• We compute upper limits on the nanohertz-frequency isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB) using the 9-year data release from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. We set upper limits for a GWB from supermassive black hole binaries under power law, broken power law, and free spectral coefficient GW spectrum models. We place a 95\% upper limit on the strain amplitude (at a frequency of yr$^{-1}$) in the power law model of $A_{\rm gw} < 1.5\times 10^{-15}$. For a broken power law model, we place priors on the strain amplitude derived from simulations of Sesana (2013) and McWilliams et al. (2014). We find that the data favor a broken power law to a pure power law with odds ratios of 22 and 2.2 to one for the McWilliams and Sesana prior models, respectively. The McWilliams model is essentially ruled out by the data, and the Sesana model is in tension with the data under the assumption of a pure power law. Using the broken power-law analysis we construct posterior distributions on environmental factors that drive the binary to the GW-driven regime including the stellar mass density for stellar-scattering, mass accretion rate for circumbinary disk interaction, and orbital eccentricity for eccentric binaries, marking the first time that the shape of the GWB spectrum has been used to make astrophysical inferences. We then place the most stringent limits so far on the energy density of relic GWs, $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)\,h^2 < 4.2 \times 10^{-10}$, yielding a limit on the Hubble parameter during inflation of $H_*=1.6\times10^{-2}~m_{Pl}$, where $m_{Pl}$ is the Planck mass. Our limit on the cosmic string GWB, $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)\, h^2 < 2.2 \times 10^{-10}$, translates to a conservative limit of $G\mu<3.3\times 10^{-8}$ - a factor of 4 better than the joint Planck and high-$l$ CMB data from other experiments.
  • We describe several new techniques which accelerate Bayesian searches for continuous gravitational-wave emission from supermassive black-hole binaries using pulsar timing arrays. These techniques mitigate the problematic increase of search-dimensionality with the size of the pulsar array which arises from having to include an extra parameter per pulsar as the array is expanded. This extra parameter corresponds to searching over the phase of the gravitational-wave as it propagates past each pulsar so that we can coherently include the pulsar-term in our search strategies. Our techniques make the analysis tractable with powerful evidence-evaluation packages like MultiNest. We find good agreement of our techniques with the parameter-estimation and Bayes factor evaluation performed with full signal templates, and conclude that these techniques make excellent first-cut tools for detection and characterisation of continuous gravitational-wave signals with pulsar timing arrays. Crucially, at low to moderate signal-to-noise ratios the factor by which the analysis is sped up can be > 100, permitting rigorous programs of systematic injection and recovery of signals to establish robust detection criteria within a Bayesian formalism.
  • We describe an alternative approach to the analysis of gravitational-wave backgrounds, based on the formalism used to characterise the polarisation of the cosmic microwave background. In contrast to standard analyses, this approach makes no assumptions about the nature of the background and so has the potential to reveal much more about the physical processes that generated it. An arbitrary background can be decomposed into modes whose angular dependence on the sky is given by gradients and curls of spherical harmonics. We derive the pulsar timing overlap reduction functions for the individual modes, which are given by simple combinations of spherical harmonics evaluated at the pulsar locations. We show how these can be used to recover the components of an arbitrary background, giving explicit results for both isotropic and anisotropic uncorrelated backgrounds. We also find that the response of a pulsar timing array to curl modes is identically zero, so half of the gravitational-wave sky will never be observed using pulsar timing, no matter how many pulsars are included in the array. An isotropic, unpolarised and uncorrelated background can be accurately represented using only three modes, and so a search of this type will be only slightly more complicated than the standard cross-correlation search using the Hellings and Downs overlap reduction function. However, by measuring the components of individual modes of the background and checking for consistency with isotropy, this approach has the potential to reveal much more information. Each individual mode on its own describes a background that is correlated between different points on the sky. A measurement of the components that indicates the presence of correlations in the background on large angular scales would suggest startling new physics.
  • A new model independent method is presented for the analysis of pulsar timing data and the estimation of the spectral properties of an isotropic gravitational wave background (GWB). We show that by rephrasing the likelihood we are able to eliminate the most costly aspects of computation normally associated with this type of data analysis. When applied to the International Pulsar Timing Array Mock Data Challenge data sets this results in speedups of approximately 2 to 3 orders of magnitude compared to established methods. We present three applications of the new likelihood. In the low signal to noise regime we sample directly from the power spectrum coefficients of the GWB signal realization. In the high signal to noise regime, where the data can support a large number of coefficients, we sample from the joint probability density of the power spectrum coefficients for the individual pulsars and the GWB signal realization. Critically in both these cases we need make no assumptions about the form of the power spectrum of the GWB, or the individual pulsars. Finally we present a method for characterizing the spatial correlation between pulsars on the sky, making no assumptions about the form of that correlation, and therefore providing the only truly general Bayesian method of confirming a GWB detection from pulsar timing data.
  • We consider a surface $M$ immersed in $\mathbb{R}^3$ with induced metric $g=\psi\delta_2$ where $\delta_2$ is the two dimensional Euclidean metric. We then construct a system of partial differential equations that constrain $M$ to lift to a minimal surface via the Weierstrauss-Enneper representation demanding the metric is of the above form. It is concluded that the associated surfaces connecting the prescribed minimal surface and its conjugate surface satisfy the system. Moreover, we find a non-trivial symmetry of the PDE which generates a one parameter family of surfaces isometric to a specified minimal surface. We demonstrate an instance of the analysis for the helicoid and catenoid.
  • Given two univalent harmonic mappings $f_1$ and $f_2$ on $\mathbb{D}$, which lift to minimal surfaces via the Weierstrass-Enneper representation theorem, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for $f_3=(1-s)f_1+sf_2$ to lift to a minimal surface for $s\in[0,1]$. We then construct such mappings from Enneper's surface to Scherk's singularly periodic surface, Sckerk's doubly periodic surface to the catenoid, and the 4-Enneper surface to the 4-noid.
  • In this paper we present numerical modeling results for endcap and linear ion traps, used for experiments at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK and Innsbruck University respectively. The secular frequencies for Strontium-88 and Calcium-40 ions were calculated from ion trajectories, simulated using boundary-element and finite-difference numerical methods. The results were compared against experimental measurements. Both numerical methods showed high accuracy with boundary-element method being more accurate. Such simulations can be useful tools for designing new traps and trap arrays. They can also be used for obtaining precise trapping parameters for desired ion control when no analytical approach is possible as well as for investigating the ion heating rates due to thermal electronic noise.