• We present transport and scanning SQUID measurements on InAs/GaSb double quantum wells, a system predicted to be a two-dimensional topological insulator. Top and back gates allow independent control of density and band offset, allowing tuning from the trivial to the topological regime. In the trivial regime, bulk conductivity is quenched but transport persists along the edges, superficially resembling the predicted helical edge-channels in the topological regime. We characterize edge conduction in the trivial regime in a wide variety of sample geometries and measurement configurations, as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and edge length. Despite similarities to studies claiming measurements of helical edge channels, our characterization points to a non-topological origin for these observations.
  • A Corbino ring geometry is utilized to analyze edge and bulk conductance of InAs/GaSb quantum well structures. We show that edge conductance exists in the trivial regime of this theoretically-predicted topological system with a temperature insensitive linear resistivity per unit length in the range of 2 kOhm/um. A resistor network model of the device is developed to decouple the edge conductance from the bulk conductance, providing a quantitative technique to further investigate the nature of this trivial edge conductance, conclusively identified here as being of n-type.
  • Among the theoretically predicted two-dimensional topological insulators, InAs/GaSb double quantum wells (DQWs) have a unique double-layered structure with electron and hole gases separated in two layers, which enables tuning of the band alignment via electric and magnetic fields. However, the rich trivial-topological phase diagram has yet to be experimentally explored. We present an in situ and continuous tuning between the trivial and topological insulating phases in InAs/GaSb DQWs through electrical dual-gating. Furthermore, we show that an in-plane magnetic field shifts the electron and hole bands relatively to each other in momentum space, functioning as a powerful tool to discriminate between the topologically distinct states.
  • Majorana fermions are predicted to localize at the edge of a topological superconductor, a state of matter that can form when a ferromagnetic system is placed in proximity to a conventional superconductor with strong spin-orbit interaction. With the goal of realizing a one-dimensional topological superconductor, we have fabricated ferromagnetic iron (Fe) atomic chains on the surface of superconducting lead (Pb). Using high-resolution spectroscopic imaging techniques, we show that the onset of superconductivity, which gaps the electronic density of states in the bulk of the Fe chains, is accompanied by the appearance of zero energy end states. This spatially resolved signature provides strong evidence, corroborated by other observations, for the formation of a topological phase and edge-bound Majorana fermions in our atomic chains.
  • The hallmark of a time-reversal symmetry protected topologically insulating state of matter in two-dimensions (2D) is the existence of chiral edge modes propagating along the perimeter of the system. To date, evidence for such electronic modes has come from experiments on semiconducting heterostructures in the topological phase which showed approximately quantized values of the overall conductance as well as edge-dominated current flow. However, there have not been any spectroscopic measurements to demonstrate the one-dimensional (1D) nature of the edge modes. Among the first systems predicted to be a 2D topological insulator are bilayers of bismuth (Bi) and there have been recent experimental indications of possible topological boundary states at their edges. However, the experiments on such bilayers suffered from irregular structure of their edges or the coupling of the edge states to substrate's bulk states. Here we report scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments which show that a subset of the predicted Bi-bilayers' edge states are decoupled from states of Bi substrate and provide direct spectroscopic evidence of their 1D nature. Moreover, by visualizing the quantum interference of edge mode quasi-particles in confined geometries, we demonstrate their remarkable coherent propagation along the edge with scattering properties that are consistent with strong suppression of backscattering as predicted for the propagating topological edge states.
  • Electrical conductance through InAs nanowires is relevant for electronic applications as well as for fundamental quantum experiments. Here we employ nominally undoped, slightly tapered InAs nanowires to study the diameter dependence of their conductance. Contacting multiple sections of each wire, we can study the diameter dependence within individual wires without the need to compare different nanowire batches. At room temperature we find a diameter-independent conductivity for diameters larger than 40 nm, indicative of three-dimensional diffusive transport. For smaller diameters, the resistance increases considerably, in coincidence with a strong suppression of the mobility. From an analysis of the effective charge carrier density, we find indications for a surface accumulation layer.