• Measurements of the galaxy UV luminosity function at z>6 suggest that young stars hosted in low-mass star-forming galaxies produced the bulk of hydrogen-ionizing photons necessary to reionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) by redshift z~6. Whether star-forming galaxies dominated cosmic reionization, however, also depends on their stellar populations and interstellar medium properties, which set, among other things, the production rate of H-ionizing photons, $\xi_\text{ion}^\star$, and the fraction of these escaping into the IGM. Given the difficulty of constraining with existing observatories the physical properties of z>6 galaxies, in this work we focus on a sample of ten nearby objects showing UV spectral features comparable to those observed at z>6. We use the new-generation Beagle tool to model the UV-to-optical photometry and UV/optical emission lines of these Local 'analogues' of high-redshift galaxies, finding that our relatively simple, yet fully self-consistent, physical model can successfully reproduce the different observables considered. Our galaxies span a broad range of metallicities and are characterised by high ionization parameters, low dust attenuation, and very young stellar populations. Through our analysis, we derive a novel diagnostic of the production rate of H-ionizing photons per unit UV luminosity, $\xi_\text{ion}^\star$, based on the equivalent width of the bright $[\text{OIII}] \lambda 4959,5007$ doublet, which does not require measurements of H-recombination lines. This new diagnostic can be used to estimate $\xi_\text{ion}^\star$ from future direct measurements of the $[\text{OIII}] \lambda 4959,5007$ line using JWST/NIRSpec (out to z~9.5), and by exploiting the contamination by $\text{H}\beta + [\text{OIII}] \lambda 4959,5007$ of photometric observations of distant galaxies, for instance from existing Spitzer/IRAC data and from future ones with JWST/NIRCam.
  • We investigate Lya, [OIII]5007, Ha, and [CII]158um emission from 1124 galaxies at z=4.9-7.0. Our sample is composed of 1092 Lya emitters (LAEs) at z=4.9, 5.7, 6.6, and 7.0 identified by Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) narrowband surveys covered by Spitzer large area survey with Subaru/HSC (SPLASH) and 34 galaxies at z=5.148-7.508 with deep ALMA [CII]158um data in the literature. Fluxes of strong rest-frame optical lines of [OIII] and Ha (Hb) are constrained by significant excesses found in the SPLASH 3.6 and 4.5um photometry. At z=4.9, we find that the rest-frame Ha equivalent width and the Lya escape fraction f_Lya positively correlate with the rest-frame Lya equivalent width EW^0_Lya. The f_Lya-EW^0_Lya correlation is similarly found at z~0-2, suggesting no evolution of the correlation over z~0-5. The typical ionizing photon production efficiency of LAEs is logxi_ion/[Hz erg^-1]~25.5 significantly (60-100%) higher than those of LBGs at a given UV magnitude. At z=5.7-7.0, there exists an interesting turn-over trend that the [OIII]/Ha flux ratio increases in EW^0_Lya~0-30 A, and then decreases out to EW^0_Lya~130 A. We also identify an anti-correlation between a [CII] luminosity to star-formation rate ratio (L_[CII]/SFR) and EW^0_Lya at the >99% confidence level. We carefully investigate physical origins of the correlations with stellar-synthesis and photoionization models, and find that a simple anti-correlation between EW_Lya^0 and metallicity explains self-consistently all of the correlations of Lya, Ha, [OIII]/Ha, and [CII] identified in our study, indicating detections of metal-poor (~0.03 Zo) galaxies with EW^0_Lya~200 A.
  • We present an original phenomenological model to describe the evolution of galaxy number counts, morphologies, and spectral energy distributions across a wide range of redshifts (0.2<z<15) and stellar masses [Log10 M/Msun >6]. Our model follows observed mass and luminosity functions of both star-forming and quiescent galaxies, and reproduces the redshift evolution of colors, sizes, star-formation and chemical properties of the observed galaxy population. Unlike other existing approaches, our model includes a self-consistent treatment of stellar and photoionized gas emission and dust attenuation based on the BEAGLE tool. The mock galaxy catalogs generated with our new model can be used to simulate and optimize extragalactic surveys with future facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and to enable critical assessments of analysis procedures, interpretation tools, and measurement systematics for both photometric and spectroscopic data. As a first application of this work, we make predictions for the upcoming JWST Advanced Deep Extragalactic Survey (JADES), a joint program of the JWST/NIRCam and NIRSpec Guaranteed Time Observations teams. We show that JADES will detect, with NIRCam imaging, thousands of galaxies at z>6, and tens at z>10 at m_AB<30 (5-sigma) within the 236 arcmin^2 of the survey. The JADES data will enable accurate constraints on the evolution of the UV luminosity function at z>8, and resolve the current debate about the rate of evolution of galaxies at z>8. Ready to use mock catalogs and software to generate new realizations are publicly available as the JAdes extraGalactic Ultradeep Artificial Realizations (JAGUAR) package.
  • Recent studies proposed that cosmic rays (CR) are a key ingredient in setting the conditions for star formation, thanks to their ability to alter the thermal and chemical state of dense gas in the UV-shielded cores of molecular clouds. In this paper, we explore their role as regulators of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) variations, using the semi-analytic model for GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (GAEA). The new model confirms our previous results obtained using the integrated galaxy-wide IMF (IGIMF) theory: both variable IMF models reproduce the observed increase of $\alpha$-enhancement as a function of stellar mass and the measured $z=0$ excess of dynamical mass-to-light ratios with respect to photometric estimates assuming a universal IMF. We focus here on the mismatch between the photometrically-derived ($M^{\rm app}_{\star}$) and intrinsic ($M_{\star}$) stellar masses, by analysing in detail the evolution of model galaxies with different values of $M_{\star}/M^{\rm app}_{\star}$. We find that galaxies with small deviations (i.e. formally consistent with a universal IMF hypothesis) are characterized by more extended star formation histories and live in less massive haloes with respect to the bulk of the galaxy population. While the IGIMF theory does not change significantly the mean evolution of model galaxies with respect to the reference model, a CR-regulated IMF implies shorter star formation histories and higher peaks of star formation for objects more massive than $10^{10.5} M_\odot$. However, we also show that it is difficult to unveil this behaviour from observations, as the key physical quantities are typically derived assuming a universal IMF.
  • The so-called jellyfish galaxies are objects exhibiting disturbed morphology, mostly in the form of tails of gas stripped from the main body of the galaxy. Several works have strongly suggested ram pressure stripping to be the mechanism driving this phenomenon. Here, we focus on one of these objects, drawn from a sample of optically selected jellyfish galaxies, and use it to validate SINOPSIS, the spectral fitting code that will be used for the analysis of the GASP (GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE) survey, and study the spatial distribution and physical properties of gas and stellar populations in this galaxy. We compare the model spectra to those obtained with GANDALF, a code with similar features widely used to interpret the kinematic of stars and gas in galaxies from IFU data. We find that SINOPSIS can reproduce the pixel-by-pixel spectra of this galaxy at least as good as GANDALF does, providing reliable estimates of the underlying stellar absorption to properly correct the nebular gas emission. Using these results, we find strong evidences of a double effect of ram pressure exerted by the intracluster medium onto the gas of the galaxy. A moderate burst of star formation, dating between 20 and 500 Myr ago and involving the outer parts of the galaxy more strongly than the inner regions, was likely induced by a first interaction of the galaxy with the intracluster medium. Stripping by ram pressure, plus probable gas depletion due to star formation, contributed to create a truncated ionized gas disk. The presence of an extended stellar tail on only one side of the disk, points instead to another kind of process, likely a gravitational interaction by a fly-by or a close encounter with another galaxy in the cluster.
  • Galaxies occupy different regions of the [OIII]$\lambda5007$/H$\beta$-versus-[NII]$\lambda6584$/H$\alpha$ emission-line ratio diagram in the distant and local Universe. We investigate the origin of this intriguing result by modelling self-consistently, for the first time, nebular emission from young stars, accreting black holes (BHs) and older, post-asymptotic-giant-branch (post-AGB) stellar populations in galaxy formation simulations in a full cosmological context. In post-processing, we couple new-generation nebular-emission models with high-resolution, cosmological zoom-in simulations of massive galaxies to explore which galaxy physical properties drive the cosmic evolution of the optical-line ratios [OIII]$\lambda5007$/H$\beta$, [NII]$\lambda6584$/H$\alpha$, [SII]$\lambda\lambda6717,6731$/H$\alpha$ and [OI]$\lambda6300$/H$\alpha$. The line ratios of simulated galaxies agree well with observations of both star-forming and active local SDSS galaxies. Towards higher redshifts, at fixed galaxy stellar mass, the average [OIII]/H$\beta$ increases and [NII]/H$\alpha$, [SII]/H$\alpha$ and [OI]/H$\alpha$ decrease -- widely consistent with observations. At fixed stellar mass, we identify star formation history, which controls nebular emission from young stars via the ionization parameter, as the primary driver of the cosmic evolution of [OIII]/H$\beta$ and [NII]/H$\alpha$. For [SII]/H$\alpha$ and [OI]/H$\alpha$, this applies only to redshifts above $z=1.5$, the evolution at lower redshift being driven in roughly equal parts by nebular emission from AGN and post-AGB stars. Instead, changes in the hardness of ionizing radiation, ionized-gas density, the prevalence of BH accretion relative to star formation and the dust-to-metal mass ratio (whose impact on the gas-phase N/O ratio we model at fixed O/H) play at most a minor role in the cosmic evolution of simulated galaxy line ratios.
  • Nearby dwarf galaxies provide a unique laboratory in which to test stellar population models below $Z_\odot/2$. Such tests are particularly important for interpreting the surprising high-ionization UV line emission detected at $z>6$ in recent years. We present HST/COS ultraviolet spectra of ten nearby metal-poor star-forming galaxies selected to show He II emission in SDSS optical spectra. The targets span nearly a dex in gas-phase oxygen abundance ($7.8<12+\log\mathrm{O/H}<8.5$) and present uniformly large specific star formation rates (sSFR $\sim 10^2$ $\mathrm{Gyr}^{-1}$). The UV spectra confirm that metal-poor stellar populations can power extreme nebular emission in high-ionization UV lines, reaching C III] equivalent widths comparable to those seen in systems at $z\sim 6-7$. Our data reveal a marked transition in UV spectral properties with decreasing metallicity, with systems below $12+\log\mathrm{O/H}\lesssim 8.0$ ($Z/Z_\odot \lesssim 1/5$) presenting minimal stellar wind features and prominent nebular emission in He II and C IV. This is consistent with nearly an order of magnitude increase in ionizing photon production beyond the $\mathrm{He^+}$-ionizing edge relative to H-ionizing flux as metallicity decreases below a fifth solar, well in excess of standard stellar population synthesis predictions. Our results suggest that often neglected sources of energetic radiation such as stripped binary products and very massive O-stars produce a sharper change in the ionizing spectrum with decreasing metallicity than expected. Consequently, nebular emission in C IV and He II powered by these stars may provide useful metallicity constraints in the reionization era.
  • We present a new-generation tool to model and interpret spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies, which incorporates in a consistent way the production of radiation and its transfer through the interstellar and intergalactic media. This flexible tool, named BEAGLE (for BayEsian Analysis of GaLaxy sEds), allows one to build mock galaxy catalogues as well as to interpret any combination of photometric and spectroscopic galaxy observations in terms of physical parameters. The current version of the tool includes versatile modeling of the emission from stars and photoionized gas, attenuation by dust and accounting for different instrumental effects, such as spectroscopic flux calibration and line spread function. We show a first application of the BEAGLE tool to the interpretation of broadband SEDs of a published sample of ${\sim}10^4$ galaxies at redshifts $0.1 \lesssim z\lesssim8$. We find that the constraints derived on photometric redshifts using this multi-purpose tool are comparable to those obtained using public, dedicated photometric-redshift codes and quantify this result in a rigorous statistical way. We also show how the post-processing of BEAGLE output data with the Python extension PYP-BEAGLE allows the characterization of systematic deviations between models and observations, in particular through posterior predictive checks. The modular design of the BEAGLE tool allows easy extensions to incorporate, for example, the absorption by neutral galactic and circumgalactic gas, and the emission from an active galactic nucleus, dust and shock-ionized gas. Information about public releases of the BEAGLE tool will be maintained on http://www.jacopochevallard.org/beagle.
  • In this paper, we present GALEX-SDSS-WISE Legacy Catalog (GSWLC), a catalog of physical properties (stellar masses, dust attenuations and star formation rates (SFRs)) of ~700,000 galaxies with SDSS redshifts below 0.3. GSWLC contains galaxies within the GALEX footprint, regardless of a UV detection, covering 90% of SDSS. The physical properties were obtained from UV/optical SED fitting following Bayesian methodology of Salim et al. (2007), with improvements such as blending corrections for low-resolution UV photometry, flexible dust attenuation laws, and emission line corrections. GSWLC includes mid-IR SFRs derived from IR templates based upon 22 micron WISE observations. These estimates are independent of UV/optical SED fitting, in order to separate possible systematics. The paper argues that the comparison of specific SFRs (SSFRs) is more informative and physically motivated than the comparison of SFRs. SSFRs resulting from the UV/optical SED fitting are compared to the mid-IR SSFRs, and to SSFRs from three published catalogs. For "main sequence" galaxies with no AGN contribution all SSFRs are in very good agreement (within 0.1 dex on average). In particular, the widely-used aperture-corrected SFRs from MPA/JHU catalog show no systematic offsets, in contrast to some integral-field spectroscopy results. For galaxies below the main sequence (log SSFR<-11), mid-IR (S)SFRs based on fixed luminosity-SFR conversion are severely biased (up to 2 dex) because the dust is primarily heated by old stars. Furthermore, mid-IR (S)SFRs are overestimated by up to 0.6 dex for galaxies with AGN, presumably due to non-stellar dust heating. UV/optical (S)SFRs are thus preferred to IR-based (S)SFRs for quenched galaxies and those which host AGN.
  • We present a new model of the nebular emission from star-forming galaxies in a wide range of chemical compositions, appropriate to interpret observations of galaxies at all cosmic epochs. The model relies on the combination of state-of-the-art stellar population synthesis and photoionization codes to describe the ensemble of HII regions and the diffuse gas ionized by young stars in a galaxy. A main feature of this model is the self-consistent yet versatile treatment of element abundances and depletion onto dust grains, which allows one to relate the observed nebular emission from a galaxy to both gas-phase and dust-phase metal enrichment. We show that this model can account for the rest-frame ultraviolet and optical emission-line properties of galaxies at different redshifts and find that ultraviolet emission lines are more sensitive than optical ones to parameters such as C/O abundance ratio, hydrogen gas density, dust-to-metal mass ratio and upper cutoff of the stellar initial mass function. We also find that, for gas-phase metallicities around solar to slightly sub-solar, widely used formulae to constrain oxygen ionic fractions and the C/O ratio from ultraviolet and optical emission-line luminosities are reasonable faithful. However, the recipes break down at non-solar metallicities, making them inappropriate to study chemically young galaxies. In such cases, a fully self-consistent model of the kind presented in this paper is required to interpret the observed nebular emission.
  • We discuss new Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations of four luminous galaxies at z~7-9 selected to have intense optical line emission by Roberts-Borsani et al. (2016). Previous follow-up has revealed Lyman-alpha in two of the four galaxies. Our new MOSFIRE observations confirm that Lyman-alpha is present in the entire sample. We detect Lyman-alpha emission in COS-zs7-1, confirming its redshift as z=7.154, and we detect Lyman-alpha in EGS-zs8-2 at z=7.477, verifying a tentative detection presented in an earlier study. The ubiquity of Lyman-alpha in this sample is puzzling given that the IGM is likely significantly neutral over 7<z<9. To investigate this result in more detail, we have initiated a campaign to target UV metal emission in the four Lyman-alpha emitters as a probe of both the radiation field and the velocity offset of Lyman-alpha. Here we present the detection of intense CIII] emission in EGS-zs8-1, a galaxy from this sample previously shown to have Lyman-alpha at z=7.73. Photoionization models indicate that an intense radiation field and low metallicity are required to reproduce the intense CIII] and optical line emission. We argue that this extreme radiation field is likely to affect the local environment, increasing the transmission of Lyman-alpha through the galaxy. Moreover, the centroid of CIII] indicates that Lyman-alpha is redshifted from the systemic value by 340 km/s. This velocity offset is larger than that seen in less luminous systems, providing an additional explanation for the transmission of Lyman-alpha emission through the IGM. Since the transmission is further enhanced by the likelihood that such systems are also situated in the densest regions with the largest ionized bubbles, the visibility of Lyman-alpha at z>7 is expected to be strongly luminosity-dependent, with the most effective transmission occurring in systems with intense star formation.
  • Systematic variations of the IMF in early-type galaxies, and their connection with possible drivers such as velocity dispersion or metallicity, have been much debated in recent years. Strong lensing over galaxy scales combined with photometric and spectroscopic data provides a powerful method to constrain the stellar mass-to-light ratio and hence the functional form of the IMF. We combine photometric and spectroscopic constraints from the latest set of population synthesis models of Charlot & Bruzual, including a varying IMF, with a non-parametric analysis of the lens masses of 18 ETGs from the SLACS survey, with velocity dispersions in the range 200-300 km/s. We find that very bottom-heavy IMFs are excluded. However, the upper limit to the bimodal IMF slope ($\mu \lesssim 2.2$, accounting for a dark matter fraction of 20-30%, where $\mu=1.3$ corresponds to a Kroupa-like IMF) is compatible at the $1\sigma$ level with constraints imposed by gravity-sensitive line strengths. A two-segment power law parameterisation of the IMF (Salpeter-like for high masses) is more constrained ($\Gamma \lesssim 1.5$, where $\Gamma$ is the power index at low masses) but requires a dark matter contribution of $\gtrsim 25\%$ to reconcile the results with a Salpeter IMF. For a standard Milky Way-like IMF to be applicable, a significant dark matter contribution is required within $1R_e$. Our results reveal a large range of allowed IMF slopes, which, when interpreted as intrinsic scatter in the IMF properties of ETGs, could explain the recent results of Smith et al., who find Milky Way-like IMF normalisations in a few massive lensing ETGs.
  • We present Star Formation Histories (SFHs) for a sample of 104 massive (stellar mass M > 10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$) quiescent galaxies (MQGs) at $z$=1.0-1.5 from the analysis of spectro-photometric data from the SHARDS and HST/WFC3 G102 and G141 surveys of the GOODS-N field, jointly with broad-band observations from ultraviolet (UV) to far-infrared (Far-IR). The sample is constructed on the basis of rest-frame UVJ colours and specific star formation rates (sSFR=SFR/Mass). The Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of each galaxy are compared to models assuming a delayed exponentially declining SFH. A Monte Carlo algorithm characterizes the degeneracies, which we are able to break taking advantage of the SHARDS data resolution, by measuring indices such as MgUV and D4000. The population of MQGs shows a duality in their properties. The sample is dominated (85%) by galaxies with young mass-weighted ages, tM $<$ 2 Gyr, short star formation timescales, $\langle \tau \rangle$ $\sim$ 60-200 Myr, and masses log(M/M$_{\odot}$) $\sim$ 10.5. There is an older population (15%) with tM$=$2 - 4 Gyr, longer star formation timescales, $\langle \tau \rangle$$\sim$ 400 Myr, and larger masses, log(M/M$_{\odot}$) $\sim$ 10.7. The SFHs of our MQGs are consistent with the slope and the location of the Main Sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies at $z$ $>$ 1.0, when our galaxies were 0.5-1.0 Gyr old. According to these SFHs, all the MQGs experienced a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG) phase that lasts for $\sim$ 500 Myr, and half of them an Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxy (ULIRG) phase for $\sim$ 100 Myr. We find that the MQG population is almost assembled at $z$ $\sim$ 1, and continues evolving passively with few additions to the population.
  • Mass models of galactic disks traditionally rely on axisymmetric density and rotation curves, paradoxically acting as if their most remarkable asymmetric features, such as lopsidedness or spiral arms, were not important. In this article, we relax the axisymmetry approximation and introduce a methodology that derives 3D gravitational potentials of disk-like objects and robustly estimates the impacts of asymmetries on circular velocities in the disk midplane. Mass distribution models can then be directly fitted to asymmetric line-of-sight velocity fields. Applied to the grand-design spiral M99, the new strategy shows that circular velocities are highly nonuniform, particularly in the inner disk of the galaxy, as a natural response to the perturbed gravitational potential of luminous matter. A cuspy inner density profile of dark matter is found in M99, in the usual case where luminous and dark matter share the same center. The impact of the velocity nonuniformity is to make the inner profile less steep, although the density remains cuspy. On another hand, a model where the halo is core dominated and shifted by 2.2-2.5 kpc from the luminous mass center is more appropriate to explain most of the kinematical lopsidedness evidenced in the velocity field of M99. However, the gravitational potential of luminous baryons is not asymmetric enough to explain the kinematical lopsidedness of the innermost regions, irrespective of the density shape of dark matter. This discrepancy points out the necessity of an additional dynamical process in these regions: possibly a lopsided distribution of dark matter.
  • In the context of observations of the rest-frame ultraviolet and optical emission from distant galaxies, we explore the emission-line properties of photoionization models of active and inactive galaxies. Our aim is to identify new line-ratio diagnostics to discriminate between gas photoionization by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation. We use a standard photoionization code to compute the emission from AGN narrow-line regions and compare this with calculations of the nebular emission from star-forming galaxies achieved using the same code. We confirm the appropriateness of widely used optical spectral diagnostics of nuclear activity versus star formation and explore new diagnostics at ultraviolet wavelengths. We find that combinations of a collisionally excited metal line or line multiplet, such as CIV 1548,1551, OIII]1661,1666, NIII]1750, [SiIII]1883+[SiIII]1892 and [CIII]1907+CIII]1909, with the HeII 1640 recombination line are individually good discriminants of the nature of the ionizing source. Diagrams involving at least 3 of these lines allow an even more stringent distinction between active and inactive galaxies, as well as valuable constraints on interstellar gas parameters and the shape of the ionizing radiation. Several line ratios involving Ne-based emission lines, such as [NeIV]2424, [NeIII]3343 and [NeV]3426, are also good diagnostics of nuclear activity. Our results provide a comprehensive framework to identify the sources of photoionization and physical conditions of the ionized gas from the ultraviolet and optical nebular emission from galaxies. This will be particularly useful to interpret observations of high-redshift galaxies with future facilities, such as the James Webb Space Telescope and extremely large ground-based telescopes.
  • In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at intermediate redshifts (z~1). We combine the ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric data from the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS) with deep UV-to-FIR observations in the GOODS-N field. Exploiting two of the 25 SHARDS medium-band filters, F687W17 and F823W17, we select [OII] emission line galaxies at z~0.84 and z~1.23 and characterize their physical properties. Their rest-frame equivalent widths (EW$_{\mathrm{rf}}$([OII])), line fluxes, luminosities, star formation rates (SFRs) and dust attenuation properties are investigated. The evolution of the EW$_{\mathrm{rf}}$([OII]) closely follows the SFR density evolution of the universe, with a trend of EW$_{\mathrm{rf}}$([OII])$\propto$(1+z)$^3$ up to redshift z~1, followed by a possible flattening. The SF properties of the galaxies selected on the basis of their [OII] emission are compared with complementary samples of SFGs selected by their MIR and FIR emission, and also with a general mass-selected sample of galaxies at the same redshifts. We demonstrate observationally that the UVJ diagram (or, similarly, a cut in the specific SFR) is only partially able to distinguish the quiescent galaxies from the SFGs. The SFR-M$_*$ relation is investigated for the different samples, yelding a logarithmic slope ~1, in good agreement with previous results. The dust attenuations derived from different SFR indicators (UV(1600), UV(2800), [OII], IR) are compared and show clear trends with respect to both the stellar mass and total SFR, with more massive and highly star-forming galaxies being affected by stronger dust attenuation.
  • We present Keck/MOSFIRE observations of UV metal lines in four bright gravitationally-lensed z~6-8 galaxies behind the cluster Abell 1703. The spectrum of A1703-zd6, a highly-magnified star forming galaxy with a Lyman-alpha redshift of z=7.045, reveals a confident detection of the nebular CIV emission line (unresolved with FWHM < 125 km/s). UV metal lines are not detected in the three other galaxies. At z~2-3, nebular CIV emission is observed in just 1% of UV-selected galaxies. The presence of strong CIV emission in one of the small sample of galaxies targeted in this paper may indicate hard ionizing spectra are more common at z~7. The total estimated equivalent width of the CIV doublet (38 A) and CIV/Lyman-alpha flux ratio (0.3) are comparable to measurements of narrow-lined AGNs. Photoionization models show that the nebular CIV line can also be reproduced by a young stellar population, with very hot metal poor stars dominating the photon flux responsible for triply ionizing carbon. Regardless of the origin of the CIV, we show that the ionizing spectrum of A1703-zd6 is different from that of typical galaxies at z~2, producing more H ionizing photons per unit 1500A luminosity and a larger flux density at 30-50 eV. If such extreme radiation fields are typical in UV-selected systems at z>7, it would indicate that reionization-era galaxies are more efficient ionizing agents than previously thought. Alternatively, we suggest that the small sample of Lyman-alpha emitters at z>7 may trace a rare population with intense radiation fields capable of ionizing their surrounding hydrogen distribution. Additional constraints on high ionization emission lines in galaxies with and without Lyman-alpha detections will help clarify whether hard ionizing spectra are common in the reionization era.
  • This White Paper presents the scientific motivations for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) on the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The MOS case draws on all fields of contemporary astronomy, from extra-solar planets, to the study of the halo of the Milky Way and its satellites, and from resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies out to observations of the earliest 'first-light' structures in the partially-reionised Universe. The material presented here results from thorough discussions within the community over the past four years, building on the past competitive studies to agree a common strategy toward realising a MOS capability on the E-ELT. The cases have been distilled to a set of common requirements which will be used to define the MOSAIC instrument, entailing two observational modes ('high multiplex' and 'high definition'). When combined with the unprecedented sensitivity of the E-ELT, MOSAIC will be the world's leading MOS facility. In analysing the requirements we also identify a high-multiplex MOS for the longer-term plans for the E-ELT, with an even greater multiplex (>1000 targets) to enable studies of large-scale structures in the high-redshift Universe. Following the green light for the construction of the E-ELT the MOS community, structured through the MOSAIC consortium, is eager to realise a MOS on the E-ELT as soon as possible. We argue that several of the most compelling cases for ELT science, in highly competitive areas of modern astronomy, demand such a capability. For example, MOS observations in the early stages of E-ELT operations will be essential for follow-up of sources identified by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In particular, multi-object adaptive optics and accurate sky subtraction with fibres have both recently been demonstrated on sky, making fast-track development of MOSAIC feasible.
  • The epoch when low-mass star forming galaxies (LMSFGs) form the bulk of their stellar mass is uncertain. While some models predict an early formation, others favor a delayed scenario until later ages of the universe. We present constraints on the star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of LMSFGs obtained through the analysis of their spectral energy distributions using a novel approach that (1) consistently combines photometric (broadband) and spectroscopic (equivalent widths of emission lines) data, and (2) uses physically motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time. The sample includes 31 spectroscopically confirmed LMSFGs (7.3 < log M*/Msun < 8.0) at 0.3 < z_spec < 0.9 in the Extended-Chandra Deep Field-South field (E-CDF-S). Among them, 24 were selected with photometric stellar mass log M*/Msun < 8.0, 0.3 < z_phot < 1.0, and NB816 < 26 AB mag; the remaining 7 were selected as blue compact dwarfs (BCDs) within the same photometric redshift and magnitude ranges. We also study a secondary sample of 43 more massive spectroscopically confirmed galaxies (8.0 < log M*/Msun < 9.1), selected with the same criteria. The SFRs and stellar masses derived for both samples place our targets on the standard main sequence of star forming galaxies. The median SFH of LMSFGs at intermediate redshifts appears to form 90% of the median stellar mass inferred for the sample in the 0.5-1.8 Gyr immediately preceding the observation. These results suggest a recent stellar mass assembly for LMSFGs, consistent with the cosmological downsizing trends. We find similar median SFH timescales for the more massive secondary sample.
  • It has been proposed that the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies exhibits a secondary dependence on star formation rate (SFR), and that the resulting M-Z-SFR relation may be redshift-invariant, i.e., "fundamental." However, conflicting results on the character of the SFR dependence, and whether it exists, have been reported. To gain insight into the origins of the conflicting results, we (a) devise a non-parametric, astrophysically motivated analysis framework based on the offset from the star-forming ("main") sequence at a given stellar mass (relative specific SFR), (b) apply this methodology and perform a comprehensive re-analysis of the local M-Z-SFR relation, based on SDSS, GALEX, and WISE data, and (c) study the impact of sample selection, and of using different metallicity and SFR indicators. We show that metallicity is anti-correlated with specific SFR regardless of the indicators used. We do not find that the relation is spurious due to correlations arising from biased metallicity measurements, or fiber aperture effects. We emphasize that the dependence is weak/absent for massive galaxies ($\log M_*>10.5$), and that the overall scatter in the M-Z-SFR relation does not greatly decrease from the M-Z relation. We find that the dependence is stronger for the highest SSFR galaxies above the star-forming sequence. This two-mode behavior can be described with a broken linear fit in 12+log(O/H) vs. log (SFR$/M_*$), at a given $M_*$. Previous parameterizations used for comparative analysis with higher redshift samples that do not account for the more detailed behavior of the local M-Z-SFR relation may incorrectly lead to the conclusion that those samples follow a different relationship.
  • Interpreting observations of distant galaxies in terms of constraints on physical parameters - such as stellar mass, star-formation rate (SFR) and dust optical depth - requires spectral synthesis modelling. We analyse the reliability of these physical parameters as determined under commonly adopted `classical' assumptions: star-formation histories assumed to be exponentially declining functions of time, a simple dust law and no emission-line contribution. Improved modelling techniques and data quality now allow us to use a more sophisticated approach, including realistic star-formation histories, combined with modern prescriptions for dust attenuation and nebular emission (Pacifici et al. 2012). We present a Bayesian analysis of the spectra and multi-wavelength photometry of 1048 galaxies from the 3D-HST survey in the redshift range 0.7<z<2.8 and in the stellar mass range 9<log(M/Mo)<12. We find that, using the classical spectral library, stellar masses are systematically overestimated (~0.1 dex) and SFRs are systematically underestimated (~0.6 dex) relative to our more sophisticated approach. We also find that the simultaneous fit of photometric fluxes and emission-line equivalent widths helps break a degeneracy between SFR and optical depth of the dust, reducing the uncertainties on these parameters. Finally, we show how the biases of classical approaches can affect the correlation between stellar mass and SFR for star-forming galaxies (the `Star-Formation Main Sequence'). We conclude that the normalization, slope and scatter of this relation strongly depend on the adopted approach and demonstrate that the classical, oversimplified approach cannot recover the true distribution of stellar mass and SFR.
  • Deep spectroscopic observations of z~6.5 galaxies have revealed a marked decline with increasing redshift in the detectability of Lyman-alpha emission. While this may offer valuable insight into the end of the reionisation process, it presents a fundamental challenge to the detailed spectroscopic study of the many hundreds of photometrically-selected distant sources now being found via deep HST imaging, and particularly those bright sources viewed through foreground lensing clusters. In this paper we demonstrate the validity of a new way forward via the convincing detection of an alternative diagnostic line, CIII]1909, seen in spectroscopic exposures of two star forming galaxies at z=6.029 and 7.213. The former detection is based on a 3.5 hour X-shooter spectrum of a bright (J=25.2) gravitationally-lensed galaxy behind the cluster Abell 383. The latter detection is based on a 4.2 hour MOSFIRE spectra of one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxies, GN-108036, with J=25.2. Both targets were chosen for their continuum brightness and previously-known redshift (based on Lyman-alpha), ensuring that any CIII] emission would be located in a favorable portion of the near-infrared sky spectrum. We compare our CIII] and Lyman-alpha equivalent widths in the context of those found at z~2 from earlier work and discuss the motivation for using lines other than Lyman-alpha to study galaxies in the reionisation era.
  • We present deep spectroscopy of 17 very low mass (M* ~ 2.0x10^6 Msun to 1.4x10^9 Msun) and low luminosity (M_UV ~ -13.7 to -19.9) gravitationally lensed galaxies in the redshift range z~1.5-3.0. Deep rest-frame ultraviolet spectra reveal large equivalent width emission from numerous lines (NIV], OIII], CIV, Si III], CIII]) which are rarely seen in individual spectra of more massive star forming galaxies. CIII] is detected in 16 of 17 low mass star forming systems with rest-frame equivalent widths as large as 13.5 Angstroms. Nebular CIV emission is present in the most extreme CIII] emitters, requiring an ionizing source capable of producing a substantial component of photons with energies in excess of 47.9 eV. Photoionization models support a picture whereby the large equivalent widths are driven by the increased electron temperature and enhanced ionizing output arising from metal poor gas and stars, young stellar populations, and large ionization parameters. The young ages implied by the emission lines and continuum SEDs indicate that the extreme line emitters in our sample are in the midst of a significant upturn in their star formation activity. The low stellar masses, blue UV colors, and large sSFRs of our sample are similar to those of typical z>6 galaxies. Given the strong attenuation of Ly-alpha in z>6 galaxies we suggest that CIII] is likely to provide our best probe of early star forming galaxies with ground-based spectrographs and one of the most efficient means of confirming z>10 galaxies with the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • Near infrared slitless spectroscopy with the Wide Field Camera 3, onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, offers a unique opportunity to study low-mass galaxy populations at high-redshift ($z\sim$1-2). While most high$-z$ surveys are biased towards massive galaxies, we are able to select sources via their emission lines that have very-faint continua. We investigate the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass ($M_{\star}$) relation for about 1000 emission-line galaxies identified over a wide redshift range of $0.3 \lesssim z \lesssim 2.3$. We use the H$_{\alpha}$ emission as an accurate SFR indicator and correct the broadband photometry for the strong nebular contribution to derive accurate stellar masses down to $M_{\star} \sim 10^{7} M_{\odot}$. We focus here on a subsample of galaxies that show extremely strong emission lines (EELGs) with rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 200 to 1500 \AA. This population consists of outliers to the normal SFR-$M_{\star}$ sequence with much higher specific SFRs ($> 10$ Gyr$^{-1}$). While on-sequence galaxies follow a continuous star formation process, EELGs are thought to be caught during an extreme burst of star formation that can double their stellar mass in less than $100$ Myr. The contribution of starbursts to the total star formation density appears to be larger than what has been reported for more massive galaxies in previous studies. In the complete mass range $8.2 <$ log($M_{\star}/M_{\odot}$) $< 10$ and a SFR lower completeness limit of about 2 $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ (10 $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$) at $z\sim1$ ($z \sim 2$), we find that starbursts having EW$_{rest}$(H$_{\alpha}$)$>$ 300, 200, and 100 A contribute up to $\sim13$, 18, and 34 %, respectively, to the total SFR of emission-line selected sample at $z\sim1-2$. The comparison with samples of massive galaxies shows an increase in the contribution of starbursts towards lower masses.
  • Emission line diagnostic diagrams probing the ionization sources in galaxies, such as the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich (BPT) diagram, have been used extensively to distinguish AGN from purely star-forming galaxies. Yet, they remain poorly understood at higher redshifts. We shed light on this issue with an empirical approach based on a z~0 reference sample built from ~300,000 SDSS galaxies, from which we mimic selection effects due to typical emission line detection limits at higher redshift. We combine this low-redshift reference sample with a simple prescription for luminosity evolution of the global galaxy population to predict the loci of high-redshift galaxies on the BPT and Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic diagrams. The predicted bivariate distributions agree remarkably well with direct observations of galaxies out to z~1.5, including the observed stellar mass-metallicity (MZ) relation evolution. As a result, we infer that high-redshift star-forming galaxies are consistent with having "normal" ISM properties out to z~1.5, after accounting for selection effects and line luminosity evolution. Namely, their optical line ratios and gas-phase metallicities are comparable to that of low-redshift galaxies with equivalent emission-line luminosities. In contrast, AGN narrow-line regions may show a shift toward lower metallicities at higher redshift. While a physical evolution of the ISM conditions is not ruled out for purely star-forming galaxies, and may be more important starting at z>2, we find that reliably quantifying this evolution is hindered by selections effects. The recipes provided here may serve as a basis for future studies toward this goal. Code to predict the loci of galaxies on the BPT and MEx diagnostic diagrams, and the MZ relation as a function of emission line luminosity limits, is made publicly available.