinuity at the cut-off distance in the first derivative of the potential (corresponding to the interparticle force) leads to the appearance of cut-off nonlinearities. These cut-off nonlinearities persist into the very-low-temperature regime thereby affecting low-temperature thermal vibrations, which leads to a breakdown of the harmonic approximation for many eigen modes, particularly for low-frequency vibrational modes. Furthermore, while expansion nonlinearities which are due to higher order terms in the Taylor expansion of the interaction potential are usually ignored at low temperatures and show up as the temperature increases, cut-off nonlinearities can become most significant at the lowest temperatures. Anharmonic effects readily show up in the elastic moduli which not only depend on the eigen frequencies, but are crucially sensitive to the eigen vectors of the normal modes. Whereas, those observables that rely mainly on static structural information or just the eigen frequencies, such as the vibrational density of states, total potential energy, and specific heat, show negligible dependence on the presence of the cut-off. Similar aspects of nonlinear behavior have recently been reported in model granular materials, where the constituent particles interact through finite-range, purely-repulsive potentials. These nonlinearities have been ascribed to the nature of the sudden cut-off at contact in the force-law, thus we demonstrate that cut-off nonlinearities emerge as a general feature of ordered and disordered solid state systems interacting through truncated potentials.
  • We have studied by Molecular Dynamics computer simulations the dynamics of water confined in ionic surfactants phases, ranging from well ordered lamellar structures to micelles at low and high water loading, respectively. We have analysed in depth the main dynamical features in terms of mean squared displacements and intermediate scattering functions, and found clear evidences of sub-diffusive behaviour. We have identified water molecules lying at the charged interface with the hydrophobic confining matrix as the main responsible for this unusual feature, and provided a comprehensive picture for dynamics based on a very precise analysis of life times at the interface. We conclude by providing, for the first time to our knowledge, a unique framework for rationalising the existence of important dynamical heterogeneities in fluids absorbed in soft confining environments.
  • The value measured in the amorphous structure with the same chemical composition is often considered as a lower bound for the thermal conductivity of any material: the heat carriers are strongly scattered by disorder, and their lifetimes reach the minimum time scale of thermal vibrations. An appropriate design at the nano-scale, however, may allow one to reduce the thermal conductivity even below the amorphous limit. In the present contribution, using molecular-dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo formulation, we study systematically the thermal conductivity of layered phononic materials (superlattices), by tuning different parameters that can characterize such structures. We discover that the key to reach a lower-than-amorphous thermal conductivity is to block almost completely the propagation of the heat carriers, the superlattice phonons. We demonstrate that a large mass difference in the two intercalated layers, or weakened interactions across the interface between layers result in materials with very low thermal conductivity, below the values of the corresponding amorphous counterparts.
  • Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been employed in the present study to investigate the solvation of lithium cations in pure organic carbonate solvents (ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC)) and their binary (EC-DMC, 1:1 molar composition) and ternary (EC-DMC-PC, 1:1:3 molar composition) mixtures. The results obtained by both methods indicate that the formation of complexes with four solvent molecules around Li+, exhibiting a strong local tetrahedral order, is the most favorable. However, the molecular dynamics simulations have revealed the existence of significant structural heterogeneities, extending up to a length scale which is more than five times the size of the first coordination shell radius. Due to these significant structural fluctuations in the bulk liquid phases, the use of larger size clusters in DFT calculations has been suggested. Contrary to the findings of the DFT calculations on small isolated clusters, the MD simulations have predicted a preference of Li+ to interact with DMC molecules within its first solvation shell and not with the highly polar EC and PC ones, in the binary and ternary mixtures. This behavior has been attributed to the local tetrahedral packing of the solvent molecules in the first solvation shell of Li+, which causes a cancellation of the individual molecular dipole vectors, and this effect seems to be more important in the cases where molecules of the same type are present. Due to these cancellation effects, the total dipole in the first solvation shell of Li+ increases when the local mole fraction of DMC is high.
  • Morphology of polymer electrolytes membranes (PEM), e.g., Nafion, inside PEM fuel cell catalyst layers has significant impact on the electrochemical activity and transport phenomena that determine cell performance. In those regions, Nafion can be found as an ultra-thin film, coating the catalyst and the catalyst support surfaces. The impact of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic character of these surfaces on the structural formation of the films has not been sufficiently explored yet. Here, we report about Molecular Dynamics simulation investigation of the substrate effects on the ionomer ultra-thin film morphology at different hydration levels. We use a mean-field-like model we introduced in previous publications for the interaction of the hydrated Nafion ionomer with a substrate, characterized by a tunable degree of hydrophilicity. We show that the affinity of the substrate with water plays a crucial role in the molecular rearrangement of the ionomer film, resulting in completely different morphologies. Detailed structural description in different regions of the film shows evidences of strongly heterogeneous behavior. A qualitative discussion of the implications of our observations on the PEMFC catalyst layer performance is finally proposed.
  • We present a coarse-grained model for ionic surfactants in explicit aqueous solutions, and study by computer simulation both the impact of water content on the morphology of the system, and the consequent effect of the formed interfaces on the structural features of the adsorbed fluid. On increasing the hydration level at ambient conditions, the model exhibits a series of three distinct phases: lamellar, cylindrical and micellar. We characterize the different structures in terms of diffraction patterns and neutron scattering static structure factors. We demonstrate that the rate of variation of the nano-metric sizes of the self-assembled water domains shows peculiar changes in the different phases. We also analyse in depth the structure of the water/confining matrix interfaces, the implications of their tunable degree of curvature, and the properties of water molecules in the different restricted environments. Finally, we discuss our results compared to experimental data and their impact on a wide range of important scientific and technological domains, where the behavior of water at the interface with soft materials is crucial.
  • In the recent years, much attention has been devoted to the inhomogeneous nature of the mechanical response at the nano-scale in disordered solids. Clearly, the elastic heterogeneities that have been characterized in this context are expected to strongly impact the nature of the sound waves which, in contrast to the case of perfect crystals, cannot be completely rationalized in terms of phonons. Building on previous work on a toy model showing an amorphisation transition [Mizuno H, Mossa S, Barrat JL (2013) EPL {\bf 104}:56001], we investigate the relationship between sound waves and elastic heterogeneities in a unified framework, by continuously interpolating from the perfect crystal, through increasingly defective phases, to fully developed glasses. We provide strong evidence of a direct correlation between sound waves features and the extent of the heterogeneous mechanical response at the nano-scale.
  • Disordered solids exhibit unusual properties of their vibrational states and thermal conductivities. Recent progresses have well established the concept of "elastic heterogeneity", i.e., disordered materials show spatially inhomogeneous elastic moduli. In this study, by using molecular-dynamics simulations, we gradually introduce "disorder" into a numerical system to control its modulus heterogeneity. The system starts from a perfect crystalline state, progressively transforms into an increasingly disordered crystalline state, and finally undergoes structural amorphisation. We monitor independently the elastic heterogeneity, the vibrational states, and the thermal conductivity across this transition, and show that the heterogeneity in elastic moduli is well correlated to vibrational and thermal anomalies of the disordered system.
  • Glasses exhibit spatially inhomogeneous elastic properties, which can be investigated by measuring their elastic moduli at a local scale. Various methods to evaluate the local elastic modulus have been proposed in the literature. A first possibility is to measure the local stress-local strain curve and to obtain the local elastic modulus from the slope of the curve, or equivalently to use a local fluctuation formula. Another possible route is to assume an affine strain and to use the applied global strain instead of the local strain for the calculation of the local modulus. Most recently a third technique has been introduced, which is easy to be implemented and has the advantage of low computational cost. In this contribution, we compare these three approaches by using the same model glass and reveal the differences among them caused by the non-affine deformations.
  • We follow the dynamics of an ensemble of interacting self-propelled semi-flexible polymers in contact with a thermal bath. We characterize structure and dynamics of the passive system and as a function of the motor activity. We find that the fluctuation-dissipation relation allows for the definition of an effective temperature that is compatible with the results obtained by using a tracer particle as a thermometer. The effective temperature takes a higher value than the temperature of the bath when the effect of the motors is not correlated with the structural rearrangements they induce. Our data are compatible with a dependence upon the square of the motor strength (normalized by the average internal force) and they suggest an intriguing linear dependence on the tracer diffusion constant times the density of the embedding matrix. We show how to use this concept to rationalize experimental results and suggest possible innovative research directions.
  • We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the dynamics of an ensemble of interacting self-propelled semi-flexible polymers in contact with a thermal bath. Our intention is to model complex systems of biological interest. We find that an effective temperature allows one to rationalize the out of equilibrium dynamics of the system. This parameter is measured in several independent ways -- from fluctuation-dissipation relations and by using tracer particles -- and they all yield equivalent results. The effective temperature takes a higher value than the temperature of the bath when the effect of the motors is not correlated with the structural rearrangements they induce. We show how to use this concept to interpret experimental results and suggest possible innovative research directions.
  • We follow the dynamics of an ensemble of interacting self-propelled motorized particles in contact with an equilibrated thermal bath. We find that the fluctuation-dissipation relation allows for the definition of an effective temperature that is compatible with the results obtained using a tracer particle as a thermometer. The effective temperature takes a value which is higher than the temperature of the bath and it is continuously controlled by the motor intensity.
  • The low-temperature thermal properties of dielectric crystals are governed by acoustic excitations with large wavelengths that are well described by plane waves. This is the Debye model, which rests on the assumption that the medium is an elastic continuum, holds true for acoustic wavelengths large on the microscopic scale fixed by the interatomic spacing, and gradually breaks down on approaching it. Glasses are characterized as well by universal low-temperature thermal properties, that are however anomalous with respect to those of the corresponding crystalline phases. Related universal anomalies also appear in the low-frequency vibrational density of states and, despite of a longstanding debate, still remain poorly understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model monatomic glass of extremely large size, we show that in glasses the structural disorder undermines the Debye model in a subtle way: the elastic continuum approximation for the acoustic excitations breaks down abruptly on the mesoscopic, medium-range-order length-scale of about ten interatomic spacings, where it still works well for the corresponding crystalline systems. On this scale, the sound velocity shows a marked reduction with respect to the macroscopic value. This turns out to be closely related to the universal excess over the Debye model prediction found in glasses at frequencies of ~1 THz in the vibrational density of states or at temperatures of ~10 K in the specific heat.
  • We study a model in which particles interact with short-ranged attractive and long-ranged repulsive interactions, in an attempt to model the equilibrium cluster phase recently discovered in sterically stabilized colloidal systems in the presence of depletion interactions. At low packing fraction particles form stable equilibrium clusters which act as building blocks of a cluster fluid. We study the possibility that cluster fluids generate a low-density disordered arrested phase, a gel, via a glass transition driven by the repulsive interaction. In this model the gel formation is formally described with the same physics of the glass formation.
  • The equation of state for a liquid in equilibrium, written in the potential energy landscape formalism, is generalized to describe out-of-equilibrium conditions. The hypothesis that during aging the system explores basins associated to equilibrium configurations is the key ingredient in the derivation. Theoretical predictions are successfully compared with data from molecular dynamics simulations of different aging processes, such as temperature and pressure jumps.
  • We study the TIP5P water model proposed by Mahoney and Jorgensen, which is closer to real water than previously-proposed classical pairwise additive potentials. We simulate the model in a wide range of deeply supercooled states and find (i) the existence of a non-monotonic ``nose-shaped'' temperature of maximum density line and a non-reentrant spinodal, (ii) the presence of a low temperature phase transition, (iii) the free evolution of bulk water to ice, and (iv) the time-temperature-transformation curves at different densities.
  • Depth, number, and shape of the basins of the potential energy landscape are the key ingredients of the inherent structure thermodynamic formalism introduced by Stillinger and Weber [F. H. Stillinger and T. A. Weber, Phys. Rev. A 25, 978 (1982)]. Within this formalism, an equation of state based only on the volume dependence of these landscape properties is derived. Vibrational and configurational contributions to pressure are sorted out in a transparent way. Predictions are successfully compared with data from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of a simple model for the fragile liquid orthoterphenyl.
  • We formulate a general model for the growth of scale-free networks under filtering information conditions--that is, when the nodes can process information about only a subset of the existing nodes in the network. We find that the distribution of the number of incoming links to a node follows a universal scaling form, i.e., that it decays as a power law with an exponential truncation controlled not only by the system size but also by a feature not previously considered, the subset of the network ``accessible'' to the node. We test our model with empirical data for the World Wide Web and find agreement.
  • Numerical studies are providing novel information on the physical processes associated to physical aging. The process of aging has been shown to consist in a slow process of explorations of deeper and deeper minima of the system potential energy surface. In this article we compare the properties of the basins explored in equilibrium with those explored during the aging process both for sudden temperature changes and for sudden density changes. We find that the hypothesis that during the aging process the system explores the part of the configuration space explored in equilibrium holds only for shallow quenches or for the early aging dynamics. At longer times, systematic deviations are observed. In the case of crunches, such deviations are much more apparent.